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Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 32
life as a sacred trust, given to them for honorable service to their fellow men and women. I would have them feel that, whether rich or poor, they are bound to be of use in their day and generation, and to be mindful of the Scripture saying that no man liveth unto himself. We all have our part to do in keeping up the character and credit of our country. For her sake we should study to become good and useful citizens. In the summer of 1909 the Cretan question came up again. Once more Turkey attempted to regain active possession of Crete; once more the voice of Christendom was raised in protest. She had no thought this time of being too old. Being called upon for help, she wrote at once to President Taft, praying him to find some way to help the Cretans in the terrible prospect of their being delivered over, bound hand and foot, to Turkish misrule. She was soon gladdened by a reply from the President, saying that he had not considered the Cretans as he should, but promising t
Panama City (Panama) (search for this): chapter 32
Hague Conferences which he has attended. We reached Green Peace in time for Mr. Frank Potter to sing about half of my songs. He has a fine tenor voice, well cultivated, and is very kind about my small compositions. I had not counted upon this pleasure. I dreaded this visit, for the troublesome journey, but it has been delightful. I am charmed to see my son so handsomely and comfortably established, and with a very devoted wife. Potter brought me some flowers and a curious orchid from Panama. November 3. Oak Glen. Yesterday and to-day have had most exquisite sittings in front of my house in the warm sunshine; very closely wrapped up by the dear care of my daughters. These sittings were on what she called her boulevard, a grassy space in front of the house, bordering on the road, and taking the full strength of the morning sun. Here, with the tall screen of cedars behind her, and a nut tree spreading its golden canopy over her head, she would sit for hours, drinking in the
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 32
abits rendering it entirely unnecessary. She threatened to write to her man of business. I would rather die, she said, than be an old woman with a nurse! Maud and Florence wept, argued, implored, but the nurse was dismissed. The Journal acknowledges that her ministrations and Dr. Cobb's diagnosis have been very beneficial to my bodily health. On the same day she records the visit of a Persian Prince, who had come to this country chiefly to see two persons, the President of the United States and Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. He also claims to be a reincarnation of some remarkable philosopher; and to be so greatly interested in the cause of Peace that he declines to visit our ships now in the harbor here, to which he has been invited. Reading Theodore Parker's sermon on Wisdom and Intellect, she found it so full of notable sayings that she thought a little familiar book of daily inspiration and aspiration might be made from his writings: she wrote to Mr. Francis J. Garrison sugges
Heidelberg (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 32
ment, and then wrote after her signature,--Wandered to Smith College In pursuit of knowledge; Leaves so much the wiser, Nothing can surprise her! She reached home apparently without undue fatigue. She will be more tired to-morrowl we said; but she was not. Her son came for the week-end, and his presence was always a cordial. Sunday was a happy day. In the evening we gathered round the piano, she playing, son and daughters singing the old German student songs brought by Uncle Sam from Heidelberg seventy years before. On the Tuesday she went to the Papeterie, and was the life and soul of the party, sparkling with merriment. Driving home, it was so warm that she begged to have the top of the carriage put back, and so she enjoyed the crowning pageant of the autumn, the full hunter's moon and the crimson ball of the sun both visible at once. Wednesday found her busy at her desk, confessing to a slight cold, but making nothing of it. The next day bronchitis developed, followed b
Persian Prince (search for this): chapter 32
d my intention of dispensing with the services of a trained nurse, my good health and simple habits rendering it entirely unnecessary. She threatened to write to her man of business. I would rather die, she said, than be an old woman with a nurse! Maud and Florence wept, argued, implored, but the nurse was dismissed. The Journal acknowledges that her ministrations and Dr. Cobb's diagnosis have been very beneficial to my bodily health. On the same day she records the visit of a Persian Prince, who had come to this country chiefly to see two persons, the President of the United States and Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. He also claims to be a reincarnation of some remarkable philosopher; and to be so greatly interested in the cause of Peace that he declines to visit our ships now in the harbor here, to which he has been invited. Reading Theodore Parker's sermon on Wisdom and Intellect, she found it so full of notable sayings that she thought a little familiar book of daily inspiratio
e 16, Brown University, her husband's alma mater and her grandfather's, conferred upon her the degree of Doctor of Laws. She went to Providence to receive it in person, and thus describes the commencement exercises to Mrs. Mitchell:-- The ordeal of the Doctorate was rather trying, but was made as easy as possible for me. The venerable old church was well filled, and was quite beautiful. I sat in one of the front pews--two learned people led me to the foot of the platform from which President Faunce, with some laudatory remarks, handed me my diploma, while some third party placed a picturesque hood upon my shoulders. The band played the air of my Battle Hymn, and applause followed me as I went back to my seat. So there! Her companion on that occasion writes:-- She sat listening quietly to the addresses, watched each girl and boy just starting on the voyage of life as they marched to the platform and received from the President's hand the scrap of paper, the parchment dipl
George H. Richards (search for this): chapter 32
tion from brain-fatigue takes this shape with me, and everything goes higgle-wiggledy, hi-cockalorum, or words to that effect. ... We had a delightful visit with you, dear F. G. and H. M. I miss you both, and miss the lovely panorama of the hills, and the beauteous flower parterres. Well, here's for next year in early Autumn, and I hope I may see you both before that time. With thanks for kindest entertainment, and best of love, Your very affectionate Mother and Ditto-in-law. To George H. Richards Her man of business and faithful friend. Though of her children's generation, she had adopted him as an uncle. Oak Glen, October 1, 1909. Dear Uncle George,-- I got through all right, in spite of prospective views, of fainting fits, apoplexy, what not? Trouble is now that I cannot keep calling up some thousands of people, and saying: Admire me, do. I wrote it all my little own self. Seriously, there is a little reaction from so much excitement. But I hope to recover my sense
Kuno Fischer (search for this): chapter 32
poem:-- To Laura Oak Glen, July 9, 1909. Why, yes, I'm doing the best I know how. Have written a poem for the Hudson and Fulton celebration, September 28. Worked hard at it. Guess it's only pretty good, if even that. Maud takes me out every day under the pine tree, makes me sit while she reads aloud Freeman's shorter work on Sicily. I enjoy this. ... I have just read Froude's Ceesar, which Sanborn says he hates, but which I found as readable as a novel. Am also reading a work of Kuno Fischer on Philosophy, especially relating to Descartes. Now you know, Miss, or should know, that same had great fame, and sometimes blame, as a philosopher. But he don't make no impression on my mind. I never doubted that I was, so don't need no cogito, ergo sum, which is what Carty, old Boy, amounts to. Your letter, dear, was a very proper attention under the circumstances. Should n't object to another. Lemme see! objects cannot be subjects, nor vice versa. How do you know that you washed
Humphry Ward (search for this): chapter 32
ding, all-encompassing sympathy and ever-present help, the Era of perfect love, of peace passing understanding. Mrs. Humphry Ward was in Boston this spring, and there were many pleasant festivities in her honor. A luncheon with Mrs. Humphry WMrs. Humphry Ward at Annie Fields'; very pleasant. Edward Emerson there, easy and delightful.... A fine reception at the Vendome, where she and Mrs. Ward stood under a beautiful arch of roses and exchanged greetings. A delightful call from Mrs. Humphry WarMrs. Ward stood under a beautiful arch of roses and exchanged greetings. A delightful call from Mrs. Humphry Ward. We had much talk of persons admired in England and America. She has great personal attraction, is not handsome, but very simpatica and is evidently wholesouled and sincere, with much good-fellowship. We embraced at parting. In strong contraMrs. Humphry Ward. We had much talk of persons admired in England and America. She has great personal attraction, is not handsome, but very simpatica and is evidently wholesouled and sincere, with much good-fellowship. We embraced at parting. In strong contrast to this is her comment on a writer whose work did not appeal to her. But she has merit; yes, she certainly has merit. In fact- with a flash-she is meret-ricious! May brought the Free Religious Banquet, at which she compared the difference of
Jesus Christ (search for this): chapter 32
eeded none, so deeply did he enter into life divine. I also thought, regarding Christ and Moses, that we must be content that a certain mystery should envelop these nd which has conceived and built up such splendid and immortal ideals. Was not Christ thinking of something like this when he made the sin against the Holy Ghost andwled these on a large pad. This line kept coming back to me, Living, not dying, Christ redeemed mankind. ... This my first day at my desk since Saturday, March 28. Ior diminish. I feel content that much of me should die. I interpret for myself Christ's parable of the tares sown in the wheat field. As regards the individual, thethe present. Quite suddenly, very recently, it occurred to me to consider that Christ understood that spiritual life would not end with death, and that His expressedernity! Two infants, grown to man's estate, govern the civilized world to-day, Christ and Moses. I am still thankful to be here in the flesh, as they were once, and
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