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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. Search the whole document.

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Shawsheen (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
robably was the next Captain of the trainband, of which he retained the command about forty years. He was commander-in-chief of the militia in Middlesex County during that terrible contest which is generally denominated Philip's War, or the Narragansett War, even before he attained the rank of Sergeant-major. He came from Virginia to Boston, May 20, 1644, being then styled Captain; he resided in Roxbury about years, but removed to Cambridge before April 9, 1648, when, among the lands at Shawshine, the town granted to Captain Googine a farm, if he buy a house in the town. He wrote the instructions to Captain Joseph Sill, He was a Cambridge man, and was styled Lieutenant before September 24, 1675, when he was appointed Captain of one hundred men, under Major John Pynchon. Nov. 2, 1675, to take charge of the soldiers raised from Charlestown, Watertown, and Cambridge, which are about sixty men, and to go forth against the enemy, closing thus: so desiring the ever-living Lord God to
Cambridgeport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
rved by force of arms. Among those who foresaw the peril and did not shrink from it was James P. Richardson, Esq., Great-grandson of Moses Richardson, who was slain on the day of the Lexington Battle, April 19, 1775. an attorney at law in Cambridgeport. In anticipation of the impending struggle, he issued the following notice:— The undersigned proposes to organize a company of volunteers, to tender their services to our common country, and to do what they can to maintain the integrity and glory of our flag and Union. Any citizen of good moral character and sound in body, who wishes to join the corps, will please call at my office, Main Street, Cambridgeport. J. P. Richardson. Cambridge Chronicle, Jan. 5, 1861. On the 13th of April, 1861, it was announced that sixty persons had enlisted, and that the company had been accepted by the Governor. Two days afterwards, April 15th, the President of the United States issued a proclamation, calling for 75,000 volunteers, to s
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ded John Leverett, Esq. (afterwards President of the College), who, with his associates, Col. Elisha Hutchinson and Col. Penn Townsend, received instructions from Governor Dudley, July 3, 1707, as joint commissioners for the superior command, conduct, rule and government of her majesty's forces on the expedition to Nova Scotia and L'Accadie. Mass. Arch., LXXI. 368. Andrew Belcher, previously of Cambridge, was Commissary five years before 1708. Ibid., p. 456. In the expedition against Port Royal, which sailed from Nantasket Sept. 18, 1710, Edmund Goffe was Lieut.-colonel of the regiment whereof William Tailer was Colonel and William Dudley was Major. Samuel Gookin (grandson of General Gookin) was a Lieutenant in the company commanded by Capt. Robert Handy. Ibid., p. 673. In the Minutes of Council, when raising troops for an expedition against Canada in 1711, are some memoranda concerning Cambridge men: June 20, Mr. Daniel Foxcroft spoken with to be sub-commissary in this exped
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
of Prospect Hill on the road leading from Charlestown Road to Menotomy. Colonel Sargeant's Regiment at Inman's Farm. Mass. Arch., CXLVI. 340. It is said that Gen. Putnam's Headquarters were in the Inman house. Frothingham says that during the next winter the troops were accommodated in barracks thus: At Prospect Hill, 3,464; at different places,— Number One, Inman's House, &c., 3,460; at Roxbury, 3,795; at Dorchester, 814; at Sewall's Point, 400; at Cambridge Barracks, 640; at Winter Hill, 3,380; in the College, 640; in the New College, 640; in the Old College, 240; North Chapel, 160; total, 17,633; exclusive of private houses in Cambridge. Siege of Boston, p. 291. After the 19th of April, 1775, not many important military events occurred within the borders of this town, while it was occupied by the army. A few are mentioned by Gen. Heath, who was an eye-witness: Nov. 9th. At the top of high water, the tide being very full, some British Light Infantry, in boats, c
use of Deputies, and served on many of its important committees. he returned to England near the end of 1645, was a colonel in Cromwell's army, and sacrificed his life in the service of the Commonwealth, being reported to be slain in the wars in Ireland in the year 1652. Middlesex Court Files. Lieutenant Spencer was one of the corporate members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 1638-9, in which year he removed to Connecticut, where, as well as here, he was an active and useful eral Court in October, 1645, from further attendance as a member, being to go for England. He was a Major in Cromwell's army, and very probably in Colonel Cooke's regiment. He is represented in Mitchell's Church Record, 1658, as then living in Ireland, where he probably died about 1673. It does not appear that either of these officers was engaged in the short and decisive Pequot War, which occurred shortly after they were commissioned; Cambridge furnished twelve soldiers in this expeditio
Dunstable, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
en the Province was engaged in a war with the Indians, representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
by the law and constant custom of the country to bear arms, if occasion shall require. A Brief Relation of the state of New England from the beginning of that Plantation to this present year, 1689, p. 9. But, although the private soldiers were reercifully released by death on the 3d of July. An obituary notice, eulogistic, but well merited, was published in the New England Chronicle, July 13th: On Monday the 3d instant, died of the wounds received in the late engagement, Thomas Gardner, Ese centinels on the point came off; the alarm was given; and several hundred Americans forded over the causeway, The New England Chronicle, Nov. 16, says: The tide was very full, and our men were retarded in getting to the point by being obliged ts. The war against Great Britain, which was proclaimed on the 19th of June, 1812, was unpopular in Cambridge, as in New England generally. The muster rolls are not within my reach; and I am unable to furnish a full list of volunteers who may hav
Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
the Indians, representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during these troublous times, have been preserve
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ell. William Shannon. James Sheedy. Charles S. Slate. Samuel F. Slocomb. Henry A. Smith. John Smith. Charles E. Stevens. Warren F. Stone. Michael Sullivan. Timothy Sullivan. William Tibbetts. Charles H. Titus. Edwin H. Trulan. John Vose. George W. Waters. George W. Wheelock. Henry White. John A. White. Andrew Wilson. Ninety-seven in all; but Calvin D. Peirce and Edwin H. Trulan were not mustered in until the 6th of May, after the company arrived at Fortress Monroe. At the expiration of its term of service, this company returned, and received an ovation from their fellow citizens July 23, 1861, at the City Hall. Nearly all its members reenlisted, and rendered further service to the country; and many laid down their lives in its defence. As nearly as can be ascertained, the whole number reenlisted, with only two exceptions; twenty-seven of them received commissions, and twenty-one were killed in battle, or died of wounds and disease contract
Chelmsford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ed. But their retreat toward Boston was far different. From the westerly border of Menotomy to their point of departure by Beech Street into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous point. The British loss, in this retreat, is reported to h
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