hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Henry A. Wise 103 1 Browse Search
John B. Floyd 101 1 Browse Search
John McCausland 76 8 Browse Search
John Echols 71 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 68 2 Browse Search
W. W. Averell 68 2 Browse Search
A. G. Jenkins 62 0 Browse Search
Romney (West Virginia, United States) 60 0 Browse Search
William W. Loring 60 2 Browse Search
Robert S. Garnett 55 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 678 total hits in 238 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Duke has written, Strange as the declaration may sound now, there was not one of the 6,000 or 7,000 men then gathered at Christiansburg who had entertained the slightest thought that such an event could happen. . . . That the army of Northern Virginia, with Lee at its head, would ever surrender, had never entered our minds. After a night of excitement and discussion around blazing camp-fires, part of the force proceeded under General Echols to attempt a junction with Johnston's army in North Carolina, while many returned to their homes satisfied that the war was over. Those from West Virginia who went on and those who returned, as well as those who surrendered at Appomattox and with the various commands in the Shenandoah valley, in time mainly accepted citizenship in the new State born in the throes of war, and after enduring the hardships and persecution which followed their home-coming, and the annoyances of adverse legislation, resumed the stations to which their worth entitled t
Big Sandy River (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ing in force, Early withdrew, bringing out 50 wagons and teams, 1,200 cattle, 500 sheep and 78 prisoners, again cheering the hearts of the soldiers in the Shenandoah valley. In January, 1864, Colonel Ferguson, Sixteenth Virginia cavalry, came into Wayne county, with a large part of his regiment and the Eighth cavalry, and during the remainder of the year the region between the Guyandotte and Big Sandy was practically controlled by the Confederate soldiers. Under this protection, the Big Sandy river became a channel of trade with Northern merchants. Judge H. L. Samuels, who had been prevented from holding court in Wayne under the West Virginia State government, reported that a vast quantity of useful and indispensable articles find their way to Dixie through the medium of these guerrillas. The stolen horses are laden with this contraband trade. Sympathizers land large lots of barrels and boxes from steamboats. I myself have seen seven rebels taken with their arms whose shoes we
Meadow Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ailroad bridge. Such exploits retained in this region large bodies of Federal troops sorely needed by Grant in the Wilderness. Early in May important operations began, which involved the West Virginia soldiers, but which were conducted mainly in the Shenandoah valley and southwest Virginia. Gen. U. S. Grant, ordering a forward movement in all parts of the South simultaneous with his crossing of the Rapidan, directed Sigel to move two divisions of his army down the Shenandoah valley to Cedar creek, while Averell should make a dash into southwest Virginia, destroy New river bridge, work eastward to Lynchburg if possible, and in that case return to Staunton, where Sigel would meet him with supplies. The forces under Breckinridge by two brilliant battles, one won and the other lost, defeated the full carrying out of this plan. Crook set out with his division in the last of April, marching 6,155 men by way of Fayetteville to Princeton, while Colonel Tomlinson's regiment, with Blaze
Big Sandy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
urpose in drawing attention from Witcher. In the latter part of the same month, Witcher moved into the Mud river region, and rode through Teay's valley against a garrison at Winfield, a company of the Seventh West Virginia. He sent his men into the town in two detachments, Capt. Philip J. Thurmond leading one. In the desperate fight in the streets which followed, Thurmond was mortally wounded at the head of his command. With continued audacity Witcher turned his attention to the Big Sandy river early in November, on the 5th captured and burned the United States armed steamers Barnum and Fawn at Buffalo shoals, and on the same day captured and destroyed the military stores at Mellonsburg and drove the enemy's cavalry under his guns at Louisa. At Logan Court House, a few days later, this indomitable officer reported that he had collected six companies of recruits, and had four or five other companies forming. He had increased his own battalion to a regiment, and had collected
Waynesboro, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
mailbags. The collections made by his soldiers from passengers led General Lee to order an investigation. On February 25th Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge was assigned to command of the Trans-Alleghany or western department of Virginia. The organization of the army of Western Virginia The infantry brigades of the army of Western Virginia constituted G. C. Wharton's division of Early's army of the Valley during the fall and winter of 1864-65, and suffered severely in the disaster of Waynesboro, March 2, 1865, which practically ended the career of the various commands, though a remnant of the division maintained its organization after the surrender at Appomattox. in April was as follows: Echols' infantry brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Echols: Twenty-second, Col. George S. Patton; Twenty-third, Lieut.-Col. Clarence Derrick; Twenty-sixth battalion, Lieut.-Col. George M. Edgar; partisan rangers, Capt. Philip J. Thurmond; partisan rangers, Capt. William D. Thurmond; partisan rangers, C
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
eated to Salem. His rear guard, under Averell, was defeated at Liberty, and near Salem two of his batteries were captured by the Confederate cavalry. Harassed and headed off by Early, Hunter turned toward Lewisburg, and reached Gauley bridge June 27th, moving thence to Charleston and Parkersburg, whence his army was sent back by rail to the lower Shenandoah valley. This retreat across the State was the last great military movement in West Virginia. The campaign of Early's army through Maryland against Washington and the railroad communications of Baltimore was shared by the brigades of Echols, Wharton, McCausland, Imboden and Jackson, and the batteries formerly associated with the army of Western Virginia. These commands also participated in the campaign against Sheridan in the Shenandoah valley. When General Early was advancing down the valley of Virginia on his march toward Washington, the Twentythird Virginia cavalry, under Col. Robert White, with one piece of artillery, w
Newmarket, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
Chapter 7: Operations of 1864-1865 expeditions of Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser exploits of Gilmor and McNeill organization of the army of Western Virginia battle of Cloyd's mountain Newmarket Lynchburg retreat of Hunter through West Virginia Witcher's raids– other brilliant exploits. On the last day of 1863 Maj.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee started from Mount Jackson, in a snow and rain storm, and marched to Moorefield across North mountain, where he was obliged to abandon his artillery and wagon train. He reconnoitered the Federal garrison at Petersburg and then moved toward New Creek depot, capturing a wagon train, burned the block houses at Burlington, Williamsport, and McLemar's church, and then proceeded toward the Baltimore & Ohio railroad intending to cut it, but was compelled by the sufferings of his men and the impassability of the mountains to turn back on January 5, 1864, bringing into the Shenandoah valley about 600 cattle, 300 horses and mules, and o prisoners.
Burlington, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
battle of Cloyd's mountain Newmarket Lynchburg retreat of Hunter through West Virginia Witcher's raids– other brilliant exploits. On the last day of 1863 Maj.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee started from Mount Jackson, in a snow and rain storm, and marched to Moorefield across North mountain, where he was obliged to abandon his artillery and wagon train. He reconnoitered the Federal garrison at Petersburg and then moved toward New Creek depot, capturing a wagon train, burned the block houses at Burlington, Williamsport, and McLemar's church, and then proceeded toward the Baltimore & Ohio railroad intending to cut it, but was compelled by the sufferings of his men and the impassability of the mountains to turn back on January 5, 1864, bringing into the Shenandoah valley about 600 cattle, 300 horses and mules, and o prisoners. Major Gilmor meanwhile drove the enemy out of Springfield, burned their winter quarters and brought off supplies, the main item of which was 3,000 pounds of bacon. Al
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
demarks of neighboring Ohio merchants. During this period there were no captures of Northern steamboats on the Big Sandy. During February occurred two daring exploits at opposite extremities of the State. The first was the capture of the United States steamer B. C. Levi, at Red House shoals, on the Kanawha, on the night of February 2d, by Maj. J. H. Nounnan, with less than 30 men. The Confederates quietly boarded the boat while lashed to the bank, and captured Gen. E. P. Scammon, commander the desperate fight in the streets which followed, Thurmond was mortally wounded at the head of his command. With continued audacity Witcher turned his attention to the Big Sandy river early in November, on the 5th captured and burned the United States armed steamers Barnum and Fawn at Buffalo shoals, and on the same day captured and destroyed the military stores at Mellonsburg and drove the enemy's cavalry under his guns at Louisa. At Logan Court House, a few days later, this indomitable
Moorefield (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
hugh Lee started from Mount Jackson, in a snow and rain storm, and marched to Moorefield across North mountain, where he was obliged to abandon his artillery and wago, Gilmor's and McNeill's rangers, and part of McClanahan's battery. Reaching Moorefield, Rosser was sent to intercept a train of ninety-five wagons en route from New Petersburg was severely handled on March 3d by a Confederate detachment from Moorefield. On the 10th a detachment of Mosby's men attacked the pickets at Charlestown the Confederates. Capt. John H. McNeill made an important expedition from Moorefield, May 5th, against the Baltimore & Ohio railroad at Bloomington and Piedmont. e repulsed with considerable loss. The Confederate command then proceeded to Moorefield, near where they were attacked in camp about daylight, August 7th, by Averellountered General Rosser with his own and two regiments of Payne's brigade, at Moorefield, Rosser being engaged in a little expedition of his own. The Federals escaped
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...