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Deep Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ossible, of brigading troops of the same State together. On the morning of the 11th, being called on to reinforce General Barksdale's pickets on the river, at Deep run, General Kershaw sent the Fifteenth, Colonel De Saussure, upon this duty. During the night, so bitterly cold was the weather, one of De Saussure's men was froze from Morrisville to Fredericksburg, General Hampton at once determined upon its capture. The pickets of this outpost were advanced toward Morrisville as far as Deep run, a tributary of the Rappahannock, and on the roads leading toward Warrenton. Moving from Morrisville in an arc through the country, so as to avoid the picket onnd captured them. Taking his prisoners, except those too badly wounded to be moved, General Hampton went up the road toward Morrisville, and swept the picket at Deep run, thus completing the capture of two squadrons of the enemy's cavalry. The achievement was completed by 8 o'clock. This was a brilliant morning's work. With a s
Occoquan River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e aiming to sweep up the Telegraph road and attack the garrison at Occoquan. His force, numbering 465 men, was made up of detachments from hi by dawn was at Kanky's store, on the Neabsco creek, 8 miles from Occoquan. At Kanky's a small post was surprised and captured, with eight wpeared at this juncture at Selectman's ford, 1 1/2 miles south of Occoquan, and were about to cross, but General Hampton sent Captain Clark w W. H. F. Lee was ordered to move on Dumfries, General Hampton on Occoquan, and Gen. Fitzhugh Lee on the Telegraph road between these points,ing for the night at Cole's store, General Hampton returned toward Occoquan on the 28th. At Greenwood church, General Stuart sent Butler, witthe enemy. Colonel Butler, before joining Hampton north of the Occoquan, had extricated his command on the Bacon Race road in the most skimonth, he again crossed the river with a small force, proceeded to Occoquan, surprised the pickets between that place and Dumfries, captured 5
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Jackson's, four divisions, the right wing of Lee's army. From Longstreet's left, resting on the river at Taylor hill, to Jackson's right on the wooded height at Hamilton, the divisions stood as follows: Anderson's, McLaws', Pickett's and Hood's, of Longstreet's wing; and A. P. Hill's, of Jackson's wing. Ransom's division was in ision of General Meade, supported on its right by that of General Gibbon and on its left by that of General Doubleday, advanced to the assault of the position at Hamilton's, held by A. P. Hill. Meade received the fire of McIntosh's and Pegram's, Crenshaw's and Latham's guns, which checked, then broke, and finally drove back his ahe Fifth Alabama battalion, the Twenty-second Virginia battalion, and the Forty-seventh Virginia regiment, from Archer's and Brockenbrough's brigades, came up to Hamilton's assistance, and together the Carolinians, Alabamians and Virginians charged and drove back the bold assault of Meade. Jackson sent Early forward, and a sweep
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
side of the hill and the outer margin of the Telegraph road, which winds along the foot of the hille out to capture Dumfries and operate on the Telegraph road up to the Occoquan. This would bring hpected, but Hampton proposed to sweep up the Telegraph road toward the Occoquan. In this move, hunications, this time aiming to sweep up the Telegraph road and attack the garrison at Occoquan. Haptured, with eight wagons. Sweeping up the Telegraph road Major Deloney in advance, every picket from the north side, and Deloney came up the Telegraph road with his prisoners and two captured wagey fired abundantly. At the town and on the Telegraph road, there was no decided resistance offeretuart's purpose was to operate mainly on the Telegraph road, assured of finding it at this time welred 8 loaded wagons, and their guard, on the Telegraph road; crossed the Occoquan at Selectman's fo expectation of finding loaded trains on the Telegraph road, and ascribed his ill luck to the numer[1 more...]
Neshoba (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
been raking Hill's front for hours. Stuart had held the Federal infantry advance in check, with Pelham's enfilade fire, as long as he could maintain his exposed position in front of Jackson's right, and had been forced to retire. At noon, the division of General Meade, supported on its right by that of General Gibbon and on its left by that of General Doubleday, advanced to the assault of the position at Hamilton's, held by A. P. Hill. Meade received the fire of McIntosh's and Pegram's, Crenshaw's and Latham's guns, which checked, then broke, and finally drove back his advance. Promptly reforming, Meade and Gibbon marched steadily on through the artillery fire, and rushed against Hill. Archer and Lane and Pender met the assault, and the battle was sternly contested. Meade and Gibbon pressed their attack and entered the woods in the unfortunate interval between Archer and Lane. Lane and Archer were flanked right and left. Lane gave away slowly, and Archer's left was overwhelmed
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
expectation of finding loaded trains on the Telegraph road, and ascribed his ill luck to the numerous descents upon that road by General Hampton and detachments from his command. These brilliant achievements of the cavalry were acknowledged and published in orders to the army by General Lee, as follows: General orders, no. 29. Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, February 28, 1863. The general commanding announces to the army the series of successes of the cavalry of Northern Virginia during the winter months, in spite of the obstacles of almost impassable roads, limited forage, swollen streams and inclement weather. I. About the 1st of December [November 27th] General Hampton, with a detachment of his brigade, crossed the upper Rappahannock, surprised two squadrons of Federal cavalry, captured several commissioned officers and about 100 men, with their horses, arms, colors and accouterments, without loss on his part. . . . III. On the 10th of December, Gener
Morrisville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
the river at Kelly's mill and moved northeast to Morrisville. Learning of an outpost stationed at a church 8 y on Burnside's right flank, and on the road from Morrisville to Fredericksburg, General Hampton at once determ The pickets of this outpost were advanced toward Morrisville as far as Deep run, a tributary of the Rappahanno the roads leading toward Warrenton. Moving from Morrisville in an arc through the country, so as to avoid the picket on the Morrisville road and to get between those on the other roads and the post at the church, Hamptonhe church. At 4 a. m. of the 28th, he left the Morrisville road, passed through the woods in a circuit and cbe moved, General Hampton went up the road toward Morrisville, and swept the picket at Deep run, thus completinut the loss of a man, General Hampton moved on to Morrisville and to the Rappahannock, and was in camp again by retreat on the 12th for 40 miles, he camped near Morrisville, and on the morning of the 13th, while the battle
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 9: Hampton's cavalry in the Maryland raid the battle of Fredericksburg death of Gregg South Carolinians at Mary's Hil such route as circumstances would determine. In this expedition, Hampton's brigade was in advance, and crossed at McCoy's ford by the dawn s and routed the guard, and in five minutes the ford was secured. Hampton's brigade leading, rode on rapidly, passing through the narrow strents from the brigades of Hampton, Fitzhugh Lee and W. H. F. Lee. Hampton's command was composed of 175 of the First North Carolina, under Maded wagons, with the loss of i man wounded, the first casualty in Hampton's command on his repeated expeditions. Camping for the night at C IV. On the 25th of December, General Stuart, with detachments of Hampton's, Fitz Lee's and William H. F. Lee's brigades, under the command t officer, killed. . . . . IX. . . . A detachment of 17 men of Hampton's brigade, under the brave Sergeant Michael, attacked and routed a
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e 15th began his march on the chord, while Lee took the arc. Burnside's plan was to beat Lee to Fredericksburg, cross the river on pontoons and seize the heights, and move upon Richmond from that point. The advance of Burnside's army reached Falmouth on the 17th. Colonel Ball, with a regiment of Virginia cavalry, a regiment of infantry and two batteries of artillery, prevented a crossing and held the city of Fredericksburg. On the 22d, at 8 p. m., General Lee informed President Davis by tf Davis legion, 347 from the Phillips legion, and 34 from the Second South Carolina, a force of 208 men, Hampton crossed the river at Kelly's mill and moved northeast to Morrisville. Learning of an outpost stationed at a church 8 miles east of Falmouth, immediately on Burnside's right flank, and on the road from Morrisville to Fredericksburg, General Hampton at once determined upon its capture. The pickets of this outpost were advanced toward Morrisville as far as Deep run, a tributary of the
Kelly's Mill (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
g, before the battle, Longstreet being already in position and Jackson halted at Orange Court House, General Hampton crossed the Rappahannock and made a brilliant dash into the enemy's lines, capturing an outpost on his immediate right flank. On the morning of November 27th, with 50 men from the First North Carolina, 50 from the Cobb legion, 40 from the Jeff Davis legion, 347 from the Phillips legion, and 34 from the Second South Carolina, a force of 208 men, Hampton crossed the river at Kelly's mill and moved northeast to Morrisville. Learning of an outpost stationed at a church 8 miles east of Falmouth, immediately on Burnside's right flank, and on the road from Morrisville to Fredericksburg, General Hampton at once determined upon its capture. The pickets of this outpost were advanced toward Morrisville as far as Deep run, a tributary of the Rappahannock, and on the roads leading toward Warrenton. Moving from Morrisville in an arc through the country, so as to avoid the picket
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