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Keith (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Kershaw was marching from Ringgold for Alexander's bridge, General Gist was marching from Catoosa Station for the same point, having arrived from Rome with part of the Forty-sixth Georgia, the Twenty-fourth South Carolina and the Eighth Georgia battalion; the Sixteenth South Carolina and Ferguson's battery awaiting transportation at Rome, with the remainder of the Forty-sixth Georgia. General Gist had under his charge an ammunition train which delayed his march and prevented his leaving Catoosa before 10 p. m. on the 19th. After an all-night march Gist crossed Alexander's bridge at sunrise, halted a mile beyond, and after a brief rest was directed to the right to join Walker, arriving about 9 o'clock. General Walker at once assigned Gist to the command of his division (Ector, Wilson and Gist), and Gist's brigade was commanded by the senior officer, Col. P. H. Colquitt, Forty-sixth Georgia. Kershaw marched his own and Humphreys' brigades to the left and took position in support o
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 17
Chapter 16: South Carolinians at Chickamauga organization of the armies South Carolinians engaged their heroic service and sacrifices. The armies of Generals Bragg and Rosecrans, which were to fight the battle of Chickamauga on the 19th and 20th of September, 1863, were widely separated in the early part of August, Bragg at Chattanooga and Rosecrans beyond the Cumberland mountains, with the Tennessee river rolling between them. About the middle of August, the Federal general broke up his encampments and moved his army across the mountains to the Tennessee. Crittenden's corps threatened Chattanooga through the gaps in Walden's ridge, while Thomas' corps and McCook's moved to Stevenson, Bridgeport and the vicinity. Rosecrans established his depot at Stevenson and passed his army over the river on pontoons, rafts and boats, and boldly crossed Sand mountain to Trenton. He was on the flank of General Bragg by the 8th of September, and by the 12th had crossed Lookout
Pigeon Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
from Bragg's headquarters, with the Chickamauga between himself and Thomas, and by road at least 20 miles from that general's support. McCook was fully as far from Thomas on the other flank. It was therefore a matter of life and death (says Rosecrans in his report) to effect the concentration of the army. Crittenden marched across Bragg's right, passed the Chickamauga and moved down toward Thomas, and Mc-Cook marched up from Alpine toward that general's position in McLemore's cove. Pigeon mountain range covered McCook and Thomas; but Crittenden's march was open to attack. His corps should have been beaten and driven off toward Chattanooga. General Bragg clearly saw this and endeavored to strike Crittenden at the proper moment, giving explicit orders to that effect. These orders were not executed, the opportunity passed, and Rosecrans united his corps on the west side of the Chickamauga, while Bragg confronted him on the east. The great battles of the 19th and 20th of Septembe
J. C. Palmer (search for this): chapter 17
hange front to the left, and was instantly wounded and disabled, his horse being shot. Lieutenant-Colonel Capers executed the change of front and directed the fire of the Twenty-fourth in reply. The gallant adjutant of the Twenty-fourth, Lieut. J. C. Palmer, fell pierced through the head. Then Maj. J. S. Jones was badly wounded, and in bringing up his right to form on the Twenty-fourth and Eighth Georgia, Colquitt fell. The assault was ordered, and while leading it Lieutenant-Colonel Caperse had better luck. Reinforced by the absent companies of the Forty-sixth Georgia to 1,400 strong, Napier led the brigade in the glorious battle of the right wing and had the happiness to follow the broken and routed columns of Baird, Johnson and Palmer, until night came to give rest and sleep to men who had enjoyed none since leaving Rome on the early morning of the 18th. In the struggle before Baird's position, which lasted not more than forty minutes, the Twenty-fourth South Carolina lost
John S. Hard (search for this): chapter 17
. Kershaw lost 488 killed and wounded; Manigault 539, and the Twenty-fourth South Carolina (Gist's brigade) 169; a total of 1,196. Lieut.-Col. Elbert Bland, Seventh South Carolina, fell at the head of his regiment, and a few moments later Maj. John S. Hard, his successor, was instantly killed. Capt. J. M. Townsend, commanding the Third battalion, Lieut.-Col. Hoole, Eighth regiment, and Capt. W. A. Williams, acting major of the Third, were killed in the gallant performance of duty. Capt. D. nodgrass hill, and others of that gallant brigade sealed their devotion to duty with their heart's blood. In the report of General Kershaw, the following officers are mentioned for gallant and noteworthy conduct: Lieutenant-Colonel Bland and Major Hard of the Seventh; Captain Townsend of the Third battalion; Col. James D. Nance of the Third regiment; Lieut.-Col. Franklin Gaillard of the Second; Col. John W. Henagan of the Eighth, and Col. Joseph F. Gist of the Fifteenth; Capts. C. R. Holmes,
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 17
4 batteries; Preston's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Johnson's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Longstreet's corpsCook commanding: Davis' division, 3 brigades, 5 batteries; Johnson's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Sheridan's division, now reinforced his battle by Reynolds, and McCook sent in Johnson's division. Walker, coming up with Liddell's two brigadesrom right to left as follows: Stewart (touching Cleburne), Johnson, Hood, McLaws, Hindman and Preston. The line of the Confelpeper's South Carolina battery was with McNair's brigade, Johnson's division. The province of the writer does not permit appiness to follow the broken and routed columns of Baird, Johnson and Palmer, until night came to give rest and sleep to menlly, from Preston's; McNair, with Culpeper's battery, from Johnson's; Anderson from Hindman's, and Law from Hood's, with Kersdgrass, while Hindman with Manigault's and Deas' brigades, Johnson with Gregg's, and Preston with Trigg's, attacked the west
Robert Martin (search for this): chapter 17
's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Johnson's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Longstreet's corps, Major-General Hood: McLaws' division, 2 brigades; Hood's division, 3 brigades; Hindman's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Reserve artillery, 5 batteries. Total of wing, 6 divisions, 17 brigades, 17 batteries. Total in both wings, 11 divisions, 33 brigades, 33 batteries. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Wheeler, operating on Bragg's left: Wharton's division, 2 brigades, 1 battery; Martin's division, 2 brigades, 1 battery. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Forrest, operating on Bragg's right: Armstrong's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries; Pegram's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Total of cavalry, 4 divisions, 8 brigades, 6 batteries. Rosecrans' army. Fourteenth corps, Major-General Thomas commanding: Baird's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Negley's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Brannan's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Reynolds' division, 3 brigades, 3
gades, 1 battery. Corps of cavalry, Major-General Forrest, operating on Bragg's right: Armstrong. At Jay's mill, near the bridge, Brannan met Forrest, and the battle of the 19th was opened. ForrForrest pushed Brannan back, the latter was reinforced by Baird's division, and Walker (marching from Alexander's bridge toward Forrest's battle) sent two of his brigades, Ector's and Wilson's, to ForreForrest's support. Brannan and Baird were driving Forrest back to Jay's mill when Ector and Wilson cameForrest back to Jay's mill when Ector and Wilson came up, and then in turn Baird and Brannan were driven, artillery and prisoners captured. Thomas now , Baird and Brannan were checking and holding Forrest. General Bragg sent up Cheatham's divisionlker, and were handsomely repulsed; meanwhile Forrest holding fast the right. Finally, near night,art, six divisions of eighteen brigades, with Forrest's cavalry, had been squarely in action. Thr did not arrive until II p. m. on the 19th. Forrest was well out on the right, in front of McDona[3 more...]
H. L. Farley (search for this): chapter 17
ss hill, and others of that gallant brigade sealed their devotion to duty with their heart's blood. In the report of General Kershaw, the following officers are mentioned for gallant and noteworthy conduct: Lieutenant-Colonel Bland and Major Hard of the Seventh; Captain Townsend of the Third battalion; Col. James D. Nance of the Third regiment; Lieut.-Col. Franklin Gaillard of the Second; Col. John W. Henagan of the Eighth, and Col. Joseph F. Gist of the Fifteenth; Capts. C. R. Holmes, H. L. Farley, and W. M. Dwight of the brigade staff, and Couriers M. F. Milam, Company A, Third battalion, and Rawlins Rivers, Company I, Second regiment; both killed carrying General Kershaw's orders on the field. General Gist mentioned Maj. B. B. Smith, Capt. M. P. King, and Lieuts. L. M. Butler and J. C. Habersham, of his staff, for efficiency and gallant conduct; Col. C. H. Stevens and Lieut.-Col. Ellison Capers, Twenty-fourth, for the same; and Adjt. J. O. Palmer and Capt. D. F. Hill, of the T
Francis G. Palmer (search for this): chapter 17
commanding: Davis' division, 3 brigades, 5 batteries; Johnson's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Sheridan's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries. Twenty-first corps, Major-General Crittenden commanding: Wood's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries; Palmer's division, 3 brigades, 4 batteries; Van Cleve's division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries. Reserve corps, Major-General Granger commanding: One division, 3 brigades, 3 batteries. Total, II divisions, 33 brigades, 36 batteries. Cavalry corps, Brattle by Reynolds, and McCook sent in Johnson's division. Walker, coming up with Liddell's two brigades, took command of the battle and attacked vigorously with Forrest and his four brigades, driving Reynolds, on the Federal right, in rout; but Palmer's division sent by Crittenden to reinforce Thomas, met and drove Walker back. Meanwhile, Baird and Brannan were checking and holding Forrest. General Bragg sent up Cheatham's division on Walker's left, and Thomas moved Brannan from his left t
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