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Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ted to a greater test of the depth and strength of their sentiments, or put to a severer trial of their patriotism, than were the planters and their families, who abandoned their houses and estates along the coast of South Carolina, and retired as refugees into the interior, all the men who were able entering the army. At the time of the fall of Forts Walker and Beauregard, Charleston harbor was defended by Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Castle Pinckney and Fort Johnson, and by batteries on Sullivan's and Morris islands. All these were to be strengthened, and the harbor made secure against any attack in front. To prevent the occupation of James island, the mouth of Stono river was defended by forts built on Cole's and Battery islands, and a line of defensive works built across the island. No attempt had been made to erect forts or batteries in defense of the inlets of Worth or South Edisto, but the harbor of Georgetown was protected by works unfinished on Cat and South islands, for t
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ly reliable, that the enemy's expedition is intended for Port Royal. Governor Pickens answered: Please telegraph General An heaviest weight of metal. In planning the defense of Port Royal, General Beauregard designed that batteries of 10-inch cleft the islands of Hilton Head, St. Helena, Ladies, and Port Royal, and the beautiful estates of the planters were at the mxposed points, while larger vessels attacked them, as at Port Royal, in front. It was evident that the rich islands of the ny point or on any island selected. On the capture of Port Royal, it was uncertain, of course, what General Sherman's plat was attacked. On the 8th of November, the day after Port Royal was taken, Gen. Robert E. Lee took command of the depart headquarters at Adams' run; the Fourth, from Ashepoo to Port Royal entrance, under Gen. J. C. Pemberton, with headquarters he mercy of the fleet, but there was no help for it, for Port Royal had shown that the guns which the Confederates could com
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e to the secretary of war at Richmond about the time of the Federal expedition to North Carolina, and the capture of the batteries at Hatteras inlet, urgently requesting that Gregg's First regiment might be sent him from Virginia, as he expected an attack to be made at some point on the coast. In this letter he begged that 40,000 pounds of cannon powder be forwarded from Norfolk at once. The governor had bought in December, 1860, and January, 1861 , 300,000 pounds from Hazard's mills in Connecticut, for the use of the State, but he had loaned 25,000 pounds to the governor of North Carolina, 5,000 pounds to the governor of Florida, and a large amount to the governor of Tennessee. Of what remained he needed 40,000 pounds to supply about 100 guns on the coast below Charleston. The governor estimated the troops in the forts and on the islands around Charleston at 1,800 men, all well drilled, and a reserve force in the city of 3,000. These forces, with Manigault's, Heyward's, Dunovan
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
is islands. All these were to be strengthened, and the harbor made secure against any attack in front. To prevent the occupation of James island, the mouth of Stono river was defended by forts built on Cole's and Battery islands, and a line of defensive works built across the island. No attempt had been made to erect forts or ba including the garrisons of the forts at Georgetown and those of Moultrie, Sumter, Johnson, Castle Pinckney and the works for the defense of the approaches through Stono, Wappoo, etc., which could not be removed from their posts, amounted to 10,036 Confederate troops—the Fourth brigade, South Carolina militia, 1,531 strong; ColonelGeneral Pemberton, on assuming command, executed General Lee's purpose and ordered the removal of the guns from Fort Palmetto on Cole's island, at the mouth of the Stono, and from the works at the mouth of Georgetown harbor. Georgetown was then at the mercy of the fleet, but there was no help for it, for Port Royal had shown that
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
and equip troops for State and Confederate service. Governor Pickens wrote to the secretary of war at Richmond about the time of the Federal expedition to North Carolina, and the capture of the batteries at Hatteras inlet, urgently requesting that Gregg's First regiment might be sent him from Virginia, as he expected an attackber, 1860, and January, 1861 , 300,000 pounds from Hazard's mills in Connecticut, for the use of the State, but he had loaned 25,000 pounds to the governor of North Carolina, 5,000 pounds to the governor of Florida, and a large amount to the governor of Tennessee. Of what remained he needed 40,000 pounds to supply about 100 gunsunted to 10,036 Confederate troops—the Fourth brigade, South Carolina militia, 1,531 strong; Colonel Martin's mounted regiment, 567 strong; two regiments from North Carolina, Clingman's and Radcliffe's; two regiments from Tennessee, the Eighth and Sixteenth, and Colonel Starke's Virginia regiment; the Tennesseeans and Virginians m
South Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
was defended by Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Castle Pinckney and Fort Johnson, and by batteries on Sullivan's and Morris islands. All these were to be strengthened, and the harbor made secure against any attack in front. To prevent the occupation of James island, the mouth of Stono river was defended by forts built on Cole's and Battery islands, and a line of defensive works built across the island. No attempt had been made to erect forts or batteries in defense of the inlets of Worth or South Edisto, but the harbor of Georgetown was protected by works unfinished on Cat and South islands, for twenty guns, the heaviest of which were 32-pounders. When General Lee took command, November 8th, he established his headquarters at Coosawhatchie, and divided the line of defense into five military districts, from east to west, as follows: The First, from the North Carolina line to the South Santee, under Col. A. M. Manigault, Tenth volunteers, with headquarters at Georgetown; the Second, fr
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ies on Sullivan's and Morris islands. All these were to be strengthened, and the harbor made secure against any attack in front. To prevent the occupation of James island, the mouth of Stono river was defended by forts built on Cole's and Battery islands, and a line of defensive works built across the island. No attempt had bee shown that the guns which the Confederates could command were practically inefficient against the batteries of the fleet. For the rear defense of Charleston, James island must be the battleground, and the forces on the mainland, along the line of the Charleston & Savannah railroad, must depend upon rapid concentration to resist ned the harbor defenses, and Ripley's energy and high capacity were constantly exerted to secure a perfect defense of the city of Charleston. The troops on James island and on the line of railroad, as reported April 30, 1862, present for duty, numbered 2,275, rank and file, stationed as follows: In the First district, Col. R.
Coosawhatchie, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e Rutledge Riflemen, were stationed in front of Grahamville, to watch the landings from the Broad. Colonel Edwards' regiment and Moore's light battery were at Coosawhatchie, Colonel Dunovant's at Pocotaligo, and Colonel Jones', with Tripp's company of cavalry, in front of the important landing at Port Royal ferry. Colonel Martin, and South islands, for twenty guns, the heaviest of which were 32-pounders. When General Lee took command, November 8th, he established his headquarters at Coosawhatchie, and divided the line of defense into five military districts, from east to west, as follows: The First, from the North Carolina line to the South Santee, undpoo, under Gen. N. G. Evans, with headquarters at Adams' run; the Fourth, from Ashepoo to Port Royal entrance, under Gen. J. C. Pemberton, with headquarters at Coosawhatchie; the Fifth, the remainder of the line to the Savannah river, under Gen. T. F. Drayton, with headquarters at Hardeeville. On the 27th of December, General Le
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
tions and batteries on the coast, and to arm and equip troops for State and Confederate service. Governor Pickens wrote to the secretary of war at Richmond about the time of the Federal expedition to North Carolina, and the capture of the batteries at Hatteras inlet, urgently requesting that Gregg's First regiment might be sent him from Virginia, as he expected an attack to be made at some point on the coast. In this letter he begged that 40,000 pounds of cannon powder be forwarded from Norfolk at once. The governor had bought in December, 1860, and January, 1861 , 300,000 pounds from Hazard's mills in Connecticut, for the use of the State, but he had loaned 25,000 pounds to the governor of North Carolina, 5,000 pounds to the governor of Florida, and a large amount to the governor of Tennessee. Of what remained he needed 40,000 pounds to supply about 100 guns on the coast below Charleston. The governor estimated the troops in the forts and on the islands around Charleston at 1
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
1, 1861 , they were ready for the guns. Fort Walker mounted twenty guns and Fort Beauregard ninnth South Carolina volunteers, commanded at Fort Walker, and Col. R. G. M. Dunovant, of the TwelfthCapt. I. H. Screven. The fighting force of Fort Walker then, on the morning of the 7th of Novemberd vicinity. He removed his headquarters to Hilton Head on the 5th, and pushed forward every preparn of the leading battleships of the enemy. Fort Walker, however, received just before the engageme batteries, dismounted or disabled most of Fort Walker's guns. The 10-inch columbiad was disabledbe abandoned. Thus terminated the fight at Fort Walker. At Fort Beauregard, the battle went morton successfully conducted his retreat from Hilton Head, and Colonel Dunovant from Bay point, all tneral Sherman wrote to his government, from Hilton Head, that the effect of his victory was startliry white inhabitant had left the islands of Hilton Head, St. Helena, Ladies, and Port Royal, and th
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