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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
orders of the United States, must be withdrawn. The arsenal, situated near Augusta, consisting of a group of buildings on the summits of salubrious sand-hills, cdepartment. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Augusta, and was very nigh producing serious difficulties in this quarter, the people e following complete report of the surrender of the United States arsenal at Augusta, Ga.: On the morning of the 23d of January I received from the governor of Georgia, then in Augusta, backed by a superior force of State troops numbering some 600 or 700, a verbal demand of the arsenal, which I refused. Shortly after came thrcellency the governor of Georgia, having demanded the United States arsenal at Augusta, commanded by Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second artillery, United States army, the foers of the city were put under arms, and others came in from the country. The Augusta volunteers engaged in the capture of the arsenal consisted of the following co
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ry, as the governor should decide. The organization of these regiments had not been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The f
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s, seven and a half feet thick, rose twenty-five feet above high water, mounting one tier of guns in casemates and one in barbette. The gorge face was covered by a demi-lune of good relief, arranged for one tier of guns in barbette, and was also provided with a ditch. The marshy formation, Cockspur island, on which Pulaski stood, was surrounded by broad channels of deep water, and the only near approach to it, on ground of tolerable firmness, was along a narrow strip of shifting sand on Tybee island. The people of Savannah, familiar with the situation, thought they were menaced by a danger as great as that of Sumter to Charleston; that even a few days' delay might permit this isolated fort to be made effective in closing the main seaport of Georgia, and that once strongly manned, it would be impossible to reduce it with ordnance such as could soon be obtained by the State. Capt. William H. C. Whiting, of the United States army engineers, who had an office in Savannah at that time
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
was celebrated with great fervor by the people of Savannah, and public meetings held at various other places expressed a warm approval. The State convention, meeting two weeks later, by resolution sustained the governor in his energetic and patriotic conduct, and requested him to retain possession of the fort until the relations of Georgia and the Federal government should be determined. Having telegraphed advices of what he had done to the governors of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, Governor Brown soon had the satisfaction of receiving the endorsement of similar action on their part. On the day following the occupation of Fort Pulaski, the officers of the volunteer companies of Macon, Capts. R. A. Smith, E. Fitzgerald, T. M. Parker, L. M. Lamar, E. Smith and Lieut. W. H. Ross, telegraphed the governor, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the
Amelia Island (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
of Savannah, familiar with the situation, thought they were menaced by a danger as great as that of Sumter to Charleston; that even a few days' delay might permit this isolated fort to be made effective in closing the main seaport of Georgia, and that once strongly manned, it would be impossible to reduce it with ordnance such as could soon be obtained by the State. Capt. William H. C. Whiting, of the United States army engineers, who had an office in Savannah at that time, was absent at Fort Clinch, on the St. Mary's, and Ordnance-Sergeant Walker with a fort keeper was in charge at the works; only twenty guns were in the fort and the supply of ammunition was meager. Governor Brown, being advised of the situation at Savannah, and of the probability that Pulaski and Jackson would be seized by the people, visited the city, and after consultation with the citizens took the appropriate step of ordering an immediate occupation. The earnest spirit of the citizens of Savannah was manifes
Savannah River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the United States garrison of Fort Moultrie in abandoning that exposed position and taking possession of Fort Sumter, where, isolated from land approach and nearer the open sea, reinforcements and provisions might be expected and resistance made to the demand of the State for the relinquishment of its territory. On the Georgia coast there were two United States forts, Jackson and Pulaski, near Savannah. One of these, Fort Pulaski, was situated (similarly to Sumter) at the mouth of the Savannah river, on Tybee Roads. It could be supplied with troops and munitions from the sea with little risk, and once properly manned and equipped would, in the judgment of military experts, be practically impregnable. A few months later the chief engineer of the United States army expressed the opinion that the work could not be reduced in a month's firing with any-number of manageable calibers. The fort was of brick, with five faces, casemated on all sides, and surrounded by a ditch filled with w
Edgefield, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
llowing companies: Oglethorpe Infantry, Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, Montgomery Guards, two companies of minute men (one of which became the Walker Light Infantry), Washington Artillery and Richmond Hussars. The ranks of these companies had been swelled by young men eager to serve their country, until they averaged 100 men each. They were splendidly equipped and thoroughly drilled. In addition to these there were about 200 mounted men from Burke county and a company of infantry from Edgefield district, South Carolina. Brigadier-General Harris was in chief command, aided by Brig.-Gen. Charles J. Williams, of Columbus; and Lieut.-Col. Alfred Cumming was in immediate command of the armed force, consisting of the Augusta battalion, Companies A and B of the minute men, and the militia. No hostile demonstration was to be made until the 24th, and it was then happily obviated by the reasonable action of Captain Elzey. In the conference which fixed the terms of the withdrawal, the gov
Burke (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
capture of the arsenal consisted of the following companies: Oglethorpe Infantry, Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, Montgomery Guards, two companies of minute men (one of which became the Walker Light Infantry), Washington Artillery and Richmond Hussars. The ranks of these companies had been swelled by young men eager to serve their country, until they averaged 100 men each. They were splendidly equipped and thoroughly drilled. In addition to these there were about 200 mounted men from Burke county and a company of infantry from Edgefield district, South Carolina. Brigadier-General Harris was in chief command, aided by Brig.-Gen. Charles J. Williams, of Columbus; and Lieut.-Col. Alfred Cumming was in immediate command of the armed force, consisting of the Augusta battalion, Companies A and B of the minute men, and the militia. No hostile demonstration was to be made until the 24th, and it was then happily obviated by the reasonable action of Captain Elzey. In the conference which
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
g of a group of buildings on the summits of salubrious sand-hills, contained a battery of artillery, 20,000 stand of muskets, and a large quantity of munitions, guarded by a company of United States troops under command of Capt. Arnold Elzey, of Maryland. The occupation of this arsenal was necessary. The sentiment favoring the seizure was increased by the arrival, on January 10th, of an ordnance detachment, which had been ordered by Col. H. K. Craig, chief of ordnance at Washington, to report istinguished for his reckless daring, and finally gave his life in the great battle on the hills of Atlanta. Elzey also entered the Confederate service as soon as circumstances permitted, and was one of the most distinguished representatives of Maryland in the army of Northern Virginia. His cool and intrepid action on the field of First Manassas won for him the rank of brigadier-general and the title of the Blucher of the day from the lips of President Davis. Under Jackson he achieved additio
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
rs of the volunteer companies of Macon, Capts. R. A. Smith, E. Fitzgerald, T. M. Parker, L. M. Lamar, E. Smith and Lieut. W. H. Ross, telegraphed the governor, asking if he would sanction the movement of Georgia volunteers going to the aid of South Carolina; but this generous impulse was very properly checked, pending the action of the State convention. By act of the legislature, a sovereign convention had been summoned to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action toby the arrival, on January 10th, of an ordnance detachment, which had been ordered by Col. H. K. Craig, chief of ordnance at Washington, to report at that place after it had been ejected from the Charleston arsenal by the State authorities of South Carolina. Captain Elzey, in his report to Washington of the transfer, said: This movement on the part of Colonel Craig I believe to be wholly unauthorized by the war department. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Au
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