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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ttached to the command of Gen. Danville Lead-better in east Tennessee, and brought to Chattanooga when that point was threatage. In the campaign under Bragg through Kentucky and Tennessee, undertaken to protect Chattanooga and Atlanta by carryinavalry regiments were earning their spurs with Forrest in Tennessee. Part of the First, under Col. J. J. Morrison, and the So take a force of infantry and march against a band of east Tennessee Unionists, who had assembled under Col. William Clift Georgia battalion under Maj. H. D. Capers. On the way to Tennessee most of the horses were killed in a railroad accident. O 4 wounded. General Maney, commanding the brigade of four Tennessee regiments and the Forty-first Georgia, said in his report Chickasaw bayou, a brigade of Georgians, organized in east Tennessee under Gen. Seth M. Barton, and thence transferred to Mon of Georgia artillery, Maj. A. Leyden, was taking part in the operations in east Tennessee under Gen. Humphrey Marshall.
Chickasaw Bayou (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 5: Battle of Shiloh Andrews' raid the Third infantry at South Mills the conscript act and State troops Georgians under Bragg and Kirby Smith naval affairs depredations in the coast region war Legislation Chickasaw Bayou and Murfreesboro. Georgia appears with credit at the famous battle of Shiloh April 6 and 7, 1862, by two commands, the Washington Light Artillery, Capt. Isadore P. Girardey, and the Mountain Dragoons, Capt. I. W. Avery; and among the general offic, the victor's spoils should be alone a heap of ashes. The military history of the West for 1862 closes with two famous battles, almost simultaneous—one on the Vicksburg line of defenses, the other between Nashville and Chattanooga. At Chickasaw bayou, a brigade of Georgians, organized in east Tennessee under Gen. Seth M. Barton, and thence transferred to Mississippi to meet the invasions under Grant and Sherman, took a conspicuous part in the defeat of Sherman by the Confederate forces u
Munfordville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
captain, winning the commendatory notice of General Maxey, the officer in command. The Third Georgia cavalry, Col. Martin J. Crawford, accompanied Gen. Joseph Wheeler in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and fought gallantly and suffered severely at Munfordville; but at New Haven, Ky., September 29th, Colonel Crawford and about 250 of his command were surprised and captured by a detachment of Col. E. M. McCook's cavalry brigade. On August 10, 1862, Gen. E. Kirby Smith ordered Col. Archibald Gracie,a. The foregoing troops were all in Gen. Kirby Smith's army. In Polk's wing of Bragg's army in Kentucky there were other Georgia commands. In Withers' division the Fifth Georgia shared in what was to the infantry the bloodless victory at Munfordville, Ky.; while at Perryville the Forty-first Georgia was in Cheatham's division in the thickest of the fight, its gallant colonel, Charles A. Mc-Daniel, being mortally wounded, and Maj. John Knight leading it through the rest of the battle. The re
Mount Vernon (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s, assailed the second camp of the enemy. Said Forrest: The Georgians, under Colonel Dunlop and Major Harper, made a gallant charge almost to the mouth of the cannon. After fighting them in front two or three hours I took immediate command of this force and charged the rear of the enemy into their camps and burned their camps and stores, demoralizing their force and weakening their strength. In the following month Colonel Morrison was sent with his troops into Kentucky to occupy Mount Vernon, and at Big Hill he defeated an attack of Federal cavalry, August 23d. At Bridgeport, Ala., August 27th, the Jackson artillery, under Capt. G. A. Dure, did brilliant work, Lieutenant Holtzclaw, as well as the captain, winning the commendatory notice of General Maxey, the officer in command. The Third Georgia cavalry, Col. Martin J. Crawford, accompanied Gen. Joseph Wheeler in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and fought gallantly and suffered severely at Munfordville; but at New Haven, Ky., S
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ed cruiser Nashville ran the blockade into Savannah with a cargo of arms. This vessel was the first commissioned armed cruiser of the Confederate States, and had been purchased with the original intention of using her to convey abroad the commissioners, Mason and Slidell. After she entered the river in the summer of 1862, the rigor of the blockade kept her useless until her destruction, early in 1863. In August the steamer Emma, which had several times run the blockade, carrying cotton to Nassau, while trying to make the outward passage on a dark and stormy night, ran aground off the southeast extremity of Jones island. The crew got off in boats and made their escape up the river to Savannah, though pursued for some distance by boats from Fort Pulaski. Before leaving the vessel the crew set her on fire, and she was totally consumed. It was thought by the Federals that her intention was to go to sea by a route which was known to be practicable, namely, after running under the fire
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Head, Put the officers and crew of the rebel steamer in close confinement in the fort. On the following day the boat and crew were sent back to Savannah, with a message from Hunter that the presence of three officers on the Lee was a suspicious circumstance, and that hereafter only one officer should accompany a flag of truce. In July, 1862, the armed cruiser Nashville ran the blockade into Savannah with a cargo of arms. This vessel was the first commissioned armed cruiser of the Confederate States, and had been purchased with the original intention of using her to convey abroad the commissioners, Mason and Slidell. After she entered the river in the summer of 1862, the rigor of the blockade kept her useless until her destruction, early in 1863. In August the steamer Emma, which had several times run the blockade, carrying cotton to Nassau, while trying to make the outward passage on a dark and stormy night, ran aground off the southeast extremity of Jones island. The crew got
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
volunteered for the expedition with knowledge of its character were tried as spies, convicted on evidence and ordered to be executed. The others who had become implicated through the orders of their superior officers were held in confinement at Atlanta. Finally some escaped and others were exchanged. Some very absurd conjectures as to what would have been the result of the success of Andrews' scheme were indulged in by sensational writers on both sides, but a Federal officer has recorded tation, in connection with the smaller number of Confederate troops near, saved the city from attack and capture, without bloodshed and carnage. In the campaign under Bragg through Kentucky and Tennessee, undertaken to protect Chattanooga and Atlanta by carrying the war into the enemy's country, or in that direction, some of the Georgia troops acted a gallant and conspicuous part. The First regiment of partisan rangers, Col. A. A. Hunt, participated in the first Kentucky raid of that famou
Cynthiana, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
partisan rangers, Col. A. A. Hunt, participated in the first Kentucky raid of that famous cavalry leader, John H. Morgan, then colonel of the Second Kentucky cavalry. At Tompkinsville, on the night of July 8th, a considerable body of the enemy's cavalry was charged and stampeded; but Colonel Hunt, while leading gallantly in the assault, received a severe wound in the leg, which prevented his going on with the command. Morgan and his men pushed on to Georgetown, and on the 17th captured Cynthiana, with 420 prisoners. The Georgia troopers, under command of Lieut.-Col. F. M. Nix, acted a prominent part in this brilliant affair; Captain Jones, of Company A, and Maj. Samuel J. Winn being especially distinguished among the officers. At the same time the First and Second Georgia cavalry regiments were earning their spurs with Forrest in Tennessee. Part of the First, under Col. J. J. Morrison, and the Second, under Col. W. J. Lawton, with Colonel Wharton's Texas rangers, formed the ma
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
action to Avery's troop, but it rendered efficient and arduous service as the advance guard of Hindman's division in the march to the field, and during the terrible storm of the night preceding the battle it was on advanced picket duty. It was under heavy fire at times on both days of the conflict, but was not actively engaged. Subsequent to the battle of Shiloh, the Fifth Georgia infantry, Gen. J. K. Jackson's old regiment, was attached to his brigade, which was otherwise composed of Alabama regiments. The Thirty-sixth, Thirty-ninth and Forty-third were attached to the command of Gen. Danville Lead-better in east Tennessee, and brought to Chattanooga when that point was threatened. Toward the latter part of April, 450 men of these Georgia regiments under Lead-better opposed the advance of the Federals at Bridgeport. The Forty-first, in the brigade of S. B. Maxey, was at Corinth during the siege by Halleck. The proximity of the Federal forces to the northern part of the St
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ould have produced no important effect upon Mitchel's military operations, and that he would not have taken, certainly would not have held, Chattanooga. . . . Hence, concludes the officer, it is my opinion that Mitchel's bridge burners took desperate chances to accomplish objects of no substantial advantage. In the same month of April, the Third Georgia infantry, Col. A. R. Wright, was distinguished in the fight at South Mills, N. C., on the 19th. The regiment had been withdrawn from Roanoke island in time to escape inevitable capture, and now met the Federals as they advanced northward along the Pasquotank river. With three companies of his regiment and a battery, Wright selected an advantageous position, and finding a deep, wide ditch in his front, adopted the novel expedient of filling it with fence rails and burning them to make the ditch impassable, or at least not available as an intrenchment. Before the enemy arrived Wright was reinforced by seven companies, and he made a
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