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Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Charles E. Fenner's with Hood's. When Polk's army of Mississippi joined that of Tennessee at Resaca it brought a brigade under command of Col. Thomas M. Scott, of the Twelfth regiment (that regimeing of his line, assisted by Fenner's battery, in Mill Creek gap, till ordered to the south. At Resaca the brigade made two charges, and on the retreat from there they were assigned to the rear guard 13 wounded. Said General Gibson: Capt. E. J. Blasco, Thirteenth, was killed in the charge at Resaca. He was a modest, skillful and brave young man, who had served with me from the beginning of thsts. Lieut.-Col. J. McEnery, commanding Fourth battalion, was severely wounded in the charge at Resaca; Maj. S. L. Bishop, commanding Twentieth regiment, lost his right arm in front of New Hope churc, wounded. Capt. Robert L. Keen was now in command of the Twentieth. Scott's brigade reached Resaca May 10th, when Mc-Pherson's corps was four miles distant, intent on cutting off the retreat of J
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Chapter 18: The Georgia campaign Louisiana commands with Johnston and Polk their service from Dalton to Atlanta the siege battle of Jonesboro General Hood Withdraws to Alabama. In November, 1863, Grant, victorious at Vicksburg, appeared at Chattanooga, where the Federal army was beleaguered by Bragg on Missionary ridge and Lookout mountain. Grant's prompt decision was that Bragg must be driven from the position he had chosen. For that work he selected well his lieutenants, Sherman, Thomas and Hooker, and they did it successfully. Bragg, always fighting valiantly, but ever face to face with a stronger enemy, never once possessing men enough, assailing or assailed, to mass against a compact foe, saw himself worsted at every point. He found it necessary to retreat to Ringgold, which he did on November 26, 1863. Here he was soon after relieved from command by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, and called to Richmond to serve as President Davis' chief of staff. Johnston as
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
reak it. The Twelfth Louisiana, at the battle of the 20th of July, lost II killed, 57 wounded, and 4 missing, out of 318 engaged. Capt. J. A. Bivin and Lieut. M. S. McLeroy were killed in front of the line. Maj. H. V. McCain was wounded. Lieut.-Col. T. C. Standifer and Sergt.-Maj. H. Brunner were honorably mentioned. After the evacuation of Atlanta Hood designed a campaign to lure Sherman from Atlanta, cut his communications and force a battle further north. On September 25th President Davis arrived at headquarters, and on the next day, after a serenade by the Twentieth Louisiana band, he addressed the soldiers. Three days later the army began its movement northward. In the most serious engagement which followed, that at Allatoona, the Pointe Coupee artillery took part. Slocomb's battery, under Chalaron, did effective work at Dalton. Hood, closely pursued by Sherman, fell back into Alabama, and Sherman returned to Atlanta, burned the city, and set out for Savannah.
Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
na, Colonel Hunter, finding itself opposite an interval between the two regiments of Lowry's line, advanced with great spirit into the field, halted and delivered a very effective fire upon the enemy in front After some minutes Quarles withdrew his regiment and formed it behind the field, where they continued their fire across it. In the same battle the Thirtieth relieved the Thirty-ninth Georgia at the front. Next followed the fighting at Kenesaw mountain, During the operations near Kenesaw, the armies of Mississippi and of Tennessee suffered a heavy blow in the death of Lieut.-Gen Leonidas Polk. The united armies, though facing desperate perils, took time to mourn the bishop of Louisiana. He had ever been a pillar of strength to his people. Gentle in peace and undaunted in the field, he is remembered as the militant bishop of the Confederacy. the attempt to hold the Chattahoochee, the retreat across it, the relief of General Johnston by Gen. John B. Hood, and the fierce ba
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Georgia campaign Louisiana commands with Johnston and Polk their service from Dalton to Atlanta the siege battle of Jonesboro General Hood Withdraws to Alabama. ton assumed command of the army of Tennessee on December 18, 1863. He found at Dalton an army of about 36,000 effective infantry and artillery, with 5,000 cavalry. ck step by step, by a series of flanking movements, to Atlanta. In his army at Dalton, Johnston counted among his effective fighters the Louisiana brigade, in A. P. pe church. The gallant Austin, capable of commanding a regiment, had 60 men at Dalton, and had lost 23. Colonel Lewis mentioned in addition to names already given, Aorps was four miles distant, intent on cutting off the retreat of Johnston from Dalton. On the 13th, McPherson advancing, Scott was thrown forward to Bald Knob to me artillery took part. Slocomb's battery, under Chalaron, did effective work at Dalton. Hood, closely pursued by Sherman, fell back into Alabama, and Sherman retur
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
turn of April 30th.) The Louisiana cavalry was represented by Guy Dreux‘ company at headquarters, the artillery by Vaught's company with Hardee's corps and Capt. Charles E. Fenner's with Hood's. When Polk's army of Mississippi joined that of Tennessee at Resaca it brought a brigade under command of Col. Thomas M. Scott, of the Twelfth regiment (that regiment led by Lieut.-Col. Noel L. Nelson), in Loring's division; the Fourth Louisiana, Col. S. E. Hunter, and Thirtieth, Lieut.-Col. Thomas Shre they continued their fire across it. In the same battle the Thirtieth relieved the Thirty-ninth Georgia at the front. Next followed the fighting at Kenesaw mountain, During the operations near Kenesaw, the armies of Mississippi and of Tennessee suffered a heavy blow in the death of Lieut.-Gen Leonidas Polk. The united armies, though facing desperate perils, took time to mourn the bishop of Louisiana. He had ever been a pillar of strength to his people. Gentle in peace and undaunted
Kenesaw Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
formed as a second line. The Fourth Louisiana, Colonel Hunter, finding itself opposite an interval between the two regiments of Lowry's line, advanced with great spirit into the field, halted and delivered a very effective fire upon the enemy in front After some minutes Quarles withdrew his regiment and formed it behind the field, where they continued their fire across it. In the same battle the Thirtieth relieved the Thirty-ninth Georgia at the front. Next followed the fighting at Kenesaw mountain, During the operations near Kenesaw, the armies of Mississippi and of Tennessee suffered a heavy blow in the death of Lieut.-Gen Leonidas Polk. The united armies, though facing desperate perils, took time to mourn the bishop of Louisiana. He had ever been a pillar of strength to his people. Gentle in peace and undaunted in the field, he is remembered as the militant bishop of the Confederacy. the attempt to hold the Chattahoochee, the retreat across it, the relief of General Johns
L. M. Nutt (search for this): chapter 18
ined that of Tennessee at Resaca it brought a brigade under command of Col. Thomas M. Scott, of the Twelfth regiment (that regiment led by Lieut.-Col. Noel L. Nelson), in Loring's division; the Fourth Louisiana, Col. S. E. Hunter, and Thirtieth, Lieut.-Col. Thomas Shields, in Quarles' brigade, Walthall's division; the Pointe Coupee artillery, Capt. Alcide Bouanchaud, and Capt. Greenleaf's escort company. Later in the campaign the Fourth and Thirtieth were transferred to Gibson's brigade, and Nutt's company was added to Granbury's brigade. In the meager reports available of the Georgia campaign we catch glimpses of the heroic service of the Louisianians. General Gibson in his report of June 1st, describing previous operations, told of tenacious holding of his line, assisted by Fenner's battery, in Mill Creek gap, till ordered to the south. At Resaca the brigade made two charges, and on the retreat from there they were assigned to the rear guard. Hardly were they in line when atta
whose names I have mentioned were among the very best officers of the brigade. He especially commended Major Austin, who had been frequently distinguished on the skirmish line, and honorably mentioned his staff officers: Capt. H. H. Bein, adjutant-general; Capt. A. L. Stuart, inspectorgeneral; Maj. J. H. Henshaw, quartermaster; Maj. W. V. Crouch, commissary; Capt. G. Norton, successor to Bein; Lieut. H. P. Kernochan, an efficient aide in the frequent intrenching; Aide J. M. Gibson, and Lieut. L. Ware, volunteer aide, severely wounded at New Hope church. Fenner's artillery was complimented by General Stewart, with the battalion of three batteries in which it served, for effectiveness at New Hope church. Colonel Campbell reported at this time that he had 58 men bearing arms in the Thirteenth. Major Austin reported that, reinforced by two companies, he had suffered a loss of 26 killed out of a total of 85 effective in the stubborn fight he made against Hooker's advance at New Hope.
Duncan Buie (search for this): chapter 18
n, Johnston counted among his effective fighters the Louisiana brigade, in A. P. Stewart's division. The brigade was commanded by R. L. Gibson, promoted to brigadier-general; the First regiment regulars by Maj. S. S. Batchelor; the Thirteenth by Lieut.-Col. Francis L. Campbell; the Sixteenth and Twenty-fifth by Col. Joseph C. Lewis; the Nineteenth by Col. R. W. Turner, Lieut.-Col. Hyder A. Kennedy; the Twentieth by Maj. Samuel L. Bishop; the Fourth battalion by Lieut.-Col. J. McEnery, Maj. Duncan Buie; the Fourteenth battalion by Major Austin. (Return of April 30th.) The Louisiana cavalry was represented by Guy Dreux‘ company at headquarters, the artillery by Vaught's company with Hardee's corps and Capt. Charles E. Fenner's with Hood's. When Polk's army of Mississippi joined that of Tennessee at Resaca it brought a brigade under command of Col. Thomas M. Scott, of the Twelfth regiment (that regiment led by Lieut.-Col. Noel L. Nelson), in Loring's division; the Fourth Louisiana,
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