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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Beech Grove (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 2: Loss of the line of the Cumberland battle of Fishing creek death of General Zollicoffer fall of Fort Henry battle of Dover and capitulation of Fort Donelson— New Madrid and Island no.10 evacuation of Nashville. Gen. George B. Crittenden, commanding the Confederate forces in east Tennessee, under date of January 18, 1862, advised Gen. A. S. Johnston from his camp at Beech Grove, Ky., on the north side of the Cumberland river, that he was threatened by a superior force of the enemy in front, and finding it impossible to cross the river, I will have to make the fight on the ground I now occupy. He had under his command 4,000 effective men in two brigades: The First, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, was composed of the Fifteenth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. E. C. Walthall; Nineteenth Tennessee, Col. D. H. Cummings; Twentieth Tennessee, Col. Joel A. Battle; Twenty-fifth Tennessee, Col. S. S. Stanton; Rutledge's battery of four guns, Capt. A. M. Rutl
Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
rrender I was ordered by Major-General Pope to take charge of the prisoners, who were about 3,000 in number. On the 8th of April, when the affair was fresh in his memory, General Pope telegraphed the department commander that 2,000 prisoners, including General Mackall, had surrendered and were prisoners of war. Nashville had been defended at Fort Donelson. The surrender of one made it necessary to abandon the other. General Johnston determined to concentrate his own troops with those at Columbus, Ky., and at Pensacola, at Corinth, Miss., the junction of the Mobile & Ohio and the Memphis & Charleston railroads. General Grant was moving on the same point, and Gen. Don Carlos Buell, of the Federal army, who had been in front of Bowling Green with an army of 40,000 men, occupied Nashville as soon as it was abandoned by the Confederate forces, and began the movement of his troops that enabled him to form a junction with Grant in time to save the army of the latter from annihilation.
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
its defense, confronted by Pope's army and a powerful fleet of gunboats. Success, or the delay of the enemy, was impossible. Subsequently General Beauregard informed Mackall in writing, that when I sent you there, I considered matters in a desperate condition, and that you were going on a forlorn hope. Brig.-Gen. J. Trudeau was chief of artillery. The battery commanders, Capts. E. W. Rucker, Robert Sterling, Hoadley, Andrew Jackson, Jr., Jones, J. B. Caruthers, W. Y. C. Humes, Dismukes, Fisher, Johnston, were Tennesseeans. The artillerymen were in good discipline, and although the approaches to the island batteries were under water, and the batteries ultimately were submerged, the men were in good form and full of confidence. The only losses sustained by the Confederates in the attack of the 17th of March was Lieut. William M. Clark, of Rucker's battery, killed, and Sergt. I. T. Postlethwaite and six men slightly wounded. Four shots struck Foote's fleet without effect. The e
New Madrid, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, bring your troops to Nashville, if possible. Roger Hanson in his report said that up to the time (1 o'clock p. m. of the 15th) when we were ordered back to the trenches, our success was complete and our escape secure, but our success was misleading and defeated the wishes of General Johnston. Columbus, Ky., was still held by the Confederate troops, as well as New Madrid and Island No.10. Maj. John P. McCown was detached from Columbus, on the 26th of February, 1862, and ordered to New Madrid, Mo., and placed in command. General Beauregard dispatched General Polk on the same day that the place must be watched and held at all cost. Three days earlier Major-General Pope, of the Federal army, had assumed command of the army of the Mississippi, then concentrated at Commerce, Mo. This was made Pope's base of operations against New Madrid. In a week he was in motion, and on the 3d of March he was in front of New Madrid. At once he drove in the Confederate outposts and invested th
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
rtook to save the infantry and light battery by a retreat through Tiptonville, the only way open. His occupation of that place was anticipated by the Federal army, and on the morning of the 7th he wisely surrendered the forces under his command, consisting, as reported by him, of Stewart's field artillery company of 5 guns, and 2,900 infantry, of whom 400 were unarmed. There were 58 heavy guns abandoned, including 10 guns of the floating battery which were sunk in desperation in the Mississippi river. But General Pope reported to General Halleck that 273 field and company officers, 6,700 privates, 123 pieces of heavy artillery, 35 pieces of field artillery, all of the very best character and latest patterns, 7,000 stand of small-arms, tents for 12,000 men, several wharfboats, and hundreds of horses and mules, with immense stores of ammunition, were surrendered to him. Col. W. G. Cumming, Fifty-first Illinois, commanding brigade, in an official report, dated the 10th of April, said
Point Pleasant (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
d Upton's Tennessee battery, commanded by Col. E. W. Gantt, Twelfth Arkansas regiment. Another work at the mouth of Bayou St. John was garrisoned by the Fifth and Fortieth Tennessee, two Arkansas regiments under Col. L. M. Walker, the First Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee regiments, and Bankhead's Tennessee battery. On the 4th of March the enemy made a demonstration in force on McCown's lines and was driven back by Hollins' fleet and our land batteries. On the 6th, Pope occupied Point Pleasant, twelve miles below, with infantry and artillery, fortified the place, and established a blockade of the river against transports. General McCown reported, under date of March 31st, that on the same day the enemy with a white flag induced Capt. J. W. Dunnington (of Tennessee), commanding the gunboat Ponchartrain, to near the shore, when she was fired into by musketry, killing and wounding several. Skirmishing continued from day to day until the 13th, the enemy having made gradual appro
Commerce, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ohnston. Columbus, Ky., was still held by the Confederate troops, as well as New Madrid and Island No.10. Maj. John P. McCown was detached from Columbus, on the 26th of February, 1862, and ordered to New Madrid, Mo., and placed in command. General Beauregard dispatched General Polk on the same day that the place must be watched and held at all cost. Three days earlier Major-General Pope, of the Federal army, had assumed command of the army of the Mississippi, then concentrated at Commerce, Mo. This was made Pope's base of operations against New Madrid. In a week he was in motion, and on the 3d of March he was in front of New Madrid. At once he drove in the Confederate outposts and invested the place. General Pope reported his strength at 22,808 present for duty. His division commanders were Brig.-Gens. D. S. Stanley, Schuyler Hamilton, John M. Palmer, E. A. Paine, J. B. Plummer and Gordon Granger. Eleven batteries of artillery, and the Second and Third Michigan regiments o
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
The only losses sustained by the Confederates in the attack of the 17th of March was Lieut. William M. Clark, of Rucker's battery, killed, and Sergt. I. T. Postlethwaite and six men slightly wounded. Four shots struck Foote's fleet without effect. The exchange of shots continued at intervals until the 6th of April, when Captain Jackson, senior officer, under orders, spiked the guns and withdrew across Reelfoot lake with the entire artillery force. Flag-Officer Foote's experience at Forts Henry and Donelson caused him to keep without the range of Confederate guns. With his tactics the forts would never have been reduced. It was only when Pope's army crossed to the Tennessee shore, and capture was imminent, that Island No.10 was abandoned. General Mackall being cut off from the forts and heavy batteries, on the night of the same day undertook to save the infantry and light battery by a retreat through Tiptonville, the only way open. His occupation of that place was anticipat
Conestoga (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
its defense, and General Tilghman made the best defense possible. He maintained it long enough to enable Colonel Heiman to escape with the forces, and sacrificed himself and Captain Taylor's company of Tennesseeans. General Grant invested Fort Donelson on the 12th of February, 1862, with 15,000 troops, reinforced that evening by six regiments of infantry and Flag-Officer Foote's fleet of four ironclad and two wooden gunboats—the St. Louis, Carondelet, Louisville, Pittsburg, Tyler and Conestoga. Reinforcements continued to arrive. Wallace's division was brought over from Fort Henry, 10,000 men were sent by General Buell, and the Confederate lines were enveloped by 24,000 troops. General Buckner states, in his report, that at the close of the attack Grant's forces exceeded 50,000. Brig.-Gen. John B. Floyd, of Virginia, commanded the Confederate forces, amounting to 12,000 men. General Pillow commanded the left, General Buckner the right. The Tennesseeans present were, the Th
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
render I was ordered by Major-General Pope to take charge of the prisoners, who were about 3,000 in number. On the 8th of April, when the affair was fresh in his memory, General Pope telegraphed the department commander that 2,000 prisoners, including General Mackall, had surrendered and were prisoners of war. Nashville had been defended at Fort Donelson. The surrender of one made it necessary to abandon the other. General Johnston determined to concentrate his own troops with those at Columbus, Ky., and at Pensacola, at Corinth, Miss., the junction of the Mobile & Ohio and the Memphis & Charleston railroads. General Grant was moving on the same point, and Gen. Don Carlos Buell, of the Federal army, who had been in front of Bowling Green with an army of 40,000 men, occupied Nashville as soon as it was abandoned by the Confederate forces, and began the movement of his troops that enabled him to form a junction with Grant in time to save the army of the latter from annihilation.
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