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Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
service at an early age, without military experience or education, the Colonel fell in the gallant discharge of an almost desperate assault, in less than eighteen months, esteemed and honored for his acquirements and heroic deportment. To me his loss was severe, for I had looked to him for support, in a much higher and extended command. Please convey my thanks to the Colonel's brother for this mark of kind remembrance, and believe me, truly, Braxton Bragg. To Chas. L. Gaston, Esq'r, Jackson, Miss.) descended the last hill, in full view of the enemy's camp, it was discovered by the position of an Indiana regiment standing behind an improvised breastwork of knapsacks, a little re-retired from the crest of the hill beyond, with arms ready, that we were too far to the left, and ordered to march by the right flank down the ravine, until our right opposed their extreme left. And now comes the strange part of this sketch. Not a gun in our regiment was loaded. In the verdancy of our
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
s equally brave and good survived to receive their country's praise and honors. Among the latter was General Braxton Bragg, who was immediately promoted to the full proportions of General in the regular army. evacuation of Corinth, and General Bragg placed in command of the Army.—Shortly after the evacuation of Corinth by our forces, which was completed on the night of the 29th of May, General Beauregard's health having for a time failed him, he was granted a leave of absence by the Department at Richmond, and General Bragg placed in full command of the Army of the Mississippi, and soon thereafter inaugurated his celebrated Kentucky campaign. Leaving General Price behind, he moved with the remainder of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, by rail through the States of Alabama and Georgia, and massed it in and around Chattanooga and Knoxville, in advance of Buell, who, about the 10th day of June, left Corinth with the main body of his army, via Huntsville, Alabama, for Chattanoog
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
d, but now useless reflections, and for a time to recur to the scenes of the past, simply to note down my recollections as an eye-witness and observer of the movements and operations of the Army of Pensacola, and subsequently of Mississippi and Tennessee, while commanded by General Braxton Bragg, thinking the same will be appreciated by those who followed the varying fortunes of his standard, but were not behind the scenes, and hence could not know so much as I. If, as one of his little, butvy Yard, until February or early in March, when the disasters of Fort Donaldson on the Cumberland, and Henry on the Tennessee rivers, together with the evacuation by our forces, and the occupation by the enemy of Southern Kentucky, Middle and West Tennessee, and North Alabama, resulted in a concentration of all our available force under Albert Sidney Johnston, along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, with Corinth as its center and base. Having organized his splendid troops, Gene
E. T. Sykes (search for this): chapter 50
A Cursory sketch of General Bragg's campaigns. Paper no. 1. By Major E. T. Sykes, of Columbus, Miss. [The following sketches were writen by Major Sykes in January, 1873, and are now given just as they were originally prepared, with a few notes added. It is scarcely necessary to say that we publish without comment of our own, and without expressing any opinion as to certain controverted points.] Although remotely removed from the exciting events which transpired during the four years Major Sykes in January, 1873, and are now given just as they were originally prepared, with a few notes added. It is scarcely necessary to say that we publish without comment of our own, and without expressing any opinion as to certain controverted points.] Although remotely removed from the exciting events which transpired during the four years of War between the States, and reason has had time to coolly weigh with the accuracy of justice the motives and conduct of those superiors, who were at the helm of State, or generalship in the field, how few there are who have given thought sufficient to the real issues, its magnitude and surrounding, or sufficiently studied the military genius in more than one way displayed by our commanding Generals to meet the ever varying emergencies, to correctly estimate their respective merits. The caus
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 50
along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, with Corinth as its center and base. Having organized his splendid troops, General Johnston, with General Beauregard as second in command, put in motion on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, the Army of the Mississippi, to offer battle to the invaders of our soil. The d a bulwark between us and their destruction or surrender. Amidst the confusion of orders, some to advance, some to retreat, occasioned by the general order of Beauregard to retire for the night, we were in a fated hour repulsed, never again to enjoy the pleasure of having them so near in our grasp. Time, such as Wellington prayand General Bragg placed in command of the Army.—Shortly after the evacuation of Corinth by our forces, which was completed on the night of the 29th of May, General Beauregard's health having for a time failed him, he was granted a leave of absence by the Department at Richmond, and General Bragg placed in full command of the Army
d, being twenty-two guns massed in a semi-circle on an elongated eminence protecting his centre and left, and which proved a bulwark between us and their destruction or surrender. Amidst the confusion of orders, some to advance, some to retreat, occasioned by the general order of Beauregard to retire for the night, we were in a fated hour repulsed, never again to enjoy the pleasure of having them so near in our grasp. Time, such as Wellington prayed for on the plains of Waterloo, Oh! for Blucher, or for night, was given to them, and they profited thereby. Buell crossed the Tennessee, and the next morning, the 7th, was as disastrous to our arms as the day before had been propitious. About 11 o'clock A. M. on the 7th, Bragg's line, or at least that part of it in which was Chalmers's brigade, which had been fighting from the firing of the first gun on the 6th till then, fatigued and worn out, was ordered to lie down, whilst Breckinridge, with his brave Kentuckians, passed over the
J. R. Jackson (search for this): chapter 50
d been accomplished beat a hasty retreat. As they were rapidly putting for the Island and had gained a safe distance from the yard, they sent back a shower of grape from their howitzers, directed upon our men, then being rapidly formed, which fire being rendered uncertain by the darkness, only two were wounded. The next incident of a really exciting nature was an attack in three columns, respectively led by Colonels J. Patton Anderson, of Florida, Jas. R. Chalmers, of Mississippi and J. R. Jackson, of Georgia, all under command of Brigadier-General Richard Anderson, upon Wilson's Zouaves, encamped just outside Fort Pickens, in which a partial success was gained, and, but for an unfortunate accident, great advantage would have accrued. This was a little before day on the morning of the 8th of October,—a few were killed and wounded on both sides, and some prisoners captured by each belligerent. Among the prisoners taken from us was the entire medical corps, (Dr. W. L. Lipscomb, of
Wellington (search for this): chapter 50
again put in motion to attack the enemy's last stronghold, being twenty-two guns massed in a semi-circle on an elongated eminence protecting his centre and left, and which proved a bulwark between us and their destruction or surrender. Amidst the confusion of orders, some to advance, some to retreat, occasioned by the general order of Beauregard to retire for the night, we were in a fated hour repulsed, never again to enjoy the pleasure of having them so near in our grasp. Time, such as Wellington prayed for on the plains of Waterloo, Oh! for Blucher, or for night, was given to them, and they profited thereby. Buell crossed the Tennessee, and the next morning, the 7th, was as disastrous to our arms as the day before had been propitious. About 11 o'clock A. M. on the 7th, Bragg's line, or at least that part of it in which was Chalmers's brigade, which had been fighting from the firing of the first gun on the 6th till then, fatigued and worn out, was ordered to lie down, whilst B
Breckenridge (search for this): chapter 50
by sunrise came fairly upon them. Hardie commanded the front line, with Gladden's and Chalmers's brigades of Bragg's corps on his right, Bragg's corps, less the two brigades above-mentioned, constituting the second line, followed about four hundred yards distant. The corps of General Polk, following the second line at the distance of about eight hundred yards, in lines of brigades, deployed with their batteries in rear of each, protected by cavalry on their right. The reserves under General Breckenridge followed closely the third line in the same order, its right wing supported by cavalry. Well do I remember, being then Adjutant of the Tenth Mississippi infantry, of Chalmers's brigade, how all were spoiling for their maiden fight, in which, before they were through, they were willing to acknowledge that of choice, they would thereafter exhibit less of reckless anxiety, and more of prudent discretion. As the Tenth Mississippi (Colonel Robt. A. Smith commanding, and who was subsequen
he morning of the 3d of April, 1862, the Army of the Mississippi, to offer battle to the invaders of our soil. The attack was to have been made on the 6th, before Buell, who was marching to the assistance of Grant, at Pittsburg Landing, could possibly reach him, but owing to the bad roads, the Confederates were unable to reach theo near in our grasp. Time, such as Wellington prayed for on the plains of Waterloo, Oh! for Blucher, or for night, was given to them, and they profited thereby. Buell crossed the Tennessee, and the next morning, the 7th, was as disastrous to our arms as the day before had been propitious. About 11 o'clock A. M. on the 7th, Breneral Price behind, he moved with the remainder of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, by rail through the States of Alabama and Georgia, and massed it in and around Chattanooga and Knoxville, in advance of Buell, who, about the 10th day of June, left Corinth with the main body of his army, via Huntsville, Alabama, for Chattanooga.
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