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Fort Riley (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ime he was detailed to assist Lieutenant Parke, of the engineers, in surveying a route for a railroad in California. When this duty was completed, he was ordered to his regiment, the Second Dragoons, then stationed at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, and there was associated with a group of officers who afterwards became distinguished generals on both sides in the war between the States. Having been promoted to a first lieutenancy, and the regiment having been ordered, in the fall of 1855, to Fort Riley, Kansas, he commanded his company in the march across the plains to the latter fort from Fort Chadbourne. While stationed at Fort Riley, in the spring of 1856, the Kansas prelude to the great tragedy, in which he was destined to lose his life, began to stir the passions of the people of both sections of the country, and he had an opportunity of seeing and reflecting upon the inevitable tendency of events, as illustrated by the career of a notorious horse-thief and murderer, who was afterwards
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
, and then, their purpose being accomplished, retired unmolested to take their place in the ranks of death at Sharpsburg. The historic battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam—this great battle as General Lee called it in his report—occurred on the 17th day of September, three days after the fight at South Mountain, and D. H. Hill's division, with Anderson's brigade on its right, wearied and worn out by continuous marching and fighting, took position in the centre of the line on the left of the Boonsboro road. Longstreet was on the right, and Jackson, who had captured Harper's Ferry with its little army and all its supplies, occupied the extreme left. McClellan and Lee at last stood face to face. General McClellan said, before the Committee of Investigation on the Conduct of the War: Our forces at the battle of Antietam were: total in action, eight seven thousand one hundred and sixty-four. General Lee, in his report, says: This great battle was fought by less than forty thousand m
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
people and of admiration and respect with the stranger who visits them. And yet I ask where are the memorials which North Carolina has erected to her heroes and statesmen of either the remote or recent past? In all her wide domain, during the hundred years of her existence as a State, and with all her glorious record, there is to be found just one—the Caswell monument, at Kinston. There is not and never has been any other, and this one was not erected exclusively by the State. Go to the capitol at Washington and enter the old hall of representatives, now the hall of statuary. There is a place reserved in it for two statues from each State, and these places are being rapidly filled by the marble and bronze images of distinguished soldiers and statesmen. Look around for North Carolina's contribution. It is not there. Go to any other State capital, and if its public grounds do not contain some statue or monument in commemoration of its great men, its legislative halls at least a
Garysburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
is friendship. It was that indescribable illumination of the countenance by which the tenderness of a brave soul reveals itself and captivates the beholder—the benevolent, frank, gladsome smile which marks a lovable nature. And surely if any man ever possessed such a nature—a soft, gentle, refined, winning, and almost womanly spirit—it was he. Yet not Richard of England, nor Arnold Winkelried could look more unquailing in the face of death. Completing its organization and equipment at Garysburg, his regiment proceeded to Manassas, but not in time for the battle of the 21st of July. Colonel Anderson was soon afterwards made commandant of the post there and superintended the construction of the defensive works in the vicinity. The best possible evidence of the extraordinary esteem in which, even at this early period of his career, he was held by his superior officers, is to be found in an incident related to me by Major John W. Dunham, who was then his adjutant-general. Major Dun<
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
on under the command of Albert Sidney Johnston was sent to that Territory to vindicate the supremacy of the Federal authority and the rights of civilization and decency. The Second Dragoons was a part of the force detailed for this service, and Lieutenant Anderson served on the expedition as adjutant of the regiment. Remaining there until the fall of 1859, he was detached and sent to Kentucky, where, on the 8th of November of that year, he was united in marriage to Miss Mildred Ewing, of Louisville, and was soon thereafter stationed in that city as a recruiting officer. There he remained—in the enjoyment of what were, doubtless, the happiest days of his life—until the demon of civil war stamped his foot for the first time in our land in April, 1861, when, knowing full well what that meant and how dire would be the need of North Carolina for all her true sons, and especially those with military knowledge and experience, he immediately resigned his commission in the United States arm
Kinston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ivilized land such memorials are to be found in greater or less number and are at once a source of just pride with the people and of admiration and respect with the stranger who visits them. And yet I ask where are the memorials which North Carolina has erected to her heroes and statesmen of either the remote or recent past? In all her wide domain, during the hundred years of her existence as a State, and with all her glorious record, there is to be found just one—the Caswell monument, at Kinston. There is not and never has been any other, and this one was not erected exclusively by the State. Go to the capitol at Washington and enter the old hall of representatives, now the hall of statuary. There is a place reserved in it for two statues from each State, and these places are being rapidly filled by the marble and bronze images of distinguished soldiers and statesmen. Look around for North Carolina's contribution. It is not there. Go to any other State capital, and if its pu
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
ely fearless in the maintenance of what he believed to be true and right. These qualities, in combination with intellectual gifts of a superior order, gave him a precedence among his schoolmates, which he afterwards sustained at college and at West Point, so long as he cared to do so. While at the State University he divided the first honors of his class with three others, and received the unqualified commendation of all his professors, including the distinguished president. In the year 1848, when seventeen years old, he received—what he ardently aspired to—a cadetship at the Military Academy, and going to West Point he was very soon recognized as a youth of uncommon promise, and—as one of his classmates, who afterwards became a distinguished general in the United States army testified—was not only one of the brightest intellects, but the very superior mind of his class. At the first examination, six months after he entered, his number was two in a class of ninety-four members, but
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
edge of battle, and one which afterwards achieved as brilliant a reputation as the most brilliant in the Army of Northern Virginia. To say this is to exhaust the vocabulary of praise in behalf of any military organization that has yet appeared on earth. Then came the Seven Days struggle around Richmond, in each of which the brigade took an active part and the young Brigadier won new laurels as a most gallant and efficient officer. In the last of these engagements, the terrible work at Malvern Hill, General Anderson, while leading a desperate charge, received a wound in the hand In August the army commenced the first invasion of the enemy's territory after having fought several battles concluding with the second battle of Manassas, where Pope was ruined and a splendid victory won; but General Anderson's brigade was not engaged in any serious fight previous to the actual invasion of Maryland. At the battle of South Mountain, however, where General D. H. Hill's division was left by G
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 30
specially those with military knowledge and experience, he immediately resigned his commission in the United States army, and, promptly returning to his native State, tendered his sword in her defence, being the first of her sons then in that army to perform that act of filial devotion. That sword was already consecrated by the blood of a brilliant young officer, who had drawn his first breath on the banks of the Cape Fear and had yielded his last in a desperate charge at Pueblo de Taos in Mexico—his brave and accomplished uncle, Captain John Henry King Burgwyn, who, on that fatal field, ended a career which, by the common consent of his superiors, would, if not untimely closed, have placed him at the head of his profession. Like his gallant and gifted nephew, that heroic son of North Carolina found his last resting place in the soil he loved so well, for although the victim of A petty fortress and a dubious hand in a foreign land, more than one thousand miles froth the western
John W. Dunham (search for this): chapter 30
ruction of the defensive works in the vicinity. The best possible evidence of the extraordinary esteem in which, even at this early period of his career, he was held by his superior officers, is to be found in an incident related to me by Major John W. Dunham, who was then his adjutant-general. Major Dunham vouches for the truth of the statement and that the incident happened within his own personal knowledge at that time. It was this: that although only a colonel, Anderson was sent for by GeMajor Dunham vouches for the truth of the statement and that the incident happened within his own personal knowledge at that time. It was this: that although only a colonel, Anderson was sent for by General Joseph E. Johnston, the general in command of that army, and was requested by him to give his opinion as to the movements of the army in view of the operations of the enemy. General Johnston then and frequently afterwards expressed great confidence in his judgment and skill. Colonel Anderson remained in command at Manassas until the place was evacuated in March, 1862, and while there, was, on several occasions earnestly recommended for promotion by his commanding officers, Generals D. H.
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