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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
r and forcible exposition of the doctrine of State rights: That the powers of government may be reassumed by the people when-so-ever it may become necessary to their happiness; that every power, jurisdiction, and right which is not by the Constitution clearly delegated to the Congress of the United States * * * remain to the people of the several States, or to their respective State governments to which they may have granted the same. For nearly two years after the first ratification, by Delaware in December, 1787, North Carolina held aloof from the Union, and for more than a year after the government went into operation, the great State of Rhode Island remained a free and independent nation. No attempt was ever made, or even suggested, to force them into the new Union, or to infringe even the least of their rights as free and independent States. The secession of the other eleven States from the old confederation, which was expressly declared to be a perpetual union, furnishes the
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
it might seem that until the great civil war the career of the United States was peculiarly free from the difficulties and dangers that usuaevery hand. The Constitution was appealed to, to show that the United States had no right to the acquisition of foreign territory either by ments during the administration of Washington, and at that time United States senator from Massachusetts, in a letter referring to what he cost the true issue. It is safe to say, and the history of the United States during the first seventy years of their existence is conclusive Texas, and ere the recently elected sectional President of the United States dons the robes of office a new nation has been born, whose lifeworks, chemical works, a powder-mill far superior to any in the United States, and a chain of arsenals, armories, and laboratories equal in their capacity to the best of those in the United States, and stretching link by link from Virginia to Alabama. The numbers on each side.
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
at that time United States senator from Massachusetts, in a letter referring to what he considered the abuse of the Federal power in the Louisiana purchase, says: The principles of our Revolution point to the remedy—a separation. * * * It must begin in Massachusetts. The proposition would be welcomed in Connecticut, and could we doubt of New Hampshire? But New York must be associated, and how is her concurrence to be obtained? She must be made the centre of the confederacy. Vermont and New Jersey would follow of course, and Rhode Island of necessity. With the single substitution of the names of the States, how would this sound in 1861 when the rights of the slave-holding States were invaded? The principles of our Revolution point to the remedy—a separation. * * * It must begin in South Carolina. The proposition would be welcomed in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, and could we doubt of Louisiana and Texas? But Virginia must be associated. * * * Arkansas, Tennessee and North
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
Jackson's immortal Valley Campaign; the Seven Days wrestle of giants, by which Richmond was relieved of the presence of a great investing army, to which her spires had for weeks been visible; the second and greater victory at Manassas, which rolled the tide of invasion back across the border; the Confederate invasion of Maryland; the capture of Harper's Ferry; the great battle of Sharpsburg, where thirty-five thousand Confederates divided the honors with eighty-seven thousand Federals; Fredericksburg, from whose encircling hills the gallant and mighty Army of the Potomac reeled bleeding back across the Rappahannock. These mark the salient points of the campaign in Virginia, and challenge the annals of war for a parallel. But in another and distant field, the great Confederate paladin of the West had fallen in sight of victory at Shiloh. The death of Albert Sidney Johnston was an irreparable loss to his army and to the Confederacy. Earth never bore a nobler son or heaven opened w
Lexington, Lafayette County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
Northern Virginia needs no other answer than a reading of the roll of battles fought on Virginia soil, from Bull Run to Appomattox. * * * Lee led his ill-supplied army from victory to victory, year after year, beating back with terrible losses the wonderfully organized, perfectly equipped, lavishly supplied, abundantly officered Army of the Potomac. The First year of war closed gloriously for the Confederacy, Bull Run and Ball's Bluff, in Virginia, and Belmont, Springfield and Lexington, in Missouri, had scored as many victories for its arms. These, however, were but the preluding skirmishes to the mighty shock of battle which was yet to come. I shall not tax your patience to-night with details of battle and of siege, of advance and retreat, of alternate victory and defeat. Or note each movement of that mighty tide of war, which carried on its flow high hopes, free aspirations, proud emotions, anticipated success, peace, and left behind at its ebb shattered human wrecks, en
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
tes them by a chain of mighty States to the cliffs of the rude Atlantic. Massachusetts the mother of secession. Sentiment or considerations of abstract right hy for what she styled the abuse of the powers of the general government. Massachusetts, the mother of secession, which she had taught to her sister colonies in 17e administration of Washington, and at that time United States senator from Massachusetts, in a letter referring to what he considered the abuse of the Federal power of our Revolution point to the remedy—a separation. * * * It must begin in Massachusetts. The proposition would be welcomed in Connecticut, and could we doubt of Nnocked at the door of the Union for admission as a State, Josiah Quincy, of Massachusetts, said upon the floor of Congress, If this bill passes, it is my deliberate t ended only when Lee laid down his arms at Appomattox. I have said that Massachusetts was the mother of secession—nor need she or any other State be ashamed to o
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 1.9
pillar in the temple of our constitutional Union, though despoiled by ruthless hands of its ancient dignity and strength, still lives to sustain and vitalize the grandest system of government which human wisdom has ever evolved, and must in some form always remain the grand conservator of American free institutions. Secession in 1776. From the first settlement of the English colonies in America, throughout their whole colonial existence up to the time when they were acknowledged by Great Britain to be free and independent States, community independence was guarded with the most jealous care, as the palladium of their rights and liberties. In defense of this great principle their secession from the mother country was justified, and not only was the principle established by their success, but the remedy stamped with the seal of right. The Union formed. Eleven years later, when the men of ‘76 stood around the cradle of the present Union in the convention of 1787, the same
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
d him a hundred times in battle—unflinchingly. The Confederacy had been cut in two when the Mississippi was opened by the fall of Vicksburg. Another line had now been drawn across it, marked with blood and grave-mounds, from the Tennessee to Atlanta, and by blackened ruins and desolated homes from Atlanta to the sea. Hood's ill-starred expedition into Tennessee had ended in disaster. The fair valley of the Shenandoah had been ravaged until, in the graphic but unclassic language of the FedeAtlanta to the sea. Hood's ill-starred expedition into Tennessee had ended in disaster. The fair valley of the Shenandoah had been ravaged until, in the graphic but unclassic language of the Federal commander there, a crow in flying across it would have to carry his rations with him. Sherman was advancing through the heart of the Carolinas, marking his track by the blaze of burning cities and homes. And so disasters came not singly; But as if they watched and waited, Scanning one another's motions, When the first descended, others Followed, followed gathering flock-wise Round their wounded, dying victim, First a shadow, then a sorrow, Till the air was dark with anguish. The wo
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.9
ons, let us hope forever, and both gave to the world men worthy to be ranked with the Homeric heroes of old. The negro appears upon the scene. When in 1820 Missouri applied for admission to the Union as a slave State, sectional interests and animosity again obtruded themselves into the counsels of the Union. The compatriotsituted champions, whose interests prompt them to value orthodoxy more than truth. A geographical line was fixed beyond which slavery could not go, and so by the Missouri Compromise the dominant section of the Union appropriated to itself the lion's share of the very territory against the acquisition of which it had threatened seccy. Earth never bore a nobler son or heaven opened wide its gates to receive a knightlier spirit. The border States. Operations in Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri had decided finally the status of the border States towards the Confederacy. The shackles of Federal power had been firmly riveted upon them, and henceforth the
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1.9
of the law—in one notable instance in this very city of Richmond—leaving to the sober, second thought of the country the vindication of her position and the reversal of an unconstitutional act. The Louisiana purchase. From this time onward came thick and fast, occasions for the opposition of the States to the acts of the general government, the assertion of what they conceived to be their rights and their construction of the Constitution. When the Louisiana territory was acquired from France in 1803, not only was the purchase denounced by the New England States, but threats of a withdrawal from the Union were heard on every hand. The Constitution was appealed to, to show that the United States had no right to the acquisition of foreign territory either by purchase, by treaty, or by conquest. Surely a most lame and impotent conclusion, to bind the strong limbs of the young giant of the West by the narrow territorial limits of the old colonial days. A conclusion which would hav
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