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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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John M. Brooke (search for this): chapter 1.52
rs that I commanded the electrical submarine defences not a friendly skin was broken to my knowledge, and it must be remembered that I had to experiment and bring the system to perfection. I never met or communicated with General Rains or any one attached to his submarine defences during the war or since. If your memory still fails you, there are four well-known officers living who can testify to the exactness of all I have here written, viz: Captains W. H. Parker, J. Pembroke Jones, John M. Brooke, and J. Taylor Wood. I have therefore to request that as an act of simple justice you will answer this letter and correct the mistakes referred to. Very truly and respectfully yours, Hunter Davidson. Beauvoir, Harrison county, Miss., January 25, 1882. Captain Hunter Davidson: Sir—Yours of the 5th December (in duplicate) has been received and opens with a call on me to do you justice. If you were surprised at not finding in my book your name mentioned in connection with torp
J. Taylor Wood (search for this): chapter 1.52
the electrical submarine defences not a friendly skin was broken to my knowledge, and it must be remembered that I had to experiment and bring the system to perfection. I never met or communicated with General Rains or any one attached to his submarine defences during the war or since. If your memory still fails you, there are four well-known officers living who can testify to the exactness of all I have here written, viz: Captains W. H. Parker, J. Pembroke Jones, John M. Brooke, and J. Taylor Wood. I have therefore to request that as an act of simple justice you will answer this letter and correct the mistakes referred to. Very truly and respectfully yours, Hunter Davidson. Beauvoir, Harrison county, Miss., January 25, 1882. Captain Hunter Davidson: Sir—Yours of the 5th December (in duplicate) has been received and opens with a call on me to do you justice. If you were surprised at not finding in my book your name mentioned in connection with torpedoes, I was certain
ion of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending the James river to co-operate with General Butler in the attack on Drewry's Bluff by causing the retirement of that fleet, undoubtedly saved Drewry's Bluff, the key of Richmond. Again he says: I always regarded the sub-marine department under your command as equal in importance to any division of the army. About the same time I received the most flattering letters from General Robert E. Lee, Admiral Buchanan and others on the subject of my services in command of the submarine defences; and it is with painful surprise I find you have forgotten a long letter of the same nature written me by yourself, as you do not even allude to any act of mine in your work. In March, 1864, I ran down the James river from Richmond to its mouth in a small steam launch, and attacked the flagship Minnesota with a spar torpedo, doing her considerable injury, and returned to Richmond without the slightest loss
teries; the manufacture of the plantinum or quantity fuse, which alone was used in the electrical defences around Richmond, and in those at Charleston. The department was completely organized before the 1st of January, 1863, both in personnel and material, and occupied nine well-constructed stations on the James River alone, connected by telegraph, and with the office of the Secretary of the Navy. The effective work of this organization consisted in the partial destruction of the Commodore Barney, a gunboat, and the loss of many lives in August, 1863, and the complete destruction of the Commodore Jones, a large gunboat, and nearly all her crew in May, 1864. These were the first vessels ever injured in war by any system of electrical defences. In a long letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, to me after the war, he says: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending the James river to co-operate with Gene
letter from Captain Hunter Davidson, formerly of the Confederate naval service, dated Villa Rica, Paraguay, December 14, 1896, places at the disposal of the Sun, a fragment of personal experience during the Civil War, which is also, in its way, a contribution of value to the literature relating to that period. It was originally published in the Buenos Ayres Herald, but will of course find an incomparably greater circle of readers in this country. Captain Davidson entered the navy with Admiral Luce in 1841, and they were together at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, twenty years later, while their friendship was renewed after the Civil War. As to the correspondence with Jefferson Davis, it speaks for itself, although it should be added that Captain Davidson considers that Mr. Davis was somewhat prejudiced against the navy, and that he attributes the particular omission of mention which he discusses, to Mr. Davis' having been informed of his criticism of the latter's prejudices, Mr. Dav
ement of my electrical submarine defences. By authority of the Minister I had the torpedo dragged for and removed. The second instance was toward the close of the war, when some of these self-acting torpedoes of General Rains were again placed in the James river, and the Confederate steamer Shultz went down the river loaded with Federal prisoners to be exchanged at City Point. Fortunately for the South there was not another pretext for the cry of murder and assassination against it. The Shultz passed the Rains torpedo going down and delivered the prisoners safely, but when returning she struck it and was destroyed. During the years that I commanded the electrical submarine defences not a friendly skin was broken to my knowledge, and it must be remembered that I had to experiment and bring the system to perfection. I never met or communicated with General Rains or any one attached to his submarine defences during the war or since. If your memory still fails you, there are fo
crew in May, 1864. These were the first vessels ever injured in war by any system of electrical defences. In a long letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, to me after the war, he says: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending the James river to co-opercontemplated attack on Drewry's Bluff to which I referred in my first letter to you, and concerning which I quoted from the letter of the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, occurred in 1864, as clearly shown in my letter and in Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending James river to co-operate with General Butler in the attack on Drewry's Bluff, by causing the retirement of that fleet, undoubtedly saved Drewry's Bluff, the key to Richmond. How widely different in date and nature are the two circumstances, and yet you, of all persons, confuse them, and
Hunter Davidson (search for this): chapter 1.52
Davis and Davidson. [from the N. Y. sun, Feb. 28, 1897.] a chapter of war history concerning torpedoes. The correspondence that passed between Jefferson Davis and Captain Davidson in relation to the services of the latter officer. A letter from Captain Hunter Davidson, formerly of the Confederate naval service, dated Villa Rica, Paraguay, December 14, 1896, placesparably greater circle of readers in this country. Captain Davidson entered the navy with Admiral Luce in 1841, and they t speaks for itself, although it should be added that Captain Davidson considers that Mr. Davis was somewhat prejudiced agaies referred to. Very truly and respectfully yours, Hunter Davidson. Beauvoir, Harrison county, Miss., January 25, 1882. Captain Hunter Davidson: Sir—Yours of the 5th December (in duplicate) has been received and opens with a call on me to ill use whatever means I am possessed of to give them all possible publicity. Yours very respectfully, Hunter Davidson
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 1.52
Davis and Davidson. [from the N. Y. sun, Feb. 28, 1897.] a chapter of war history concerning torpedoes. The correspondence that passed between Jefferson Davis and Captain Davidson in relation to the services of the later the Civil War. As to the correspondence with Jefferson Davis, it speaks for itself, although it should be added that Captain Davidson considers that Mr. Davis was somewhat prejudiced against the navy, and that he attribticular omission of mention which he discusses, to Mr. Davis' having been informed of his criticism of the latter's prejudices, Mr. Davis' history thus ignoring events discussed in many works on torpedoes. Buenos Ayres, December 5, 1881. Hon. Jefferson Davis, Sir,—I write to ask that you will do an act of justice. On pagis is a reply, I am respectfully, (Signed.) Jefferson Davis. Buenos Ayres, April 4, 1882. Hon. JeffersoHon. Jefferson Davis: Sir—Your letter of the 25th of January is at hand. It was not my intention to continue this corre
G. J. Rains (search for this): chapter 1.52
ate account of all the important transactions of the war. Your letter indicates that you feel aggrieved because of General G. J. Rains being alone mentioned in connection with torpedoes. You infer that it will hereafter be supposed he was awarded tbring the use of this terrible instrument to a perfection. At a date long before this perfection had been attained General Rains is named incidentally with the order putting him in charge of submarine defences and the first rudely constructed tor artillerists and riflemen who disabled and drove off the fleet. It seems to me that the remark the secret of all his (Rains') future success consisted in the sensitive primer, is by no means a denial that success was obtained by other persons emccess of that system of torpedo defences, now adopted in its more developed form by the whole world, when your friend General Rains' beer barrel, demijohns and sensitive fuses have long passed into oblivion, you persist in being wholly oblivious.
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