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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Evacuation Echoes. Assistant-Secretary of war Campbell's interview with Mr. Lincoln. The following letter, though it has been published several times before,ntlemen—I have had, since the evacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens otates, and under the Constitution of the United States. I understood from Mr. Lincoln, if this condition be fulfilled, that no attempt would be made to establish or sustain any other authority. My conversation with President Lincoln upon the terms of settlement was answered in writing—that is, he left with me a written mems may return after they had concluded their business, without interruption. Mr. Lincoln, in his memorandum, referred to what would be his action under the confiscattant Secretary of War. (Under pressure from Admiral Porter and others, Mr. Lincoln was compelled almost immediately to revoke his order permitting the Legislat
April 7th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 1.61
Evacuation Echoes. Assistant-Secretary of war Campbell's interview with Mr. Lincoln. The following letter, though it has been published several times before, will be found interesting: Richmond, Va., April 7, 1865. General Joseph R. Anderson and Others, Committee, etc.: Gentlemen—I have had, since the evacuation of Richmond, two conversations with Mr. Lincoln, President of the United States. My object was to secure for the citizens of Richmond, and the inhabitants of the State of Virginia, who had come under the military authority of the United States, as much gentleness and forbearance as could be possibly extended. The conversation had relation to the establishment of a government for Virginia, the requirement of oaths of allegiance from the citizens, and the terms of settlement with the United States, with the concurrence and sanction of General Weitzell. He assented to the application not to require oaths of allegiance from the citizens. He stated that he woul
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