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Lucknow (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
of Atlanta, the fall of Savannah, the burning of Columbia, Averysboro, Bentonville and the surrenders at Goldsboro and Appomattox! The Confederate armies! how memory goes back to their wonderful achievements! Their high soldierly qualities! Their whole career, marked by a virile spirit; a decisive energy; a brave persistence; a patient endurance, which reflect the high military qualities of the men of the same race, kin beyond sea, who won victory for Wolfe at Quebec! Made Ingliss hold Lucknow against fearful odds! and who planted the Cross of St. George on the walls of Delhi, in the midst of the mutiny! If a like success did not attend finally the grand achievements of the soldiers of the South the causes may be traced, partly to disparity of numbers and resources, and partly to other serious disabilities of a different kind, which the loyalty of the armies to the flag and the forbearance of the people in their homes for the sake of The Cause have forbid all reference to or m
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
s, but the musketry at Honey Hill! ( Georgians, under Willis, Edwards, Wilson, Cook and Jackson, and 3d South Carolina cavalry, as infantry, under Major John Jenkins responsible), was something fearful. The rebel yell was more prominent (artillery, cavalry and infantry, all responsible) than ever I heard it! Good management of the enemy. It is only fair to say that the Confederate management seems to have been excellent from first to last. The energy which brought a force from Western Georgia to the coast of Carolina so opportunely that it got in position only ten minutes before the main action opened, the audacity and adroitness which checked the advance of a whole brigade for several hours with one (2) gun and a few dismounted cavalry, and the soldierly ability with which artillery and infantry were so handled, as to inflict a loss of 750 men, while losing only 50, all deserve the highest praise; on their side good generalship, on ours the reverse. On the day of Honey H
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
Heroes of Honey Hill. [from the Charleston, S. C., Sunday news, Nov. 20, 1898.] Magnificent work of the field Artillery. Brief sketches of Stuart's, Kanapaux's and Earle's Batteries—An enemy's praise of the conduct of the Confederates and their management of the Fight—Splendid discipline of the infantry, cavalry and Artillery forces engaged. [Reference may be made to preceding articles by Hon. William A. Courtenay, ante pp. 52 and 62. This was received from the accomplished writer since they were printed although it preceded them in the date of original publication. Whilst the articles are mutually illustrative they are not affected in their value by being printed as they are in this volume. Major Courtenay writes as to the artillery heroes of the Battle of Honey Hill: It was just wonderful what the boys did—Why, a rabbit could not have crossed the road. —Ed.] It is remarkable enough to be particularly mentioned that field pieces from three separate commands sh
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1.13
uickly followed the burning of Atlanta, the fall of Savannah, the burning of Columbia, Averysboro, Bentonville and the surrenders at Goldsboro and Appomattox! The Confederate armies! how memory goes back to their wonderful achievements! Their high soldierly qualities! Their whole career, marked by a virile spirit; a decisive energy; a brave persistence; a patient endurance, which reflect the high military qualities of the men of the same race, kin beyond sea, who won victory for Wolfe at Quebec! Made Ingliss hold Lucknow against fearful odds! and who planted the Cross of St. George on the walls of Delhi, in the midst of the mutiny! If a like success did not attend finally the grand achievements of the soldiers of the South the causes may be traced, partly to disparity of numbers and resources, and partly to other serious disabilities of a different kind, which the loyalty of the armies to the flag and the forbearance of the people in their homes for the sake of The Cause have f
Bentonville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
d the advance of a whole brigade for several hours with one (2) gun and a few dismounted cavalry, and the soldierly ability with which artillery and infantry were so handled, as to inflict a loss of 750 men, while losing only 50, all deserve the highest praise; on their side good generalship, on ours the reverse. On the day of Honey Hill the disastrous Battle of Franklin was fought; then quickly followed the burning of Atlanta, the fall of Savannah, the burning of Columbia, Averysboro, Bentonville and the surrenders at Goldsboro and Appomattox! The Confederate armies! how memory goes back to their wonderful achievements! Their high soldierly qualities! Their whole career, marked by a virile spirit; a decisive energy; a brave persistence; a patient endurance, which reflect the high military qualities of the men of the same race, kin beyond sea, who won victory for Wolfe at Quebec! Made Ingliss hold Lucknow against fearful odds! and who planted the Cross of St. George on the wa
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
is now known, was struck thirty times and set on fire once; other ships bore the evidence of resistance to the invasion of our State. It was a grand fight between war vessels and land batteries, and yet I have never read any proper Confederate narrative of it. The late Hon. William Henry Trescot, in his eloquent eulogy on General Stephen Elliott, thus alludes to it: Early in November, 1861, the greatest naval armament the United States had ever put to sea was collected in the waters of Port Royal. It is strange now to think that with a year's warning, with full knowledge of the danger, the only resistance to this tremendous power was left to two earthworks, two miles apart, hastily erected by such civil skill as could be found, and with the aid of native labor from the adjoining plantations, and garrisoned by a few hundred citizens—militia, who had never known a harder service than the weariness of a Governor's review. And still stranger that the neighboring population went on qu
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
ation about the coast defence, and of this decisive battle, and believing that the particulars of each of these artillery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the annoneers, at the head of the Grahamville road, certainly made a splendid record on November 30, 1864, at Honey Hill. As soon as the carpet-bag government of South Carolina ended, and Governor Hampton took charge of the Executive office, the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery reorganized, under Captain Stuart, and still continues in Sty of military age, is now among the Survivors with streaks of silver in his hair; he will, I hope, excuse me for publicly recording how he did his duty to South Carolina and the South, under very serious disabilities, in perilous times. As soon as it was possible after the election of Governor Hampton, the Lafayettes resume
Greenville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
giment. It soon attracted a large membership, and the lieutenants were: G. W. Holtzclaw, first; W. E. Earle, second; James Furman, third. There being need for artillerists, Colonel Gregg consented to release the command; in numbers it was large enough for two companies. Captain W. H. Campbell was promoted major, and Lieutenants Holtzclaw and Earle were made captains. Captain Earle's company as a compliment was named for Dr. James C. Furman, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Greenville city. Its three officers were Lieutenants James Furman, a son of Dr. Furman; E. H. Graham, Jr., S. S. Kirby (Citadel, 1860), and Anderson. (In United States War Records and other war publications Earle's Battery is not reported at Honey Hill—a strange neglect and unexplained.) The battery at Honey Hill had Lieutenant Kirby sick in the hospital, and Lieutenant Anderson absent on leave. Sergeant J. P. Scruggs, acting lieutenant, was in charge of a gun on the extreme left of the line, co
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
battle, and believing that the particulars of each of these artillery commands would be interesting to the South Carolina public, I write this communication. Beaufort Volunteer Artillery (Stuart's Battery). Our historian, the late William Gilmore Sims, is authority for the statement that this command was founded in 1776, anng officer speak once of the clean condition of the carbines, that he thought a white cambric handkerchief could be passed through the barrel without soiling. Beaufort (Elliott's) Light Battery, four guns. Lampkin's (Va.) Light Battery, four pieces. Major Morgan, with two companies of cavalry. Captain Izard's company, of theant J. P. Scruggs, acting lieutenant, was in charge of a gun on the extreme left of the line, commanded by Major John Jenkins. The other guns, with those of the Beaufort and Lafayettes, were in battery at the head of the Grahamville road. Earle's Battery was in a number of engagements on the coast line during the war; did tours
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.13
urs with one (2) gun and a few dismounted cavalry, and the soldierly ability with which artillery and infantry were so handled, as to inflict a loss of 750 men, while losing only 50, all deserve the highest praise; on their side good generalship, on ours the reverse. On the day of Honey Hill the disastrous Battle of Franklin was fought; then quickly followed the burning of Atlanta, the fall of Savannah, the burning of Columbia, Averysboro, Bentonville and the surrenders at Goldsboro and Appomattox! The Confederate armies! how memory goes back to their wonderful achievements! Their high soldierly qualities! Their whole career, marked by a virile spirit; a decisive energy; a brave persistence; a patient endurance, which reflect the high military qualities of the men of the same race, kin beyond sea, who won victory for Wolfe at Quebec! Made Ingliss hold Lucknow against fearful odds! and who planted the Cross of St. George on the walls of Delhi, in the midst of the mutiny! If a
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