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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
Young, and Revised by Captain Thomas Ellett, thirty-eight years after close of the war. On Friday, March 14, 1862, there assembled at the wholesale warehouse of Messrs. Crenshaw & Co., on the Basin bank, between Tenth and Eleventh streets, Richmond, Va., one of the jolliest, most rollicking, fun-loving crowd of youngsters, between the ages of 16 and 25, that were ever thrown together haphazard, composed of clerks, book-keepers, salesmen, compositors, with a small sprinkling of solid businesshe rear, and go you shall. And go it did. On July 3d, after being nicely refitted, the battery started to rejoin General A. P. Hill's Light Division, which, with the rest of the army, was driving McClellan towards the Federal gunboats on James river. The battery was then assigned to Maj. R. Lindsay Walker's Battalion of Light Artillery, and the scene of operations having shifted to Northern Virginia, we were soon on the road to Culpeper, and on the 9th of August, 1862, when Jackson cam
Otey (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
although the men behind them fought until the infantry were about to bayonet them. The lines then broke everywhere, but we got off with the three remaining guns of the Crenshaw Battery. Then commenced the last act in the tragedy of four years—the retreat to Appomattox. Sleepless nights and days of hunger and fighting from the 3d to the evening of the 8th, when we unlimbered our guns for the last time, and repulsed the enemy's attack, supported only by a few artillerymen with muskets—the Otey Battery—when night came on. The next day we cut down our guns, and sorrowfully wended our way homeward. The curtain fell. That was the end. Incidental. Captain Crenshaw was ever mindful of the welfare of his old command, and one of his first acts after going to Europe for the government was to send a full uniform and a pair of boots to each member of the company. This gift was captured by a Federal cruiser in transit, but as soon as he heard of it, he duplicated it, and the second gi<
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
ed 2d Lieut., November 5, 1863; captured at Five Forks, April I, 1865. Allen, William B., Corporal, March 14, 1862; commissioned 2d Lieut., November 17, 1863; wounded at Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862; resigned March 9, 1865. Allegre, William R., Sergeant and Corporal, March 14, 1862; served until surrender, April 9, 1865; wounded at Rixeyville, November 9, 1863, and Jericho Ford, May 23, 1864. Adkisson, J. C., Corporal, March 14, 1862; served until surrender, April 9, 1865; died in Norfolk, Va., about 1880 or 81. Arvin, George A., private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Almarode, S., private, November 14, 1863; served until surrender. Allen, R. E., private, March 14, 1862; discharged June 25, 1862. Arrvil, H. D., private, November 16, 1863. Burgess, William R., bugler, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Burroughs, T. H., private, March 14, 1862; badly wounded at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863. Burgess, B. F., private, March 14, 1862; wounded at
Rixeyville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
battery was engaged in affairs of more or less importance at Gaines' Cross Roads, on July 24, 1863, Shepherdstown on September 19th, Bristoe Station in October, Rixeyville on November 9th, Mine Run in December, and then had a resting spell until the spring of 1864, when Grant had been made commander-in-chief of all the Federal arms' Mill, June 27, 1862; resigned March 9, 1865. Allegre, William R., Sergeant and Corporal, March 14, 1862; served until surrender, April 9, 1865; wounded at Rixeyville, November 9, 1863, and Jericho Ford, May 23, 1864. Adkisson, J. C., Corporal, March 14, 1862; served until surrender, April 9, 1865; died in Norfolk, Va., ab 1864. McLeod, Alex. O., private, December 1, 1864. Murray, Dan'l F., private, March 14, 1862. Moyers, A. J., private, March 14, 1862; lost his leg at Rixeyville, November 9, 1863. Mann, M. B., private, March 14, 1862; discharged by civil authority September 4, 1863. Moss, J. F., private, May 22, 1862; died August
Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
to send a full uniform and a pair of boots to each member of the company. This gift was captured by a Federal cruiser in transit, but as soon as he heard of it, he duplicated it, and the second gift got through the blockade, and added much to the comfort of his men. Captain Crenshaw died at Hawfield, near Orange Courthouse, his country residence, on the 24th of May, 1897, mourned and beloved by all his neighbors. His remains were brought to Richmond and buried in the family section in Hollywood. The bullet-ridden battleflag of the Crenshaw Battery, draped in mourning, was placed at the head of the grave as the members of his old company filed in, and their sorrowful countenances betokened the high esteem in which their old commander was held. Captain Crenshaw commanded the battery from its organization until October 1, 1862; Lieutenant James Ellett commanded until December 13, 1862, when he was killed; Lieut. A. B. Johnston commanded until November, 1863; Captain Thomas Ellet
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
e, General Comd'g. After the battle of Sharpsburg our camp was several times changed in the Valley of Virginia, and finally landed down below Berryville, where we rested up, and, with the exception of a small affair at Snicker's Gap, had a quiet time. Saturday, November 22, received orders to take up the line of march for Fredericksburg, where we arrived December 2, and at once began preparations for the conflict of the 13th—as Burnside's army was already strung along the Rappahannock river and beyond. The hills near Hamilton's Crossing were soon crowned with artillery, and the guns of the Crenshaw Battery were not the least conspicuous. When the enemy advanced and opened fire the battery was soon enveloped in a storm of shot and shell, as well as subjected to a galling fire of infantry, but right well did the men acquit themselves, although they had to mourn the death of many brave men and one gallant officer, Lieutenant James Ellett, who fell early in the action. N
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
Maxey Gregg, where the bugles almost daily sounded an alarm, with the harnessing and and hitching of horses and a gallop down the Telegraph or Catharpin road, with cannoneers mounted; but no enemy to be found, was the usual result. The men became so accustomed to these alarms that they began to enjoy them, and they in no small degree preferred them to the long, tedious, and bloody campaign they were soon to enter upon. In the mean time McClellan had landed his hosts on the Peninsula, Williamsburg had been fought, and his army was soon thundering at the gates of Richmond. Lee had concentrated his army in front of him, and the Crenshaw Battery was ordered to take position on the left of the line, and was soon to receive its baptism of fire in one of the most hotly-contested and hardest-fought battles of the war. The Battery, with Gregg's Brigade, moved to about six miles north of Richmond, where the Light Division was formed under Major-General A. P. Hill, the Brigade and Batte
Mine Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
issons were frequently blown up. After Gettysburg the battery was engaged in affairs of more or less importance at Gaines' Cross Roads, on July 24, 1863, Shepherdstown on September 19th, Bristoe Station in October, Rixeyville on November 9th, Mine Run in December, and then had a resting spell until the spring of 1864, when Grant had been made commander-in-chief of all the Federal armies, and established headquarters with Meade. Grant first crossed swords with Lee in the Wilderness, May 5, 18, farrier, October 3, 1862. Franklin, Benjamin, private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Fergusson, E. C., private, August 28, 1863. Ferneyhough, E. S., Jr., private and corporal, May 14, 1862; served until surrender; wounded at Mine Run, 1863. Goolsby, J. C., private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender; slightly wounded at Chancellorsville May 3, 1863. Gray, John T., private, March 14, 1862; wounded at Sharpsburg September 17, 1862; dead. Gibson, John W., private,
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
a hasty retreat. The Crenshaw Battery was hurried to the front to take part in the attack on Gaines' Mill; it went into battery in an open field just in rear of the Gaines house, where it fought for, William B., Corporal, March 14, 1862; commissioned 2d Lieut., November 17, 1863; wounded at Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862; resigned March 9, 1865. Allegre, William R., Sergeant and Corporal, March n, James A., private, March 14, 1862. Caldwell, M. A., private, March 14, 1862; wounded at Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. Colquitt, Joseph H., private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Cprivate, November 14, 1863. Phillips, A., private and corporal, March 14, 1862; wounded at Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862, and badly wounded at Spotsylvania C. H., May 18, 1864; served until surrendern. Strother, Sidney, sergeant, March 14, 1862; died June 28, 1862, from wounds received at Gaines' Mill. Straughan, J. J., private, December 11, 1862. Thomas, J. J., first sergeant and corpor
Ford, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.44
1862; died June 5, 1862. Knowles, Marion, private, March 14, 1862; wounded in knee at Gaines Mill, June 27, 1862; permanently disabled. Kendall, H. S., private, March 14, 1861; discharged November 15, 1862. Latham, R. G., private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Lumsden, H. C., private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Luck, Marcellus, private, March 14, 1862; served until surrender. Lee, Daniel E., private, November 17, 1863; sent forward for orders from Ford's Depot, April 2, 1865; never heard from afterwards. Lewis, John, private, April 17, 1864. Leary, Emile, private, April 10, 1864 Lewis, William T., private, December 30, 1864; badly wounded in front of Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Lumsden, G. G., private, March 14, 1862; died July 3, 1862. Lumsden, C. L., private, March 14, 1862. Lancaster, D. M., private, March 14, 1862; died July 3, 1862. Loving, Taliaferro P., private, March 14, 1862; discharged May 18, 1864. Langford, T
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