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San Jacinto (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
k. By this desertion General Wool learned that Norfolk was being evacuated, and shortly after 12 o'clock the same day a squadron, composed of the ironclads Monitor and Naugatuck, gunboats Seminole and Dakotah and sloops-of-war Susquehanna and San Jacinto commenced to bombard the batteries at Sewell's Point, which were being dismantled. The Virginia at that time was taking in stores at the navyyard, but as soon as the bombardment commenced she started for the Roads to give battle to the bombd. This was her last challenge. Its historical accuracy can be verified by referring to a telegram of Commodore Goldsborough to President Lincoln, to abstracts from the logs of the Minnesota, Dakotah, Susquehanna, Naugatuck, St. Lawrence and San Jacinto, and to reports of Captain John P. Gillis, of the Seminole, and Lieutenant Constable, of the steamer E. A. Stevens. These reports are to be found on pages 330-1-2-3-4-5. The report, however, which contains the fullest information was that fu
Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
he same day a squadron, composed of the ironclads Monitor and Naugatuck, gunboats Seminole and Dakotah and sloops-of-war Susquehanna and San Jacinto commenced to bombard the batteries at Sewell's Point, which were being dismantled. The Virginia at that time was taking in stores at the navyyard, but as soon as the bombardment commenced she started for the Roads to give battle to the bombarding squadron. When she reached the neighborhood of Craney island, where there is a bend in the Elizabeth River, and came into view of the six vessels named, they all immediately returned to Old Point. She then proceeded to the neighborhood of the Rip-Raps and fired a shot to windward. This was her last challenge. Its historical accuracy can be verified by referring to a telegram of Commodore Goldsborough to President Lincoln, to abstracts from the logs of the Minnesota, Dakotah, Susquehanna, Naugatuck, St. Lawrence and San Jacinto, and to reports of Captain John P. Gillis, of the Seminole, an
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.35
J. B. White, had been instructed to proceed to Sewell's Point early on the morning of the 8th, and tow to Norn Jacinto commenced to bombard the batteries at Sewell's Point, which were being dismantled. The Virginia acription of the movement of six vessels against Sewell's Point and the appearance of the Virginia in Hampton R steamed away from her. They left off firing at Sewell's Point immediately on sighting her coming from NorfolkFederal fleet away, returned and anchored under Sewell's Point, where she now remains. The information conv 10th of May, two days after the bombardment of Sewell's Point. The Virginia was then lying in the river near, after dark, she turned to the neighborhood of Sewell's Point and transferred to one of the small gunboats tw Monitor and five other vessels were bombarding Sewell's Point, just two days before the evacuation of Norfoltil 12:15 P. M., when the Merrimac retreated to Sewell's Point and we went to the Minnesota and remained by he
Catesby Jones (search for this): chapter 1.35
did. The report of the second day's engagement, March 9th, made by Lieutenant Catesby Jones to Captain Buchanan, is very brief. Captain Buchanan's report embraceted to the Confederate Congress on the 10th of April, 1862. The report of Lieutenant Jones was as follows. At daylight on the 9th we saw that the Minnesota was stilny further injury we ceased firing at 12 o'clock and proceeded to Norfolk. Jones was Criticised unjustly. Lieutenant Jones was subjected to criticism for faiLieutenant Jones was subjected to criticism for failing to destroy the Minnesota when he had that vessel so completely in his power, and the Confederate naval authorities appeared to be dissatisfied with his action. ired to shoal water some time before the Virginia was headed for Norfolk. Lieutenant Jones, in his letter to Lieutenant Davidson, said: The action lasted four hours.ugh differently expressed, is in substance the same as that of Lieutenants Catesby Jones and Hunter Davidson—that the Monitor retired from the engagement before the
3. That on the 8th of May, 1862, when the Monitor and five other vessels were bombarding Sewell's Point, just two days before the evacuation of Norfolk, the entire squadron retired to Old Point as soon as the Virginia made her appearance near Craney Island. Going it alone. The Virginia on this last occasion was not accompanied by the small squadron that operated with her on the 8th and 9th of March, and on the 11th of April. She was alone, and had she been as vulnerable as Chief Engineer Stimer asserted, and as Assistant Secretary Fox hoped, surely there was no need for two iron-clads, two sloops-of-war and two gun-boats to retire to shelter as they did. The report of the second day's engagement, March 9th, made by Lieutenant Catesby Jones to Captain Buchanan, is very brief. Captain Buchanan's report embraced the operations of both days, March 8th and 9th. It is dated Naval Hospital, March 27th, 1862, and was forwarded to Secretary Mallory, who turned it over to Jeffer
Hunter Davidson (search for this): chapter 1.35
he Virginia, who had advised him to return to Norfolk when he did, and of the replies that he received, that of Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, dated October 25, 1862, was the most interesting, as it emphasized the fact that the Monitor retired to shoal water some time before the Virginia was headed for Norfolk. Lieutenant Jones, in his letter to Lieutenant Davidson, said: The action lasted four hours. We had run into the Monitor, causing us to leak, and received a shot from her which came near ding the machinery, but continued to fight her until she was driven into shoal water. The following is a portion of Lieutenant Davidson's letter: It can be found on pages 60 and 61: The Monitor engaged so much of your attention you had little taptain Van Brunt, although differently expressed, is in substance the same as that of Lieutenants Catesby Jones and Hunter Davidson—that the Monitor retired from the engagement before the Virginia did. The following items as to the anchor and be
Gideon Wells (search for this): chapter 1.35
the proper course for you to pursure, and that you had made the best fight of the two days engagement. From the other side. Lieutenant Greene, on March 12th, three days after the Sunday engagement between the ironclads, reported to Secretary Gideon Wells: Captain Worden then sent for me and told me to take charge of the vessel. We continued the action until 12:15 P. M., when the Merrimac retreated to Sewell's Point and we went to the Minnesota and remained by her until she was afloat. Evidently Lieutenant Greene, at the time this report was made, had been relieved of his command, as on page 92, in a report made to Secretary Wells by Captain John Marston, senior officer, dated March 1, 1862, this sentence occurs: I also yesterday ordered Lieutenant Thomas O. Selfridge to command the Monitor, the appointment subject to the approval of Flag Officer L. M. Goldsborough. As the engagement occurred on the 9th it would appear from the above that a new commander for the Monitor was a
for the past thirty-seven years. Learning that there was a possibility of the restoration of the original form of the famous vessel, in the form of a model, Mr. Cosgrove addressed the following letter to Hon. H. L. Maynard, representative from this district, offering to donate one of the beams to the government. In part he writes: My father got these beams thirty-seven years ago at Craney Island. With my two brothers brought the beams up to the old Cosgrove home in Park View, where they were landed. These beams are now part of the foundation of the old house and are in an excellent state of preservation. I am prepared to furnish affidavits as to their genuineness, if the government desires them for use in its exhibit. So far as The Star knows, Mr. Cosgrove is misinformed regarding the intention of the government or of the exposition to build a model of the Merrimac, but the fact remains that the original beams of the boat, together with the old anchor verified as
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 1.35
ash, of Norfolk, Va., of the career of the Confederate gunboat Virginia, or Merrimac, the first iron-clad warship the world has ever known. The operations of General Burnside in North Carolina, in the rear of Norfolk, and the transfer of General McClellan's army from the neighborhood of Washington to the Virginia Peninsula, between the York and James rivers, in the spring of 1862, caused the Confederate authorities to determine to evacuate Norfolk and vicinity to prevent the capture of the 1te of March 17th, page 27, says: We fired nothing but solid cast-iron shot, and when we were directly abeam of her (Merrimac) and hit her our shot went right through her. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, G. V. Fox, in a telegram to Major-General George B. McClellan, at Fairfax Courthouse, dated Navy Department, March 13th, page 100, says: The Monitor is more than a match for the Merrimac, but she might be disabled in the next encounter. * * * The Monitor may, and I think will, destroy the M
aptain Worden and the crew of the Monitor for their services in destroying the Virginia. A bill was passed in one branch of the Forty-second Congress making such an appropriation, but it failed to secure action in the other house. Eight years later the claim was revived, the bill authorizing an appropriation of $200,000. The whole subject of the Virginia's operations in Hampton Roads was carefuly investigated by the Committee on Naval Affairs of the House, and on the 31st of May, 1864, Mr. Ballentine, for the committee, submitted a very exhaustive report, which was adopted, rejecting the claim. The committee, in submitting the result of their labors, concluded their report in the following language: Holding to these views, we respectfully report adversely to the passage of the bill. This report can be found in the Congressional Record of May, 1884, and also in Volume XIII., Southern Historical Society Papers, published in 1885. The Virginia was 262 feet 9 inches long and she dre
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