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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
deeds. The article below is from the excellent pen of Major James McDowell Carrington, who in the battle of Gettysburg was captain of the Charlottesville Artillery, and is now a distinguished lawer of Washington city. The Major's statements confirm the close presence of General Early and Ewell on the field the first day at Gettysburg, and gives evidence as to one of the occasions upon which General Early advised an assault on Cemetery Hill that afternoon. Colonel Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, in his book, Four Years in the Saddle, tells almost identically the same story as Major Carrington. John G. Williams, Esq., a respected lawyer of high standing at Orange Courthouse, writes to the same effect on this topic, and I myself, was a personal witness of the fact, which I recall as if it were yesterday, of the message sent in my presence by General Early to General A. P. Hill before he met General Ewell, telling him that in his opinion assault should not be delayed, and that if
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
First day on left at Gettysburg. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 19, 1905. General Early's Advice—An oft-repeated incident corroborated by a witness who was there. Major James McDowell Carrington tells a thrilling story of thrilling deeds. The article below is from the excellent pen of Major James McDowell Carrington, who in the battle of Gettysburg was captain of the Charlottesville Artillery, and is now a distinguished lawer of Washington city. The Major's statements confirm the close presence of General Early and Ewell on the field the first day at Gettysburg, and gives evidence as to one of the occasions upon which General Early advised an assault on Cemetery Hill that afternoon. Colonel Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, in his book, Four Years in the Saddle, tells almost identically the same story as Major Carrington. John G. Williams, Esq., a respected lawyer of high standing at Orange Courthouse, writes to the same effect on this topic, and I my
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.34
First day on left at Gettysburg. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 19, 1905. General Early's Advice—An oft-repeated incident corroborated by a witness who was there. Major James McDowell Carrington tells a thrilling story of thrilling deeds. The article below is from the excellent pen of Major James McDowell Carrington, who in the battle of Gettysburg was captain of the Charlottesville Artillery, and is now a distinguished lawer of Washington city. The Major's statements confirm the close presence of General Early and Ewell on the field the first day at Gettysburg, and gives evidence as to one of the occasions upon which General Early advised an assault on Cemetery Hill that afternoon. Colonel Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, in his book, Four Years in the Saddle, tells almost identically the same story as Major Carrington. John G. Williams, Esq., a respected lawyer of high standing at Orange Courthouse, writes to the same effect on this topic, and I my
A. W. Garber (search for this): chapter 1.34
anded it in that momentous struggle. This battery was one of four which composed Jones' Battalion, the other three being Courtney Artillery, Captain W. A. Tanner; Louisiana Guard Artillery, Captain C. A. Green, and the Staunton Artillery, Captain A. W. Garber. This battalion composed the artillery of Early's Division. Permit me to say just here that I think I knew General Early as well as could be expected of a young officer of my rank. I knew of him before the war; he was quite an intimate ese Federal batteries responded almost simultaneously with the firing of our own, and it was at this point that the remarkable incident occurred of a solid shot from one of the enemy's guns entering and lodging in the muzzle of one of the guns of Garber's Battery. I suppose this is the only occurrence of the kind on record. While these batteries were thus engaged, I and my men became a little impatient, and General Early passed by towards the front. He paused for a moment, and I playfully sta
Stephen W. Gordon (search for this): chapter 1.34
e. The truth is, no one ever had an idea that Gordon's brigade could have accomplished it, and at tism upon him. I had also great respect for General Gordon, and admiration for that distinguished off of ten or fifteen minutes elapsed, when I saw Gordon's men on the southern side of the creek gallanenemy in the open field I have described. General Gordon in leading them presented a splendid pictu in front of me over Rock Creek, and follow up Gordon's men. My recollection is General Early gave mto be some halt or cessation, momentary in General Gordon's fire, which I did not understand. Genernts afterwards the fight began again, in which Gordon's, Hoke's and Hay's brigades participated, and I do not know that General Early did; and General Gordon's attention, of course, was directed to th remember worthy of mention during the day. Gordon, Early, Ewell (?), Longstreet and Lee. I do have occurred if Jackson had been there. General Gordon continues and says that he longed for the [16 more...]
onfirm the close presence of General Early and Ewell on the field the first day at Gettysburg, and Early to General A. P. Hill before he met General Ewell, telling him that in his opinion assault shem near the muzzle of the guns. I notice General Ewell says, in his report of the battle: So far ate and further advance. I could not hear General Ewell's language, but evidently General Ewell's On the first day neither General Early nor General Ewell could possibly have been fully cognizant oive his views about it, in order to shield General Ewell from adverse criticism. Now, what does e up. Evidently there was a good deal for General Ewell to think about. In another part of his reged), was close to the town. Now, that is General Ewell's reasons assigned for not pushing the advny different opinions upon the subject. General Ewell defended. But what does General Lee sayer see the justice of the criticisms upon General Ewell. In fact, I think they are unjust, and I [10 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 1.34
At first I declined them, reminding him of General Lee's strict orders in regard to such things. f Ohio. I have never heard personally from Governor Lee since. I then rode back to General Early. stance to their appeal. We did not hear of General Lee's appearance about our lines, I should thinis. Then it became rumored amongst us that General Lee was on the grounds. Of course, I knew nothay. Gordon, Early, Ewell (?), Longstreet and Lee. I do not think General Gordon ever intendedhalt was accompanied by an explanation that General Lee was several miles away, and did not wish to He then goes on with the old story of what General Lee is said to have said about what would have General Ewell defended. But what does General Lee say? General Ewell was therefore instructet reach Gettysburg until a late hour. Now, General Lee left ie entirely to the discretion of his ss not entirely magnanimity upon the part of General Lee and General Ewell was very much influenced [2 more...]
John G. Williams (search for this): chapter 1.34
ettysburg was captain of the Charlottesville Artillery, and is now a distinguished lawer of Washington city. The Major's statements confirm the close presence of General Early and Ewell on the field the first day at Gettysburg, and gives evidence as to one of the occasions upon which General Early advised an assault on Cemetery Hill that afternoon. Colonel Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, in his book, Four Years in the Saddle, tells almost identically the same story as Major Carrington. John G. Williams, Esq., a respected lawyer of high standing at Orange Courthouse, writes to the same effect on this topic, and I myself, was a personal witness of the fact, which I recall as if it were yesterday, of the message sent in my presence by General Early to General A. P. Hill before he met General Ewell, telling him that in his opinion assault should not be delayed, and that if General Hill would put in his corps, he, Early, would take the responsibility of joining the assault without waiting.
hat General Early levied a contribution upon the citizens of York to satisfy the urgent necessities of his men; but I do not know that he contracted to pay for these things some time after the independence of the Confederacy. It sounds a little characteristic of the old general, and like one of his jokes. Perhapes he had faith in the ultimate independence of the Confederacy, and considered he was making an honest contract. Maybe it was attributed to him as many jokes were attributed to Mr. Lincoln without any foundation. However, I think it was a fact that his men were more comfortable when they left York than when they entered. On the morning of June 30th, we left York and moved along the turnpike towards Heddlersburg. After resting that night near that village, Early's Division, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hilary P. Jones' Battalion of Artillery accompanying it, marched toward Gettysburg, which was south of us, and near which we could hear the roar of the battle, in which Lieute
James McDowell Carrington (search for this): chapter 1.34
incident corroborated by a witness who was there. Major James McDowell Carrington tells a thrilling story of thrilling deeds. The article below is from the excellent pen of Major James McDowell Carrington, who in the battle of Gettysburg was captain of the Charlottesvilears in the Saddle, tells almost identically the same story as Major Carrington. John G. Williams, Esq., a respected lawyer of high standintime when Hay's and Hoke's Brigade (under Colonel Avery), and Captain Carrington's Artillery was being brought forward by Early on Gordon's lesuccessful assault to which he makes no reference whatever. Major Carrington does not refer to the intervening facts which induced General he enemy were there appearing, and of this in all probability Major Carrington was not apprised at the time of the battle. Circumstances of ve often been related and it is needless to repeat them here. Major Carrington's article presents certain phases of the first day's fight acc
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