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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
an forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held out to the proprietaries a hope of revenue from colonial customs, to be imposed in colonial ports by Carolina legislatures; another gave them the power of erecting cities and manors, counties and baronies, and of establishing orders of nobility, with other than English titles. It was evident that the founding of an empire was contemplated; for the power to levy troops, to erect fortificatio
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 3
s to the Proprietors of Carolina, small 4to. The grant had hardly been made before it became apparent that there were competitors, claiming possession of the same territory. It was included by the Spaniards within the limits of Florida; and the castle of St. Augustine was deemed proof of the actual possession of an indefinite adjacent country. Spain had never formally acknowledged the English title to any possessions in America; and when a treaty was 1667. May 23. finally concluded at Madrid, it did but faintly concede the right of England to her transatlantic colonies, and to a continuance of commerce in the accustomed seas. And not Spain only claimed Carolina. In 1630, a patent for all the territory had been issued to Sir Robert Heath; and there is room to believe that, in 1639, permanent plantations were planned and perhaps attempted by his assign. Hening, i. 552. Records in the office of the general court at Richmond, labelled No. 1, 1639—1642, p. 70. William Hawley
Mare Cantabricum (search for this): chapter 3
olina, the general asylum of the Calvinist refugees. Escaping from a land where the profession of their religion was a felony, where their estates were liable to be confiscated in favor of the apostate, where the preaching of their faith was a crime to be expiated on the wheel, where their children might be torn from them, to be subjected to the nearest Catholic relation, —the fugitives from Languedoc on the Mediterranean, from Rochelle, and Saintange, and Bordeaux, the provinces on the Bay of Biscay, from St. Quentin, Poictiers, and the beautiful valley of Tours, from St. Lo and Dieppe, men who had the virtues of the English Puritans, without their bigotry, came to the land to which the tolerant benevolence of Shaftesbury had invited the believer of every creed. From a land that had suffered its king, in wanton bigotry, to drive half a million of its best citizens into exile, they came to the land which was the hospitable refuge of the oppressed; where superstition and fanaticism,
South River, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
n. Yet they intrusted the affair entirely to Sir William's management. He was to get settlers as cheaply as possible; yet at any rate to get settlers. Like Massachusetts, Virginia was the mother of a Chap XIII.} cluster of states; like the towns of New England, the plantations of Virginia extended along the sea. The country on Nansemund River had been settled as early as 1609; in 1622, the adventurous Porey, then secre- 1622. Feb. tary of the Old Dominion, travelled over land to the South River, Chowan, and, on his return, celebrated the kindness of the native people, the fertility of the country, and the happy climate, that yielded two harvests in each year. Smith's Virginia, II. 64. If no immediate colonization ensued, if the plans formed in England by Sir Robert Heath, or by Lord Maltravers, Heath's assign, were never realized, the desire of extending the settlements to the south still prevailed in Virginia; and twenty years after the excursion of Porey, a company 1642 Ja
Pacific Ocean (search for this): chapter 3
d the nature of colonial trade, managed its affairs without reproach. Williamson, i. 100. Meantime the proprietaries, having collected minute information respecting the coast, had learned to covet an extension of their domains; and, indifferent to the claims of Virginia, and in open contempt of the garrison of Spain at St. Augustine, the covetous Clarendon and his associates easily 1665 June 13. obtained from the king a new charter, which granted to them, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, all the land lying between twenty-nine degrees and Chap. XIII.} 1665. thirty-six degrees thirty minutes, north latitude; a territory extending seven and a half degrees from north to south, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal
Languedoc (France) (search for this): chapter 3
orted from the predecessors of Henry IV. And yet it was the harbinger of religious peace; so long as the edict of Nantz was honestly respected, the Huguenots of Languedoc were as tranquil as the Lutherans of Alsace. But their tranquillity invited from their enemies a renewal of attacks; no longer a powerful faction, they were opptts contributed liberally to their support, and provided them with lands. Others repaired to New York; but the warmer climate was more inviting to the exiles of Languedoc, and South Carolina became the chief resort of the Huguenots. What though the attempt to emigrate was by the law of France a felony? In spite of every precautiaith was a crime to be expiated on the wheel, where their children might be torn from them, to be subjected to the nearest Catholic relation, —the fugitives from Languedoc on the Mediterranean, from Rochelle, and Saintange, and Bordeaux, the provinces on the Bay of Biscay, from St. Quentin, Poictiers, and the beautiful valley of To
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
1665 June 13. obtained from the king a new charter, which granted to them, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, all the land lying between twenty-nine degrees and Chap. XIII.} 1665. thirty-six degrees thirty minutes, north latitude; a territory extending seven and a half degrees from north to south, and more than forty degrees from east to west; comprising all the territory of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, much of Florida and Missouri, nearly all of Texas, and a large portion of Mexico. The soil, and, under the limitation of a nominal allegiance, the sovereignty also, were theirs, with the power of legislation, subject to the consent of the future freemen of the colony. The grant of privileges was ample, like those to Rhode Island and Connecticut. An express clause in the charter for Carolina opened the way for religious freedom; another held out to the proprietaries a hope of revenue from colonial customs, to be impo
Barbados (Barbados) (search for this): chapter 3
e scare of friendly Indians; Journal of Gentlemen from Barbadoes, in Lawson, 72, 73. and the emigrants, revisiting their fo the southern part of our republic. Several planters of Barbadoes, dissatisfied with their condition, and desiring to estabeedy baronet, who, to mend his fortune, had become a 1663 Barbadoes planter, was appointed governor, with a jurisdiction exteonducted, in the autumn of 1665, a band of emigrants from Barbadoes, and on the south bank of Cape Fear River laid the foundadvances; it exported boards, and shingles, and staves, to Barbadoes. The little traffic was profitable, and was continued; eed souls. Many preferred it, as a place of residence, to Barbadoes, and Yeamans, who understood the nature of colonial tradeSpaniards would tolerate. Having touched at Ireland and Barbadoes, Chalmers, 529, says Barbadoes; and not inadvertently. able man-servant, negroes as well as Christians. From Barbadoes arrived Sir John Yeamans, with 1671. African slaves.
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
exultation, that the northern country of Carolina had been explored by Virginians born. We are not left to conjecture, who of the inhabit- Chap. XIII.} ants of Nansemund of that day first traversed the intervening forests and came upon the rivers that flow into Albemarle Sound. The company was led by Roger Green, and his services were rewarded by the 1653. July. grant of a thousand acres, while ten thousand acres were offered to any hundred persons who would plant on the banks of the Roanoke, or on the south side of the Chowan and its tributary streams. Hening, i. 380, 381. These conditional grants seem not to have taken effect; yet the enterprise of Virginia did not flag; and Thomas Dew, 1656. Dec. once the speaker of the assembly, formed a plan for exploring the navigable rivers still further to the south, between Cape Hatteras and Cape Fear. Ibid. 422. How far this spirit of discovery led to immediate emigration, it is not possible to determine. The county of Nansemu
Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
arded by the 1653. July. grant of a thousand acres, while ten thousand acres were offered to any hundred persons who would plant on the banks of the Roanoke, or on the south side of the Chowan and its tributary streams. Hening, i. 380, 381. These conditional grants seem not to have taken effect; yet the enterprise of Virginia did not flag; and Thomas Dew, 1656. Dec. once the speaker of the assembly, formed a plan for exploring the navigable rivers still further to the south, between Cape Hatteras and Cape Fear. Ibid. 422. How far this spirit of discovery led to immediate emigration, it is not possible to determine. The county of Nansemund had long abounded in non-conformists; Winthrop, II. 334. Johnson's Wonderw. Prov. B. III. c. XI. and it is certain the first settlements on Albemarle Sound were a result of spontaneous overflowings from Virginia. Perhaps a few vagrant families were planted within the limits of Carolina Williamson, i. 79, 91, and note on 93. Willia
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