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Halifax (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
lection of Councillors, he disapprov- Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. ed of no less than eleven; among them of Brattle and Bowdoin, who had been chosen by a unanimous vote. Bradford's History of Massachusetts, i. 185. The House then considered the presence among them of troops, over whom the Governor avowed that the civil power in the Province did not extend. At that very time Gage, who had been intrusted with discretionary authority to withdraw the forces from Boston, ordered two regiments to Halifax, and required Bernard's written opinion respecting the proper disposition of the rest. Gage to Mackay, 4 June, 1769; Mackay to Gov. Gage, 12 June. 1769. After some hesitation, Bernard to Gage, 12 June, 1769. and after conferring with his associates, Bernard reported it to be the opinion of all that the removal of the troops at that time would have very dangerous consequences; Bernard to Gage, 19 June, 1769. and that it would be quite ruinous to the cause of the Crown to draw th
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
settlement of the wilderness, of which France had reserved no portion and Spain and England feared to develope the resources, was promoted by native Pioneers. Jonathan Carver of Connecticut, had in three former years explored the borders of Lake Superior, and the country of the Sioux beyond it; Bernard to the Earl of Hillsborough; Same to Lord Barrington and to Fitzherbert, 21 February, 1769. had obtained more accurate accounts of that Great River, which bore, as he reported, the name of Oregon The Oregon or the River of the West. Carver's Travels, 76. and flowed into the Pacific; and he now returned to claim reward for his discoveries, to celebrate the richness of the copper mines of the Northwest; to recommend English settlements on the western extremity of the continent; and to propose opening, by aid of Lakes and Rivers, a passage across the continent, as the best route for communicating with China and the East Indies. Carver's Travels through the interior parts of North
Westminster (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
y, 1769. Since the propo- Chap. XLI.} 1769. May. sal to ship Samuel Adams, Otis, and their chief supporters across the water had come to naught, the cabal were left without a plan of conduct. The Regiments which had been sent at their suggestion were pronounced to be useless, because they were inactive. Disheartened by the appearance of moderation in the British Government, they complained that their accusations which had, as they thought, been fully certified, had not been noticed at Westminster for Treason. The choice of Representatives showed the sense of the people. The town of Boston, on coming together, demanded the withdrawal of the soldiery during the election; but they were only confined within the barracks while the ballot was taken. Of five hundred and eight votes that were cast, the four old representatives, Otis, Cushing, Samuel Adams, and Hancock, received more than five hundred. They were instructed to insist on the departure of the army from the town and Prov
Fort Hill (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
sponded when conciliation prevailed in England. The officers of the army and the navy despised him for his cowardice and duplicity, and did not conceal their contempt. He has essentially served us, said the patriot clergyman Cooper; Cooper to Gov. Pownall, 11 May, 1769. had he been wise, our liberties might have been lost. As he departed from Boston, the bells were rung, and cannon fired from the wharfs; Liberty Tree was gay with flags; and at night a great bonfire was kindled upon Fort Hill. When be reached England, he found that the Ministry had promised Chap. XLI.} 1769. July. the London merchants never to employ him in America again. Frances to Choiseul, 11 August, 1769. And yet he was the Governor whom they had most trusted; for bad men fit bad ends; and the selfish oligarchy by which England was then governed, feeling themselves rebuked by the noble and the free, hated them as dangerous to their rule. Aristotle's Politics, v. c. IX. While Boston was advancin
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 18
as men of other nations, censured the sanguinary revenge. In the several parishes of Louisiana O'Reilly was received with silence and submission. The King of Spain approved his acts; and the Council for the Indies found in his administration nothing but evidence of the immensity and sublimity of his genius. Gayarreas Hist. II. 378. Aubry perished on his voyage to France, in a ship which foundered in the Garonne. The son of Masan, one of those condemned to imprisonment, made his way to Madrid, offering himself as his father's substitute; by the aid of France the six prisoners were set free. The census of the city of New Orleans showed a population of eighteen hundred and one white persons, thirty-one free blacks, sixty-eight free persons of mixed blood; sixty domiciliated Indians; and twelve hundred and twenty-five slaves; in all three thousand one hundred and ninety souls. The whole population in the valley of the Mississippi, then subject to the Spanish sway, is estimated a
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ns, cooled during the summer by the ever blowing West wind, were left vacant for the white man. Connecticut which at this time was exercising a disputed jurisdiction in the valley of Wyoming, Compare Minutes of the Provincial Council, in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a company of military Adventurers, headed by one of its Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. did not forget that by its Charter, its possessions extended indefinitely to the West; and a company of military Adventurers, headed by one of its most intelligent sons, Timothy Dwight's Travels in New England and New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was
Bucks County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
Timothy Dwight's Travels in New England and New-York, i. 308. was also soliciting leave from the Government in England to lead forth a Colony to the southwestern banks of the Mississippi. W. S. Johnson to Jos. Trumbull, 15 April, 1769. Compare Martin's Louisiana, II. 35; Monette's Valley of the Mississippi, i. 407, 408. In his peaceful habitation on the banks of the Yadkin River, in North Carolina, Daniel Boone, Boone was born in Virginia, McLung, 49. Boone was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on the right bank of the Delaware river, Collins, 182. Boone was born in Maryland, Marshall, i. 17. The advancing settlements of Schuylkill, Morehead, 17. Bridgeworth, Somersetshire, England, Niles, IV. 33, confounding perhaps the birth-place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T.
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
1769. Its system of restriction struck its victim to the The settlement of the wilderness, of which France had reserved no portion and Spain and England feared to develope the resources, was promoted by native Pioneers. Jonathan Carver of Connecticut, had in three former years explored the borders of Lake Superior, and the country of the Sioux beyond it; Bernard to the Earl of Hillsborough; Same to Lord Barrington and to Fitzherbert, 21 February, 1769. had obtained more accurate account Report concerning the Indians inhabiting the Western Parts of the United States; Mass. Hist. Coll. XII. 8. and their beautiful and fertile plains, cooled during the summer by the ever blowing West wind, were left vacant for the white man. Connecticut which at this time was exercising a disputed jurisdiction in the valley of Wyoming, Compare Minutes of the Provincial Council, in Pennsylvania Colonial Records, IX. 606-609. Pennsylvania Archives, IV. 342-344. Miner's History of Wyoming. d
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
place of his father, with that of Daniel Boone himself. Daniel himself does not seem to have thought about where or when he was born. Filson writes the name Boon. the illustrious hunter, had heard Finley, a trader, so memorable Compare J. T. Morehead's Address in commemoration, &c. 16, and Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 7, 8. as the Pioneer, describe a tract of land west of Virginia, as the richest in North America or in the world. Filson's Discovery, Settlement and Present State of Kentucky, published in 1784, and authenticated by a certificate from Boone and Todd and Harrod. In May 1769, leaving his wife and offspring, having Finley as his pilot, and four others as Chap. XLI.} 1769. companions, the Marshall's History of Kentucky, i. 17. Morehead's Address, 17; compare J. M. Peck in the American Pioneers, i. 243. Boone died in 1820; Niles' Register, IV. 33, brings him into the world in 1730. Monette, i. 363, gives him a son of nearly twenty years old in 1773. Boo
Boone, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ometimes there were hundreds in a drove, and round the salt-licks their numbers were amazing. Boone's Autobiography. The summer in which for the first time, a party of white men enjoyed the brssed away in the oc- Chap. XLI.} cupations of exploring parties and the chase. But one by one, Boone's companions dropped off, till he was left alone with John Stewart. They jointly found unceasinken prisoners by a band of Indians, wanderers like themselves. They escaped; and were joined by Boone's brother; so that when Stewart was soon after killed by savages, the first victim among the hecimself, without bread, or salt, or sugar, or even a horse or dog. The idea of a beloved wife Boone's Autobiography in Imlay, 341. anxious for his safety, tinged his thoughts with sadness; but othl. All things were still.—Not a breeze shook the most tremulous leaf.—I kindled a fire, &c. &c. Boone's Autobiography in Imlay, 342. Not a breeze so much as shook a leaf. He kindled a fire near a f
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