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Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
their cause into their own hands; they demanded institutions like those of Connecticut, and set themselves inflexibly against any proposal for a Government, which should be irresponsible to themselves. In 1771, they had assembled in a General Meeting, and had fixed upon their scheme; they never departed from it; expecting to appoint their own Governor and all civil Magistrates. Hamilton to Gage, 8 Aug. 1772. The rights of freemen were demanded as boldly on the Prairies of Illinois as in Carolina or New England. Towards the people at Vincennes, Hillsborough was less relenting; for there was no Spanish shore to which they could fly. They were, by formal proclamation, peremptorily commanded to retire within the jurisdiction of some one of the Colonies. Proclamation of 8 April, 1772. Compare Gage to Hillsborough, 4 March, 1772. But the men Compare Inhabitants of Vincennes to Gage, 18 Sept. 1772, and Memorial of the same date. of Indiana were as unwilling to abandon their homes
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
al subjects. Deeply impressed with these sentiments, we most humbly beseech your Majesty to remove all those restraints on your Majesty's Governors of this Colony which inhibit their assenting to such laws, as might Chap. XLVII.} 1772. May. check so very pernicious a commerce. In this manner Virginia led the host, who alike condemned slavery and opposed the Slave-Trade. Thousands in Maryland and in New Jersey, were ready to adopt a similar Petition; so were the Legislatures of North Carolina, of Pennsylvania, of New-York. Massachusetts, in its towns and in its Legislature, unceasingly combated the condition as well as the sale of slaves. There was no jealousy among one another in the strife against the crying evil; Virginia harmonized all opinions, and represented the moral sentiment and policy of them all. When her Prayer reached England, Franklin through the Press called to it the sympathy of the people; again and again it was pressed upon the attention of the Ministers.
Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
tors be sacrificed to the rage of the people whom they had deluded. Hutchinson to Secretary John Pownall, 21 July, 1772; in Remembrancer, 1776, II. 57. The Secretary, on his Aug. part, was proceeding with eager haste to carry Townshend's system into effect; and on the seventh of August, he announced, that the King, with the entire concurrence of Lord North, Compare Hillsborough to Hutchinson, 6 June, 1772. had made provision for the support of his law servants in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Hillsborough to Lords of Trade, 27 July, 1772, and to Hutchinson, 7 August, 1772. It was almost a special provision for Hutchinson's family. It marks the character of the people, that this act, constituting judges, who held their offices at the King's pleasure, stipendiaries of the Crown, was selected as the crisis Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Aug. of revolution. Meantime Hillsborough was left with few supporters except the herd of flatterers who had soothed his vanity, and by their m
Vincennes (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
parted from it; expecting to appoint their own Governor and all civil Magistrates. Hamilton to Gage, 8 Aug. 1772. The rights of freemen were demanded as boldly on the Prairies of Illinois as in Carolina or New England. Towards the people at Vincennes, Hillsborough was less relenting; for there was no Spanish shore to which they could fly. They were, by formal proclamation, peremptorily commanded to retire within the jurisdiction of some one of the Colonies. Proclamation of 8 April, 1772. Compare Gage to Hillsborough, 4 March, 1772. But the men Compare Inhabitants of Vincennes to Gage, 18 Sept. 1772, and Memorial of the same date. of Indiana were as unwilling to abandon their homes in a settlement already seventy years old, Notre établissement est de soixante et dix annees, Memorial, 18 Sept. 1772. as those of Illinois to give up the hope of freedom. The spirit of discontent pervaded every village in the wilderness; and what allegiance would men of French origin bear to a
Cornwall (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
ingled with patriotism, that the Government hoped to separate him from its uncompromising opponents. Hutchinson to,——, 5 June, 1771. The Assembly which for the third year was convened at Cambridge, overruled the advice of Samuel Adams, and was proceeding with business. Yet it adopted the Protest in which he drew the distinction between the existence of a prerogative and its abuse; and significantly inquired, what would follow in England, if a British King should call a Parliament in Cornwall and keep it there seven years. Nor did he omit to expose the rapid consolidation of power in the hands of the executive by the double process of making all civil officers dependent for support solely on the King, and giving to arbitrary instructions an authority paramount to the Charter and the laws. The Protest had hardly been adopted, when the July. application of its doctrines became necessary. The Commissioners of the Customs had through Hutchinson Hutchinson to Hillsborough, 20
Bristol (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
f Justice Horsmanden in January, 1773. On the ninth of June, the Providence Packet was returning to Providence, and proud of its speed, went gayly on, heedless of the Gaspee. Dudingston gave chase. The tide being at flood, the Packet ventured near shore; the Gaspee confidently followed; and drawing more water ran aground on Nauquit, a little below Pantuxet. The following night a party of men in six or seven boats, led by John Brown and Joseph Brown of Providence, and Simeon Potter of Bristol, boarded the stranded schooner, after a scuffle in which Dudingston was wounded, took and landed its crew, and then set it on fire. Lieutenant Dudingston to Admiral Montagu, 12 June, 1772; William Checkley to Commissioner of Customs, 12 June, 1772; Governor Wanton to Hillsborough, 16 June, 1772; Admiral Montagu to Hillsborough, 12 June and 11 July, 1772; Deposition of Aaron, a negro, 11 July, 1772; Letter of Charles Dudley, 23 July, 1772. The whole was conducted on a sudden impulse; R
Pittsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
guillon, 11 August, 1772. Franklin persuaded Hertford, a friend of the King's, Gower the President of the Council, Camden, the Secretaries of the Treasury, W. Duer to Robert R. Livingston Jr., London, 3 August, 1772. and others to become shareholders in his scheme; by their influence, the Lords of Council disregarded the adverse report of the Board of Trade, and decided in favor of planting the new Province. Order in Council, 14 Aug. 1772. Compare Propositions for the Settlement of Pittsylvania, and the Memorial of Franklin and Wharton to the American Congress. Hillsborough was too proud to brook this public insult; and the King, soothing his fall by a patent for a British Earldom, accepted his resignation. But his system remained behind him. When he was gone, Thurlow Knox: Extra Official State Papers, II. 45. took care that the grant for the Western Province should never be sealed; and the amiable Dartmouth, Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Aug. who became Secretary for the Colonies,
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
em. Dunmore to Hillsborough, 1 May, 1772. Anthony Benezet to Granville Sharp, 14 May, 1772. Jefferson, like Richard Henry Lee, had begun his legislative career by efforts for emancipation. To the Chap. XLVII.} 1772. April. mind of Patrick Henry, the thought of slavery darkened the picture of the future, even while he cherished faith in the ultimate abolition of an evil, which, though the law sanctioned, religion opposed. Compare Patrick Henry to Anthony Benezet, 18 Jan. 1773; in Patrick Henry to Anthony Benezet, 18 Jan. 1773; in Robert Vaux's Life of Benezet. To have approached Parliament with a Petition against the Slave-Trade might have seemed a recognition of its supreme legislative power; Virginia, therefore, resolved to address the King himself, who in Council had cruelly compelled the toleration of the nefarious traffic. They pleaded with him for leave to protect themselves against the crimes of commercial avarice, and these were their words: The importation of slaves into the Colonies from the Coast of Af
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
n to the Governor, and if a Custom House officer, without being sworn into his office, was guilty of a trespass, if not piracy. The Governor, therefore, sent a sheriff on board the Gaspee, to ascertain by what orders the Lieutenant acted; and Dudingston referred the subject to the Admiral. The Admiral answered from Boston: The Lieutenant, Sir, has done his duty. I shall give the King's officers directions, that they send every man taken in molesting them to me. As sure as the people of Newport attempt to rescue any vessel, and any of them Compare W. S. Johnson to R. Jackson, 30 May, 1772. are taken, I will hang them as pirates. Montagu to J. Wanton, Esq., Boston, 8 April, 1772. J. Wanton to Rear Admiral Montagu, 8 May, 1772. Dudings- Chap. XLVII.} 1772. June. ton seconded the insolence of his superior officer, insulted the inhabitants, plundered the islands of sheep and hogs, cut down trees, fired at market boats, detained vessels without a colorable pretext, and made i
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
boldly on the Prairies of Illinois as in Carolina or New England. Towards the people at Vincennes, Hillsborough was less relenting; for there was no Spanish shore to which they could fly. They were, by formal proclamation, peremptorily commanded to retire within the jurisdiction of some one of the Colonies. Proclamation of 8 April, 1772. Compare Gage to Hillsborough, 4 March, 1772. But the men Compare Inhabitants of Vincennes to Gage, 18 Sept. 1772, and Memorial of the same date. of Indiana were as unwilling to abandon their homes in a settlement already seventy years old, Notre établissement est de soixante et dix annees, Memorial, 18 Sept. 1772. as those of Illinois to give up the hope of freedom. The spirit of discontent pervaded every village in the wilderness; and what allegiance would men of French origin bear to a British King who proposed to take away their estates and to deny them liberty? The log cabins having been planted, and hopes of self-government called int
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