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Chapter 54: The siege of Quebec. November—December, 1775. The day before Montgomery entered Montreal, Chap. LIV.} 1775 Nov. Carleton, with more than a hundred regulars and Canadians, embarked on board some small vessels in the port to descend to Quebec. He was detained in the river for several days by contrary winds, and moreover he found the St. Lawrence, near the mouth of the Sorel, guarded by continental troops under Easton. On the seventeenth of November, Prescott, the brigadier who had so lately treated Allen with insolent cruelty, surrendered the flotilla of eleven sail with all the soldiers, sailors, and stores on board; but in the darkest hour of the previous night, Carleton, entering a small boat in the disguise of a peasant, had been safely paddled through the islands that lie opposite the Sorel. Touching as a fugitive at Trois Rivieres, he arrived on the nineteenth at Quebec, where his presence diffused joy and confidence among the loyal. Thus far he had sh
Dec. cember, at Point aux Trembles, made a junction with Arnold. The famine-proof veterans, now but six hundred and seventh, a council was held by all the commissioned officers of Arnold's detachment, and a large majority voted for making an ass As the time for the assault drew near, three captains in Arnold's battalion, whose term of service was soon to expire, crentented would cease. At sundown of Christmas he reviewed Arnold's battalion at Morgan's quarters, and ad- Chap. LIV.} 177al for beginning the real attacks on the lower town, under Arnold from the west and north, under Montgomery from the south arther loss. On the northeastern side of the lower town, Arnold led the forlorn hope, which consisted of more than twice a. LIV.} 1775. Dec.beach and the precipice. Near this spot Arnold was severely wounded in the leg by a musket ball and carriton free to concentrate all his force against the party of Arnold. By his orders a sally was now made from Palace Gate, in
Chapter 54: The siege of Quebec. November—December, 1775. The day before Montgomery entered Montreal, Chap. LIV.} 1775 Nov. Carleton, with more than a hundred regulars and Canadians, embarked on board some small vessels in the port to descend to Quebec. He was detained in the river for several days by contrary winds, and moreover he found the St. Lawrence, near the mouth of the Sorel, guarded by continental troops under Easton. On the seventeenth of November, Prescott, the brigadier who had so lately treated Allen with insolent cruelty, surrendered the flotilla of eleven sail with all the soldiers, sailors, and stores on board; but in the darkest hour of the previous night, Carleton, entering a small boat in the disguise of a peasant, had been safely paddled through the islands that lie opposite the Sorel. Touching as a fugitive at Trois Rivieres, he arrived on the nineteenth at Quebec, where his presence diffused joy and confidence among the loyal. Thus far he had sh
John Coffin (search for this): chapter 14
se built of logs and extending on the south nearly to the river, with loopholes for musketry and a battery of two three-pounders, intercepted the passage. It was held by a party consisting of thirty Canadian and eight British militiamen under John Coffin, with nine seamen under Barnsfare, the master of a transport, as cannoniers. The general listened, and heard no sound; and it was afterwards thought that the guard was not on the alert; but lights from lanterns on the plains of Abraham, as well as the signal rockets, had given the alarm; and at daybreak, through the storm, the body of troops was seen in full march from Wolfe's Cove. At their approach to the barrier, a part of the guard was scared with a panic; but Coffin, who during the siege had never missed an hour's duty, restored order, and the sailors stood at their guns with lighted linstocks. Montgomery waited till about sixty men had joined him inside of the row of pickets; then exclaiming, Men of New York, you will not
George Fox (search for this): chapter 14
ding up the British commanders in review, pronounced a glowing tribute to his superior merits. Edmund Burke contrasted the condition of the eight thousand men, starved, disgraced, and shut up within the single town of Boston, with the movements of the hero who in one campaign had conquered two thirds of Canada. I, replied North, cannot join in lamenting the death of Montgomery as a public loss. He was brave, he was able, he was humane, he was generous; but still he was only a brave, able, humane, and generous rebel. Curse on his virtues, they've undone his country. The term of rebel, retorted Fox, is no certain mark of disgrace. All the great assertors of liberty, the saviors of their country, the benefactors of mankind in all ages, have been called rebels. We owe the constitution which enables us to sit in this house to a rebellion. So passed away the spirit of Montgomery, with the love of all that knew him, the grief of the nascent republic, and the eulogies of the world.
Charles Porterfield (search for this): chapter 14
} 1775. Dec.beach and the precipice. Near this spot Arnold was severely wounded in the leg by a musket ball and carried off disabled; but Morgan's men, who formed the van, rushed forward to the portholes and fired into them, while others, Charles Porterfield the first, Morgan himself the second, mounted by ladders, carried the battery, and took its captain and guard prisoners. But Morgan was at first followed only by his own company and a few Pennsylvanians. It was still very dark; he had nou Matelot street, where the defences extended from the rock to the river. Under the direction of Greene, heroic efforts were made to carry them. With a voice louder than the northeast gale, Morgan cheered on his riflemen; but though Heth and Porterfield and a few others in the front files ascended the scaling ladders, it was only to see on the other side rows of troops prepared to receive them on hedges of bayonets if they had leaped down. Here was the greatest loss of life; some of the Amer
not to fall, and they could not keep their arms dry. The signal from Cape Diamond being given more than half an hour too soon, the general with his aidede-camps, Macpherson and Burr, pushed on with the front, composed of Cheesman's company and Mott's; and more than half an hour before day they arrived at the first barrier, with the guides and carpenters. The rest of the party lagged behind; and the ladders were not within half a mile. Montgomery and Cheesman were the first that entered thot, Barnsfare discharged them with dead- Chap. LIV.} 1775. Dec. ly aim. Montgomery, his aid Macpherson, the young and gallant Cheesman, and ten others, instantly fell dead; Montgomery from three wounds. With him the soul of the expedition fled. Mott was eager to go forward; but some of the men complained that their arms were wet; one or more of the officers thought nothing further could be attempted with wearied troops and no arm but the bayonet; fireballs were thrown by the enemy to light up
mery entered Montreal, Chap. LIV.} 1775 Nov. Carleton, with more than a hundred regulars and Canadiut in the darkest hour of the previous night, Carleton, entering a small boat in the disguise of a ps of capitulation. But on the twenty second, Carleton ordered all persons who would not join in thef the garrison, the small military ability of Carleton, offered chances of victory. The first actdressed an extravagant and menacing letter to Carleton, which was sent by a woman of the country, anerwards shot into the town upon an arrow; but Carleton would hold no communication with him, and eve of parley with rebels. Montgomery knew that Carleton was sincere, and if necessary would sooner beered, that the repeated defiance would induce Carleton to come out; but he could not be provoked intthe men lay on their arms; in the upper town, Carleton and others not on duty slept in their clothesthat the other attacks were only feints, left Carleton free to concentrate all his force against the
Daniel Morgan (search for this): chapter 14
cease. At sundown of Christmas he reviewed Arnold's battalion at Morgan's quarters, and ad- Chap. LIV.} 1775 Dec. dressed them with spirity wounded in the leg by a musket ball and carried off disabled; but Morgan's men, who formed the van, rushed forward to the portholes and fired into them, while others, Charles Porterfield the first, Morgan himself the second, mounted by ladders, carried the battery, and took its captain and guard prisoners. But Morgan was at first followed only by his own company and a few Pennsylvanians. It was still very dark; he had e made to carry them. With a voice louder than the northeast gale, Morgan cheered on his riflemen; but though Heth and Porterfield and a few ants, the flower of the rebel army, was cooped up within the town. Morgan proposed that they should cut their way through their enemies; but ope was gone, at ten o'clock they surrendered. Thus Greene, Meigs, Morgan, Hendricks, the hardy men who had passed the wilderness with purpos
liding down fifteen or twenty feet. The wind, which was at east by north, blew furiously in their faces, with cutting hail, which the eye could not endure; their constant step wore the frozen snow into little lumps of ice, so that the men were fatigued by their struggles not to fall, and they could not keep their arms dry. The signal from Cape Diamond being given more than half an hour too soon, the general with his aidede-camps, Macpherson and Burr, pushed on with the front, composed of Cheesman's company and Mott's; and more than half an hour before day they arrived at the first barrier, with the guides and carpenters. The rest of the party lagged behind; and the ladders were not within half a mile. Montgomery and Cheesman were the first that entered the undefended bar- Chap. LIV.} 1775. Dec. rier, passing on between the rock and the pickets which the carpenters began to saw and wrench away. While a message was sent back to hurry up the troops, Montgomery went forward to obse
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