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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8. Search the whole document.

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Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
gh the concurrence of all the colonies could not be obtained. If none of the rest will join, said Samuel Adams to Franklin, I will endeavor to unite the New England colonies in confederating. I approve your proposal, said Franklin, and if you succeed, I will cast in my lot among you. But even in New England the actors who obeyed the living oracles of freedom wrought in darkness and in doubt; to them the formation of a new government was like passing through death to life. The town of Portsmouth in New Hampshire disavowed the intention of separating from the parent country; the convention of that colony, which was the first to frame a government of its own, remembered their comparative weakness, and modestly shrunk from giving the example of a thorough change: they retained their old forms of a house of representatives and a council; they provided no substitute for their governor who had fled, but merged the executive power in the two branches of the legislature; and they authoriz
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e same time the several colonies lavished away their treasure on special military preparations. In New Jersey the letters of the royal governor were intercepted; and their tenor was so malignant that Lord Stirling placed him under arrest. In Georgia the people were elated with their seeming security. Twelve months ago, said they, we were declared rebels, and yet we meet with no opposition; Britain may destroy our towns, but we can retire to the back country and tire her out. On the appearn his own house. The other crown officers either fled or were seized. After an imprisonment of more than three weeks, the governor escaped by night, went by land to Bonaventure, and was rowed through Tybee Creek to the Scarborough man-of-war. Georgia, said he, is now totally under the influence of the Carolina people; nothing but force can pave the way for the commissioners. When the Virginia convention, which had been in session from the first of December, heard of the burning of Norfolk
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
and engaged recruits for the war; but this measure congress refused to warrant; and it was left to the government of Massachusetts, with the aid of the rest of New England, to keep up the numbers of the army while it remained on her soil. For that but in the absence of John Adams even his colleagues, Cushing and Paine, sided with Wilson, who carried the vote of Massachusetts as a part of his majority. Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. When Cushing's constituents heard of his pusillanimous wavering, t immediate confederation; in the presence of John Adams, who had accepted for the time the office of chief justice in Massachusetts, the council in that colony would not concur with its house of representatives in soliciting instructions from the seand which promised freedom to America in point of taxation and internal police, and the restoration of the charter of Massachusetts. Lynch, a delegate of South Carolina, who had written to the north that John Adams should be watched because his int
North America (search for this): chapter 16
fish to Spain, even to exchange it for powder; the impulse for a world-wide commerce came from Virginia. On Saturday, the twentieth of January, on motion of Archibald Cary, her convention gave its opinion in favor of opening the ports of the colonies to all persons willing to trade with them, Great Britain, Ireland, and the British West Indies excepted, and instructed her delegates in the general congress to use their endeavors to have such a measure adopted, so soon as exportation from North America should be permitted. That this recommendation should have been left after ten months of war to be proposed by a provincial convention, is another evidence of the all but invincible attachment of the colonies to England. Thus the progress of the war necessarily brought to America independence in all but the name; she had her treasury, her army, the rudiments of a navy, incipient foreign relations, and a striving after free commerce with the world. She was self-existent, whether she w
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 16
age; posterity are virtually involved in it even to the end of time. But Great Britain has protected us, say some. Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. She did not protect us nor perhaps ever will be, our enemies as Americans, but as the subjects of Great Britain. Britain is the parent country, say some; then the more shame upon her chow a single advantage that this continent can reap by being connected with Great Britain. As Europe is our market for trade, we ought to form no partial connectirnal power. The most sanguine in Britain do not think so. The authority of Great Britain, sooner or later, must have an end; and the event cannot be far off. The bu continuance of the new constitution only during the unnatural contest with Great Britain, protesting that they had never sought to throw off their dependence, and tpening the ports of the colonies to all persons willing to trade with them, Great Britain, Ireland, and the British West Indies excepted, and instructed her delegate
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 16
n, and they carried the question against him. Four days later, the Quakers of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, at a meeting of their representatives in Philadelphia, published their testimony that the setting up and putting down of kings and governments is God's peculiar prerogative. Yet the votes of congress showed a fixed determination to continue the struggle; twenty seven battalions were ordered to be raised in addition to those with Washington; it was intended to send ten thousand men into Canada; Arnold, on the motion of Gadsden, was unanimously appointed a brigadier general; powder and saltpetre began to be received in large quantities, and the establishment of powder mills was successfully encouraged. The expenditures authorized for the purposes of the war for the year, were computed at ten millions of dollars; and at the same time the several colonies lavished away their treasure on special military preparations. In New Jersey the letters of the royal governor were intercepte
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
in my lot among you. But even in New England the actors who obeyed the living oracles of freedom wrought in darkness and in doubt; to them the formation of a new government was like passing through death to life. The town of Portsmouth in New Hampshire disavowed the intention of separating from the parent country; the convention of that colony, which was the first to frame a government of its own, remembered their comparative weakness, and modestly shrunk from giving the example of a thorouuring the unnatural contest with Great Britain, protesting that they had never sought to throw off their dependence, and that they would rejoice in such a conciliation as the continental congress should approve. It was not the hesitancy of New Hampshire alone Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. that defeated the plan of an immediate confederation; in the presence of John Adams, who had accepted for the time the office of chief justice in Massachusetts, the council in that colony would not concur with it
Carter Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
our towns, but we can retire to the back country and tire her out. On the appearance of a small squadron in the Savannah, Joseph Habersham, on the eighteenth of January, raised a Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. party of volunteers, took Sir Joseph Wright prisoner, and confined him under a guard in his own house. The other crown officers either fled or were seized. After an imprisonment of more than three weeks, the governor escaped by night, went by land to Bonaventure, and was rowed through Tybee Creek to the Scarborough man-of-war. Georgia, said he, is now totally under the influence of the Carolina people; nothing but force can pave the way for the commissioners. When the Virginia convention, which had been in session from the first of December, heard of the burning of Norfolk, and considered that the naval power of England held dominion over the waters of the Chesapeake, they resolved to give up its shores to waste and solitude, promising indemnity to the sufferers. The commandi
Richard Penn (search for this): chapter 16
ction for England remained paramount. till the king's proclamation declared them rebels then the new conviction demanded utterance; and as the debates in congress were secret, it had no outlet but the press. The writer who embodied in words the vague longing of the country, mixed up with some crude notions of his own, was Thomas Paine, a literary adventurer, at that time a little under forty years of age; the son of a Quaker of Norfolk in England, brought up in the faith of George Fox and Penn, the only school in England where he could have learned the principles which he was now to defend, and which it seemed a part of his nature to assert. He had been in America not much more than a year, but in that time he had cultivated the society of Franklin, Rittenhouse, Clymer, and Samuel Adams; his essay, when finished, was shown to Franklin, to Rittenhouse, to Samuel Adams, and to Rush; and Rush gave it the title of common sense. The design and end of government, it was reasoned,
George Fox (search for this): chapter 16
eir old affection for England remained paramount. till the king's proclamation declared them rebels then the new conviction demanded utterance; and as the debates in congress were secret, it had no outlet but the press. The writer who embodied in words the vague longing of the country, mixed up with some crude notions of his own, was Thomas Paine, a literary adventurer, at that time a little under forty years of age; the son of a Quaker of Norfolk in England, brought up in the faith of George Fox and Penn, the only school in England where he could have learned the principles which he was now to defend, and which it seemed a part of his nature to assert. He had been in America not much more than a year, but in that time he had cultivated the society of Franklin, Rittenhouse, Clymer, and Samuel Adams; his essay, when finished, was shown to Franklin, to Rittenhouse, to Samuel Adams, and to Rush; and Rush gave it the title of common sense. The design and end of government, it was r
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