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Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Some notes of the history of Medford from 1801 to 1851. read before the Medford Historical Sittle to disturb them. Not being a native of Medford, and not yet a centenarian, I can hardly be ee control of the lakes. In this war eighteen Medford citizens enlisted, two of whom, Edmund Gates , made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, the muster-field. Such a company existed in Medford as early as 1781. Until 1804 this company beof one hundred and ninety-six rank and file. Medford, I think, has never mustered so large a compais back. So much for the military history of Medford. The next matter of special interest in thision in November, 1825. My first visit to Medford was to my uncle, the Rev. Caleb Stetson, who nlarge a little upon the shiping interest of Medford, but looking over the programme of exercises uld like to say a few words of some of my old Medford friends who have passed away—some of whom I h[11 more...]
Hanover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
commission as captain in the army, and remained and did good service in the army as long as he lived. He was brevetted major for gallant conduct at the battle of Plattsburg, and afterwards received a commission as lieutenant-colonel. He once told me a little incident of his experience during the war. A company of sailors had been drafted for service in the fleet on the lakes, and were to march under his command from the North End of Boston to go into camp at Roxbury. They marched through Hanover and down Court streets, and on reaching Washington street he gave the order, Right wheel. Whether as sailors they did not understand the order, or the strong breeze coming up State street with its familiar smell of the sea attracted them, the order shouted out with all his strength was disregarded, and they continued to head straight for Long wharf. His old instincts as a sailor prompted him, and with a yell as from a speaking-trumpet came the order, Luff, d—n you, luff! This they unders
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
tenant-colonel. He once told me a little incident of his experience during the war. A company of sailors had been drafted for service in the fleet on the lakes, and were to march under his command from the North End of Boston to go into camp at Roxbury. They marched through Hanover and down Court streets, and on reaching Washington street he gave the order, Right wheel. Whether as sailors they did not understand the order, or the strong breeze coming up State street with its familiar smell od to head straight for Long wharf. His old instincts as a sailor prompted him, and with a yell as from a speaking-trumpet came the order, Luff, d—n you, luff! This they understood, and coming up handsomely into the wind's eye took the road for Roxbury. The incident was a source of amusement in the papers at the time, and caricatures of it were printed. Colonel Brooks, though stationed from time to time in various parts of the country with his command, made Medford his home when permitted
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
said, Happy are the people who have no history. This is only another mode of expressing the quiet happiness of the calm, contented life in which so many of our New England towns moved on, with little to record and little to disturb them. Not being a native of Medford, and not yet a centenarian, I can hardly be expected to have anvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen profession. But when the war broke out he received a commission riends who have passed away—some of whom I hope may still be kindly remembered by some of you. Let me mention Mr. P. C. Brooks, then probably the richest man in New England, Rev. Caleb Stetson, well esteemed even among those who differed most widely from his religious views, the elder E. F. Hastings, D. Hall, Captain King, father o
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
and caricatures of it were printed. Colonel Brooks, though stationed from time to time in various parts of the country with his command, made Medford his home when permitted, as long as he lived, occupying the old house of his father before mentioned, where in the old time I had many a game of whist with him. His fate was a singular one. He had always a great horror of steamboats, and would never voluntarily travel on one. But in December, 1836, he was ordered to proceed from Fort Moultrie, S. C., to Florida, to take command of his regiment in the Florida war. He embarked on the steamer Dolphin; the boilers, as he had always anticipated, blew up, and he was killed. In the early part of the century all male citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five were compelled to do military duty, unless excused by physical disability or by the holding of certain offices. They formed the militia of the State, and were usually called out three times a year: in the spring for in
Peter C. Brooks (search for this): chapter 21
ks was to Rockhill, on the land of Mr. Hastings, to see the sun set. Another, and perhaps the best, was up the banks of the canal, and through the grounds of Mr. P. C. Brooks, to the parting of the ponds —the spot where the dam of the Mystic Water Works now stands. As the canal boats came along, as they constantly did, they were s carried at great additional expense through Winter and Walnut hills and away from the centre of the town. When the road was opened, in the spring of 1835, Mr. P. C. Brooks, desirous of giving his townsmen the novelty of riding for the first time on a railroad, arranged with the managers to have the train stop one morning at Wese to say a few words of some of my old Medford friends who have passed away—some of whom I hope may still be kindly remembered by some of you. Let me mention Mr. P. C. Brooks, then probably the richest man in New England, Rev. Caleb Stetson, well esteemed even among those who differed most widely from his religious views, the elde
David Osgood (search for this): chapter 21
de of belief, and a greater liberality of thought was allowed. The stricter orthodox became uneasy, and in many of the older churches the division began. Dr. David Osgood was settled in 1774 over what was then the only church in Medford, and continued to be the pastor till his decease, in December, 1822. Undoubtedly, at the y of the church. Yet but few reasoning, thinking men can maintain to old age either the philosophical or the theological opinions they held in youth. Though Dr. Osgood never called himself a Unitarian, and never distinctly and publicly avowed a change in his belief, there can be no doubts, from many remarks dropped as if casuachurch. There is no record of the ground of the opposition, though it was undoubtedly made by Trinitarians as against Unitarians. The salary offered was $800. Dr. Osgood never received over $533.33, viz., £ 100, lawful money ($333.33), and an allowance of $200 a year for wood. At that time it was understood to be both the law
in the house in West Medford afterwards occupied by Jonathan Brooks, where Miss Lucy Ann Brooks, the last of his descendants, lately deceased. In June, 1833, before going to college, I came here and took charge for one year of the grammar school kept in the west end of the little one-story whitewashed brick school-house standing in the rear of the church and west of the horse sheds. In the other end of the building was a school for little children, taught by Miss Jane Symmes (afterwards Mrs. Hunt), whom many of you doubtless remember. The only other grammar school in town was kept by Alexander Gregg, afterwards a coal dealer, in a one-story brick building on Cross street, within the grounds of the present cemetery. Who could then have imagined the change which sixty years have made, or dreamed of the magnificent palaces in which our children now are taught? There were, a little before and for many years afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first o
E. F. Hastings (search for this): chapter 21
he business uses of the canal. When I was here as a young man—I am afraid the custom is not so faithfully kept up now—it was customary to make walking parties of young men and ladies. One of our favorite walks was to Rockhill, on the land of Mr. Hastings, to see the sun set. Another, and perhaps the best, was up the banks of the canal, and through the grounds of Mr. P. C. Brooks, to the parting of the ponds —the spot where the dam of the Mystic Water Works now stands. As the canal boats came hope may still be kindly remembered by some of you. Let me mention Mr. P. C. Brooks, then probably the richest man in New England, Rev. Caleb Stetson, well esteemed even among those who differed most widely from his religious views, the elder E. F. Hastings, D. Hall, Captain King, father of Mrs. D. C. Hall, Rev. C. Brooks and T. Cotting, with both the latter of whom I was associated many years on the school committee, and Mary and Lucy Osgood, who had a celebrity in the scholarly society of the <
but few reasoning, thinking men can maintain to old age either the philosophical or the theological opinions they held in youth. Though Dr. Osgood never called himself a Unitarian, and never distinctly and publicly avowed a change in his belief, there can be no doubts, from many remarks dropped as if casually, and various little incidents which occurred, that for the latter part of his life the assembly's catechism ceased to be held in reverence, and that he was much more in accord with Dr. Channing than with John Calvin. A little anecdote told me more than fifty years ago, by a gentleman who had means of knowing of what he spoke, indicates something of the gradual change in his opinions. He was one of the ordaining council at the settlement of Rev. B. B. Wisner over the Old South Church. He took no active part in the long examination of the candidate, but when the others had finished he said to the candidate, Young man, do you really believe in all this that you have stated? T
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