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Washburn (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ows they were town property, but the date of the digging of them is shrouded not perhaps in mystery, but in obscurity. From the well-known position he takes in regard to the location of the Cradock house, it is natural that John H. Hooper should suggest that the well in the market place was dug and used by Matthew Cradock's agents. For the convenience they were to the public the town may have kept some private pumps and wells in repair, for July 13, 1868, the committee on Pump near Washburn's Store reported the same could be repaired at small expense. Washburn's store was on the northwest corner of Salem and Park streets. It was voted the repairs be made and a cup and chain be procured also, a Bill of sale of same for Town, and it was also voted the care of the pump be in charge of Mr. Washburn. Thus has the old given place to the new order of things, and the memories of the simple past mingle pleasantly with the use of our up-to-date luxuries and conveniences. From plans
Sudbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ource being located in Clinton, Mass., in the middle of the Commonwealth, nearly fifty miles away. Several cities and towns within the prescribed circle, the radius of which is ten miles from the State House, are furnishing their own water, but at any time, any within this circle are privileged to become a part of the Metropolitan service. Swampscott, outside of this district, is supplied by a special arrangement. The Metropolitan Water District comprises three water sheds, the Nashua, Sudbury and Cochituate, drawing from an area of 212.30 square miles. The number of people supplied is close to the million mark, the latest estimate given at the office of the board being 980,900. Through open channels, and by aqueducts, water is conveyed from one reservoir to another, so the water you draw today from your faucet is a composite, a mingling of many distant springs and sources. The area of the district supplied is 171.7 square miles. The system has five great pumping stations b
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ursor of the present system of piping premises and houses, and is there then nothing new under the sun? On the south side of the river on Main street, as far as South and Swan streets, were five wells, and here were several dwelling houses, stores, offices, three blacksmiths' shops, a lumber yard, a stone cutters' yard, and at o also his grandfather, Timothy. The third well was on the premises of the Misses Hannah and Emily Tufts, who lived in a fine old house on the corner of Main and South streets, where our Central Engine House now stands. After their house was burned in the great fire of 1850, the Misses Tufts lived on Salem street, corner of Fultotel. Without doubt these two orders refer to the same well, it probably being situated as near Blanchard's Tavern as it was to Timothy Symmes' house. Beyond South street on Main street there was a well on the premises of Nathan Wait, where now stands the Police Station; one on the estate of Capt. John Sparrell, whose house i
Jamaica Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
lidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners took place, and we are now having the service of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, which seems able to provide for Boston and the towns round about for several years. As we are now a part of Greater Boston, and on account of the relation of Spot pond to the subject, it is not inappropriate to speak briefly here of Boston's former water supply. A portion of it had been supplied from Jamaica pond in West Roxbury, through four main pipes of pitch-pine logs, by the Boston Aqueduct Corporation, chartered in 1795. In 1825, three years after Boston became a city, on recommendation of the city council, a commission was appointed to ascertain the practicability of supplying the city with good water for the domestic use of the inhabitants, as well as for the extinguishing of fires and all the general purposes of comfort and cleanliness. The report was made that a good supply of pure w
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
. Hawthorne, with so prosaic a theme for a subject, by the magic grace of his pen has given us a fanciful and also truthful description of the value and uses of this necessary and homely article. Personifying the town pump of his native place, he leads it into a soliloquy in which it indulges in a few historical reminiscences and relates its own incalculable benefits to the public in a charming sketch which the author has happily called A Rill from the Town Pump. What that pump was to Salem people the one in Medford square must have been to the people here. Similar events and scenes described by one must have been realized in the existence of the other. Ours had an added dignity bestowed upon it when it was designated as the point from which the roads running east, west and south should be severally called Salem, High and Main streets. The town pump, which many of us remember from having seen it day after day without its service appealing to us, and which many of an earl
West Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Metropolitan Water Board and the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners took place, and we are now having the service of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, which seems able to provide for Boston and the towns round about for several years. As we are now a part of Greater Boston, and on account of the relation of Spot pond to the subject, it is not inappropriate to speak briefly here of Boston's former water supply. A portion of it had been supplied from Jamaica pond in West Roxbury, through four main pipes of pitch-pine logs, by the Boston Aqueduct Corporation, chartered in 1795. In 1825, three years after Boston became a city, on recommendation of the city council, a commission was appointed to ascertain the practicability of supplying the city with good water for the domestic use of the inhabitants, as well as for the extinguishing of fires and all the general purposes of comfort and cleanliness. The report was made that a good supply of pure water could be ob
Lake Winnipesaukee (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
pump be in charge of Mr. Washburn. Thus has the old given place to the new order of things, and the memories of the simple past mingle pleasantly with the use of our up-to-date luxuries and conveniences. From plans and descriptions furnished by Francis A. Wait, Fred H. C. Woolley has drawn a picture of the double pump of sixty years ago, which the former has presented to the Medford Historical Society, and so another part of the history of the past is preserved for future generations. Spot Pond. O, beautiful lake of Middlesex Fells, air as thy sister in the north Lake Winnepesaukee., Lesser ‘Smile of the Great Spirit’ art thou Spread o'er the face of Mother Earth. The red man's canoe o'er thy waters blue Was paddled for many a year, Dusky Indian maids and stalwart braves, Alone to thy borders drew near. Then the scene was changed and the white men came, Winter held thee in fetters fast; Winthrop gazed and called thee a fair Spot Pond. Fair may we keep thee to the la
Gravelly Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
as it came into Forest street. It was on the westerly side of Forest street, north of Kidder's hill, its water coming from Pine hill, the little stream called Gravelly creek. Some of these driveways were quite shallow, being used more for carriages to pass through than for watering cattle. They were located on Main street, foot of Winter hill; High street, foot of Marm Simonds' hill; another on High street near Canal street; one also at Weir bridge; a second over Gravelly creek on Salem street, near our present common; and one on Winthrop street near the estate of the late Peter C. Hall, commonly called Chardon Hall, whose dwelling-house is now the farm-house on Gen. S. C. Lawrence's estate. The streams thus utilized were Winter, Meeting-House, Whitmore brooks, in addition to Gravelly creek, before mentioned. When the increased demands of modern living made it evident that a better supply of pure water was needed in Medford than that furnished by wells and cisterns, it wa
Meeting House (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
pass through than for watering cattle. They were located on Main street, foot of Winter hill; High street, foot of Marm Simonds' hill; another on High street near Canal street; one also at Weir bridge; a second over Gravelly creek on Salem street, near our present common; and one on Winthrop street near the estate of the late Peter C. Hall, commonly called Chardon Hall, whose dwelling-house is now the farm-house on Gen. S. C. Lawrence's estate. The streams thus utilized were Winter, Meeting-House, Whitmore brooks, in addition to Gravelly creek, before mentioned. When the increased demands of modern living made it evident that a better supply of pure water was needed in Medford than that furnished by wells and cisterns, it was natural that the attention of our citizens should turn to that fine body of water partly within the limits of the town. The Spot Pond Water Company had been incorporated in 1867 by a committee from the towns of Medford, Malden and Melrose, with a view to
these private wells except that of the Misses Tufts. The fifth well was a town one with pump and trough put in at the curb. It was called the Hyde well from being in front of the estate of James Hyde, the grocer, and was commonly supposed to have been a private well. It was located near the building now numbered 56, about where a telephone pole is standing. 1 July, 1811, the selectmen voted To have a new pump placed in the Town's well on the South side of the river near the house of Timo Symmes and a good trough fixed to the same. 5 August, 1811, they voted To pass Samuel Townsend's acct. for a pump in the well opposite the Hotel. Without doubt these two orders refer to the same well, it probably being situated as near Blanchard's Tavern as it was to Timothy Symmes' house. Beyond South street on Main street there was a well on the premises of Nathan Wait, where now stands the Police Station; one on the estate of Capt. John Sparrell, whose house is still standing, n
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