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a manner that there should be no possibility of misunderstanding his position as a Union man, here or hereafter. He moved that it be printed. Agreed to. Mr. Wise inquired what had become of the question of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the Convention, and the gentleman from Doddridge (Mr. Stuart) was entitled to the floor. Mr. Wise desired to avail himself of the opportunity to correct a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in regard to his position on the question in the Convention of 1850-'51. It was charged that he was the author of the clauseVirginia alone, but to all the Commonwealth, in the Convention of 1850-'51.--He proceeded to make some slight correction in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for mak
Doddridge (search for this): article 2
e moved that it be printed. Agreed to. Mr. Wise inquired what had become of the question of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the Convention, and the gentleman from Doddridge (Mr. Stuart) was entitled to the floor. Mr. Wise desired to avail himself of the opportunity to correct a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in regard to his position on the question in the Convention of 1850-'51. It e history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summers said he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; but if there was, he desired an opportunity of presenting his views. He asked the gentleman from Franklin if he proposed to d
of taxation, which had been heretofore under consideration? The President said it was now properly before the Convention, and the gentleman from Doddridge (Mr. Stuart) was entitled to the floor. Mr. Wise desired to avail himself of the opportunity to correct a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in reaid he did not despair of the Republic then, nor did he despair of it now. Mr. Early trusted the Convention would pardon him for making a few remarks. Mr. Stuart, of Doddridge, claimed the floor. He was willing to have the vote taken now, if there was to be no more discussion of the subject; but if there was, he desiredg his views. He asked the gentleman from Franklin if he proposed to discuss the question under consideration. Mr. Early only asked for a few moments. Mr. Stuart then yielded the floor, and Mr. Early stated some facts in connection with the Convention of 1850-'51. He now acknowledged the justice of the principle conten
t a misrepresentation under which many persons now labored, in regard to his position on the question in the Convention of 1850-'51. It was charged that he was the author of the clause exempting negroes under 12 years of age from taxation, but this ted no exemption — asked none — but was forced to take it. He then gave a history of the transactions in the Convention of 1850-'51, and went on to say that if this question was to divide us now, he would advise its relinquishment, as he advised his and patriotic service which he rendered, not to Western Virginia alone, but to all the Commonwealth, in the Convention of 1850-'51.--He proceeded to make some slight correction in the history of that Convention, which Mr. Wise accepted. Mr. Summersfew moments. Mr. Stuart then yielded the floor, and Mr. Early stated some facts in connection with the Convention of 1850-'51. He now acknowledged the justice of the principle contended for, and advised the passage of the resolutions for raisi
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