hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abraham Lincoln 66 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 38 0 Browse Search
William Anderson 36 0 Browse Search
Jonathan T. Anderson 31 1 Browse Search
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
April 15th 22 22 Browse Search
Winfield Scott 20 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
C. H. Stevens 14 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 133 total hits in 33 results.

1 2 3 4
Roger A. Pryor (search for this): article 2
. All honor to the chivalric Virginian! May he live many years to wear the fadeless wreath that honor placed upon his brow on our glorious Friday. Another noble son of the Old Dominion, who rebukingly reminds her of her past glory, was appointed on Gen. Beauregard's Staff on Thursday, bore dispatches to the General in command, from Brigadier-General James Simons in command of Morris' Island, during the thickest of the fight, and in the face of a murderous fire from Fort Sumter. Col. Roger A. Pryor, the eloquent young Virginian, in the execution of that dangerous commission, passed within speaking distance of the angry and hostile fortress. Despite the fierce and concentrated fire from Fort Sumter, the rival fortification on Sullivan's Island received but slight damage. Its Merlons stood unmoved, and are this morning in as good a condition as they were before their strength was tested by the rude shocks of the shot. The Floating Battery came out of the iron storm witho
un, or attempting to divert the fire of a single battery from Sumter. Five of Major Anderson's men are slightly wounded. Jasper, the correspondent of the New York Times, who was arrested as a spy, was confined for a time, and then ordered out of the State. He was taken as far as Wilmington, N. C., and is now on his way North. A special dispatch from Charleston to the Baltimore Sun, dated Sunday evening, says: The Palmetto and Confederate flags now wave over Fort Sumter. Major Ripley, with 200 men, by order of Gen. Beauregard, took formal possession of the fort at 4 o'clock P. M. Whilst Maj. Anderson was saluting his flag, previous to retiring, an explosion occurred, killing one man and dangerously wounding four others. The Major marched out under the Stars and Stripes, the band playing Yankee Doodle. He starts to-night in the steamer Isabel for New York, receiving supplies from the fleet. In returning thanks to Gov. Pickens, for his kindness to himse
W. Hampton Gibbes (search for this): article 2
o'clock the conflict was opened by the discharge of a shell from the Howitzer Battery on James Island, under the command of Capt. Geo. S. James, who followed the riddled Palmetto banner on the bloody battle fields of Mexico. The sending of this harmful messenger to Major Anderson was followed by a deafening explosion, which was caused by the blowing up of a building that stood in front of the battery. While the white smoke was melting away into the air another shell, which Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes has the honor of having fired, pursued its noiseless way toward the hostile fortification. The honored missive described its beautiful curve through the balmy air, and falling within the hostile fortress, scattered its deadly contents in all directions. Fort Moultrie then took up the tale of death, and in a moment the guns from the redoubtable Gun Battery on Cummings' Point, from Captain McCready's Battery, from Capt. James Hamilton's Floating Battery, the Enfilade Battery, and
Beauregard (search for this): article 2
scene the sky was covered with heavy clouds, and everything wore a sombre aspect. A boat bearing dispatches to Gen. Beauregard from Morris' Island, reached the city about nine o'clock, reported that all the batteries were working admirably; ths Friday. Another noble son of the Old Dominion, who rebukingly reminds her of her past glory, was appointed on Gen. Beauregard's Staff on Thursday, bore dispatches to the General in command, from Brigadier-General James Simons in command of Mo. Governor Pickens has all day been in the residence of a gentleman which commands a view of the whole scene. General Beauregard commands in person the entire operations, and thus far they have moved with the utmost system and success. It g, says: The Palmetto and Confederate flags now wave over Fort Sumter. Major Ripley, with 200 men, by order of Gen. Beauregard, took formal possession of the fort at 4 o'clock P. M. Whilst Maj. Anderson was saluting his flag, previous to
Edmund Yates (search for this): article 2
spatch stated that the embrasures of the Floating Battery were undamaged by the shock of the shot, and though that formidable structure had been struck eleven times, the balls had not started a single bolt. Anderson had concentrated his fire upon the Floating Battery, and the Dahlgren Battery, under command of Lieutenant Hamilton. A number of shells had dropped into Fort Sumter, and one gun enbarbette had been dismounted. The following cheering tidings were brought to the city by Col. Edmund Yates, Acting Lieutenant to Dozier, of the Confederate States Navy, from Fort Johnson. Stevens' Battery and the Floating Battery are doing important service. Stevens' Battery has made considerable progress in breaching the South and Southwest walls of Fort Sumter. The Northwest wall is suffering from the well-aimed fire of the Floating Battery, whose shot have dismounted several of the guns on the parapet, and made it impossible to use the remaining ones. The Howitzer Battery connected wi
C. H. Stevens (search for this): article 2
the iron-covered battery, at Cummings' Point, like marbles thrown by a child on the back of a turtle. The upper portion of the Southwest wall of Fort Sumter shows plainly the effect of the terrible cannonade from the formidable product of Mr. C. H. Stevens' patriotism and ingenuity. A half an hour later the gladsome tidings came that Stevens' Battery was fast damaging the Southwest wall of Sumter. Henry Buist is doing gallant service with the Palmetto Guards, delighting all hearts buse of the South, has the honor of dismounting two of its parapet guns by a single shot from one of the Columbiads, which, at the time, he had the office of directing. The famous iron batteries — the one at Cummings' Point — named for Mr. C. H. Stevens, the inventor, and the celebrated Floating Battery, constructed under the direction of Capt. Hamilton, have fully vindicated the correctness of their conception. Shot after shot fell upon them and glanced harmless away, while from their fa
Yankee Doodle (search for this): article 2
He was taken as far as Wilmington, N. C., and is now on his way North. A special dispatch from Charleston to the Baltimore Sun, dated Sunday evening, says: The Palmetto and Confederate flags now wave over Fort Sumter. Major Ripley, with 200 men, by order of Gen. Beauregard, took formal possession of the fort at 4 o'clock P. M. Whilst Maj. Anderson was saluting his flag, previous to retiring, an explosion occurred, killing one man and dangerously wounding four others. The Major marched out under the Stars and Stripes, the band playing Yankee Doodle. He starts to-night in the steamer Isabel for New York, receiving supplies from the fleet. In returning thanks to Gov. Pickens, for his kindness to himself and wife, Major Anderson said that history would applaud him for the forbearance he had practiced; he was much gratified that no lives were sacrificed. He said his orders were to destroy the works, if possible, but not to take life if it could be avoided.
R. S. Parker (search for this): article 2
ot from Stevens' Iron Battery had told upon the walls of Fort Sumter. And also that Fort Moultrie had sustained no damage. About half-past 9 o'clock, Captain R. S. Parker reported from Sullivan's Island to Mount Pleasant that everything was in fine condition at Fort Moultrie, and that the soldiers had escaped unhurt. The thought that Fort Sumter will be breached in two hours. Three steam vessels of war were seen off the bar, one of them supposed to be the Harriet Lane. Capt. R. S. Parker reached the city from Fort Moultrie at half-past 2 o'clock, and makes the following report: Captain Parker visited Fort Moultrie and the Enfilading Battery Captain Parker visited Fort Moultrie and the Enfilading Battery near by, and found all well, and in high spirits. He left the Mortar Battery, Lieut. Hollinquist, at ten minutes past two. The soldiers stationed there are giving a good account of themselves. The Floating Battery had been struck 18 times, and received no material injury. The venerable Edmund Ruffin, who, as soon as it was k
every fire which the gallant Major made in his last struggles, but they looked defiance at the vessels of war, whose men, like cowards, stood outside without firing a gun, or attempting to divert the fire of a single battery from Sumter. Five of Major Anderson's men are slightly wounded. Jasper, the correspondent of the New York Times, who was arrested as a spy, was confined for a time, and then ordered out of the State. He was taken as far as Wilmington, N. C., and is now on his way North. A special dispatch from Charleston to the Baltimore Sun, dated Sunday evening, says: The Palmetto and Confederate flags now wave over Fort Sumter. Major Ripley, with 200 men, by order of Gen. Beauregard, took formal possession of the fort at 4 o'clock P. M. Whilst Maj. Anderson was saluting his flag, previous to retiring, an explosion occurred, killing one man and dangerously wounding four others. The Major marched out under the Stars and Stripes, the band playing Yank
While the white smoke was melting away into the air another shell, which Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes has the honor of having fired, pursued its noiseless way toward the hostile fortification. The honored missive described its beautiful curve through the balmy air, and falling within the hostile fortress, scattered its deadly contents in all directions. Fort Moultrie then took up the tale of death, and in a moment the guns from the redoubtable Gun Battery on Cummings' Point, from Captain McCready's Battery, from Capt. James Hamilton's Floating Battery, the Enfilade Battery, and other fortifications spit forth their wrath at the grim fortress rising so defiantly out of the sea. Major Anderson received the shot and shell in silence. And some excited lookers-on, ignorant of the character of the foe, were fluent with conjectures and predictions, that revived the hope fast dying out of their hopeful and tender hearts. But the short-lived hope was utterly extinguished when the
1 2 3 4