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Mr. Seward's fortification circular — its effect at the North--Opinions of the Press. The promulgation of the circular of Secretary Seward, recommending the Governors of the Northern States to providthe menacing attitude of England, and says: Mr. Seward's admonition to England, and other powers, for wet loan. This so experienced a public man as Mr. Secretary Seward ought to have foreseen, and to have avoided,d in the street than this one, as the circular of Mr. Seward, although ill-timed and unnecessary, contains notrs and sea-coasts." The Ledger says that as Mr. Seward has been noted during the present troubles for hirce us into collision. Boston, Oct. 17.--Secretary Seward's circular attracts no special attention, but falo, N. Y., Oct. 17.--The Express (Rep.) says:--"Mr. Seward's circular has taken the country by surprise, andlined to believe that the consequence would be as Mr. Seward suggests, pacificatory." The Courier (Democr
ed officer of the Government was silent, though Congress was in session, and certainly not indisposed liberally to entertain any recommendation from the Administration; and now, within six weeks of the next meeting of the same loyal and patriotic body, an appeal is made to the Governors of States to commence and expedite the work of fortification, when it is notorious that the majority of the Legislatures of those States, who alone can take any movements in that direction, do not meet until January, a month after Congress has assembled. Either the danger of disturbance to our present peaceful relations with foreign Powers, instead of being diminished, is really " more serious than it has been at any previous period during the course of insurrection," or that gentleman has written an untimely and injudicious circular. We have called it alarm-creating. One inevitable effect of it we judge will be, that it will disturb and depress the money market, cause a rapid decline in stocks, and
October 17th (search for this): article 5
y prudent that we should be prepared to defend ourselves under any circumstances which may happen. Being prepared to maintain our rights, there will be less liability that they will be disregarded so as to force us into collision. Boston, Oct. 17.--Secretary Seward's circular attracts no special attention, but its suggestions in favor of State action for coast defences meet with general approval. The circular had no perceptible effect on stocks or the money market to-day. Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 17.--The Express (Rep.) says:--"Mr. Seward's circular has taken the country by surprise, and will be likely to occasion much anxiety lest there may be in the secrets of the Department a knowledge of real danger. If, in response to the armaments England has sent to Canada, our frontier should bristle with guns and be put in a position for either offence or defence, we are inclined to believe that the consequence would be as Mr. Seward suggests, pacificatory." The Courier (Democr
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