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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 29, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
sit. They have been often asserted by the United States, and on one occasion they went to war in d been affirmed by the courts of these same United States as often as they have had occasion to takey enough, it commits the Government of the United States to a line of action which it always reprobhave been born British subjects, while the United States not only denied the right, but went to war question is purely a question between the United States and Great Britain. It has no basis eithersition always heretofore maintained by the United States. Perhaps he designed to drive England to urope in the capacity of envoys from the Confederate States establishes their guilt. But this, mostof war in this country, acknowledged the Confederate States as belligerents, and proclaimed her own an extradition treaty between her and the United States, that the class of criminals to be given u12, and that the assumption of them by the United States, under the present circumstances, is an in
France (France) (search for this): article 1
merican doctrine is fully set forth in Mr. Webster's famous letter to Lord Ashburton, and in Gen. Cass's protest against the ratification of the quintuple treaty. With respect to the latter, it is well known to have produced a powerful effect in France, and, backed by a pamphlet written by Gen. Cass and published in Paris, to have caused the rejection of the treaty by the French Chambers. The ground assumed both by Mr. Webster and Gen. Cass, afford no countenance to the new doctrine of Seward.ged in the slave trade. He represented so powerfully the evil uses to which the right thus sought might be perverted by a great maritime power, to the ruin of all commerce but its own, as to produce a complete resolution in the public opinion of France. The present question is purely a question between the United States and Great Britain. It has no basis either in the law of nations or the obligation of treaties. International law leaves it in litigation, and treaties are silent on the s
John Bull (search for this): article 1
here seems to be no doubt that, whatever may be the policy of the English Government, the sympathies of the English people are with the South in the present struggle. Thus much is certain, from the accounts of Yankee letter-writers in England, and from the querulous tone of the British press. It is not that Englishmen like slavery, but there is in the British mind an inherent love of fair play, which is called into active exercise by the present war. If there is another characteristic of John Bull as prominent and universal as his pluck and back-bone, it is his unvarying sympathy with the smallest man in the ring, and his intense indignation and contempt at the idea of two men setting upon one. From the heir apparent to the coal heaver there is a vein of genuine chivalry in the British stock, which renders it impossible for a true Briton even to comprehend how a people can be so lost to shame as to exult in the idea of overpowering their enemy by sheer force of numbers. To glory i
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
cannot have her active co-operation. We ought to be simply ashamed to depend on any-nation but ourselves for our deliverance from oppression, but such moral aid and comfort as the sympathies of civilized Christians afford may well inspire with new strength every patriot heart. It is the testimony of all mankind to the justice of se. It is the approving verdict of nations; who cannot be accused of partiality, but, on the contrary, have been prejudiced against us by our peculiar institutions and by the misrepresentations of them which have been scattered broadcast over Europe by our insidious foes. For ourselves, we rejoice that so far as England and the South are concerned, bygones are bygones. The trifling tax which was the pretext for Puritan revolt in 76, and all the other grievances trumped up for that occasion, never amounted to a thousandth part of the injustice, wrongs and crimes which the descendants of the rebels of New England have visited upon the rebels of the South.
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
cannot have her active co-operation. We ought to be simply ashamed to depend on any-nation but ourselves for our deliverance from oppression, but such moral aid and comfort as the sympathies of civilized Christians afford may well inspire with new strength every patriot heart. It is the testimony of all mankind to the justice of se. It is the approving verdict of nations; who cannot be accused of partiality, but, on the contrary, have been prejudiced against us by our peculiar institutions and by the misrepresentations of them which have been scattered broadcast over Europe by our insidious foes. For ourselves, we rejoice that so far as England and the South are concerned, bygones are bygones. The trifling tax which was the pretext for Puritan revolt in 76, and all the other grievances trumped up for that occasion, never amounted to a thousandth part of the injustice, wrongs and crimes which the descendants of the rebels of New England have visited upon the rebels of the South.
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
there is a vein of genuine chivalry in the British stock, which renders it impossible for a true Briton even to comprehend how a people can be so lost to shame as to exult in the idea of overpowering their enemy by sheer force of numbers. To glory in the spirit which can grapple with and conquer a more powerful foe, is the instinct of genuine chivalry and valor, but it is reserved for Black Republican warriors to reverse the sentiment, and fire national salutes over a victory like that at Port Royal, where ten to one was the odds necessary to secure their triumph. Whatever the cause, certain it is that every mail from England, every English journal, and every Yankee correspondent abroad, of a Northern press, confirm the impression that the sympathies of the English people are with the Southern Confederacy. We are not disposed to attribute this sympathy entirely to the fact that the interests of England are interwoven with our own. Nations like men are governed by interests, but
John B. Hill (search for this): article 1
The Cowhiding and cutting affair. --John B. Hill, charged with stabbing Aaron Haskins, on 7th street, last Wednesday, was acquitted by the Mayor yesterday, it having been satisfactorily proved that Haskins had struck him several blows with a cowhide before he resented it. He was, however, retained as a witness against other parties, in event that proceedings should be instituted for assault.--In the account of the affair published yesterday, it was stated that Hill had made some derogatory remarks in relation to a young lady from Manchester, which led to the difficulty. We are now informed that the charge against the sister of Haskins was made by another party, and Mr. Hill merely reported it, as it was his duty, to a superior authority in the establishment where he is employed. This explanation we deem sufficient, since we have made no statement as to the nature of the charge. The wounded man, we learn, is in a fair way to recover from his injuries. A report of his death
Aaron Haskins (search for this): article 1
The Cowhiding and cutting affair. --John B. Hill, charged with stabbing Aaron Haskins, on 7th street, last Wednesday, was acquitted by the Mayor yesterday, it having been satisfactorily proved that Haskins had struck him several blows with a cowhide before he resented it. He was, however, retained as a witness against other pHaskins had struck him several blows with a cowhide before he resented it. He was, however, retained as a witness against other parties, in event that proceedings should be instituted for assault.--In the account of the affair published yesterday, it was stated that Hill had made some derogatory remarks in relation to a young lady from Manchester, which led to the difficulty. We are now informed that the charge against the sister of Haskins was made by anotHaskins was made by another party, and Mr. Hill merely reported it, as it was his duty, to a superior authority in the establishment where he is employed. This explanation we deem sufficient, since we have made no statement as to the nature of the charge. The wounded man, we learn, is in a fair way to recover from his injuries. A report of his death wa
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
B. Hill, charged with stabbing Aaron Haskins, on 7th street, last Wednesday, was acquitted by the Mayor yesterday, it having been satisfactorily proved that Haskins had struck him several blows with a cowhide before he resented it. He was, however, retained as a witness against other parties, in event that proceedings should be instituted for assault.--In the account of the affair published yesterday, it was stated that Hill had made some derogatory remarks in relation to a young lady from Manchester, which led to the difficulty. We are now informed that the charge against the sister of Haskins was made by another party, and Mr. Hill merely reported it, as it was his duty, to a superior authority in the establishment where he is employed. This explanation we deem sufficient, since we have made no statement as to the nature of the charge. The wounded man, we learn, is in a fair way to recover from his injuries. A report of his death was in circulation last night, but we could trace
the important arrests, and was entirely successful. He was also aided by Captain Keyster, with a detachment from the third Indiana Cavalry, 100 strong. Orts in Regard to the strength of the Union army — movements of Gen. but . From the Washington telegraphic correspondence of the New York Herald we take the following items: Paragraphs are extensively published, stating that it has been officially announced that the Government has six hundred thousand volunteers in the field and in camp. No such official annunciation has been made. The act in that our forces now in the field, have been generally, through the representations of politicians for their own purpose, greatly estimated. In this way the public has been made impatient for achievements, for which the army is not ready, and enlistments are greatly retarded. General Butler made a flying visit to this yesterday, coming in the morning from Fortress Monroe, and leaving in the afternoon at the same place.
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