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Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 4
is attached to the department of General Halleck, there will be, under his direction, a combined movement of all his disposable forces from Fort Henry, Mayfield, Paducah, Smithland, and Cairo, including Commodore Porter's gun-boats, upon Columbus, in front, flank and rear, and that it will not be long before we shall have the plea, and never be heard of again. "Treachery of the rebels to one another." The New York Herald, of the 8th instant, says: By our latest reports from Paducah, it appears that General Grant and Gen. Smith were pursuing the flying rebels, to the amount of four or five thousand, on each side of the river, and it was repor of Fort Henry abandoned the fight, leaving the artillery corps alone to defend it, not having much sympathy with the cause of rebellion. Several gun- boats left Paducah yesterday for the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, and Gen. Grant was to attack. Fort Donelson to-day. It is thus evident that the blow struck at Fort Henry is
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): article 4
ical shriekers will be gratified. Pay of prisoners of War. The President has approved the joint resolution to authorize the Secretary of War to procure from such officers and enlisted men of the United States army as are now or hereafter may be held as prisoners of war in the so-called Confederate States, from time to time, their respective allotments of pay to their families or friends, upon which certified allotments the Secretary shall cause drafts to be made, payable in the city of New York or Boston, to the order of such persons to whom the allotments were or may be made, and to remit the drafts to the address of such persons as may be designated. War Department and the Telegraph. The President of the American Telegraph Company leaves Washington for New York to-morrow morning. Frequent and satisfactory interviews with the Secretary of War have convinced Mr. Sanford that the measures adopted by the Government in relation to the transmission of telegraphic dispatc
Pamlico Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
ial law would be proclaimed, and that during the disturbance cheers for the Union were given. Philadelphia, Feb. 7, 1862. --The dispatch about the reported riot at Norfolk is incorrect. It was stated that the riot occurred at Richmond, not at Norfolk. Washington items. Washington dispatches, under date of the 7th inst., say: Effect of the news of the progress of the Union forces. The news to-day of the triumphant progress of the Union arms on the Tennessee river, in Pamlico Sound, and on the Upper Potomac, has caused great rejoicing. It is regarded, however, as only the first faint muttering of the terrific storm about to burst upon the rebels from all points of the compass. The passage of the currency bill and the glorious news of the success of the Union arms are sources of congratulation in Administration circles, only equalled by the consternation and dismay of the opposition. The military operations in Tennessee. Nothing has been received at h
Bowling Green, Wood County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 4
a good position at Fort Henry from which to advance westward upon Columbus, or eastward upon Bowling Green, in the rear — the two strongholds of the rebels in Western Kentucky, and upon the maintenanwn to New Orleans. This is why Beauregard has been transferred from Manassas to Columbus or Bowling Green; for the rebels have discovered that their immediate danger is more pressing on the line of ons of Gen. McClellan, the army of Gen. Buell is steadily encircling the great rebel camp at Bowling Green. This is a strong defensive position, the village being surrounded by a circle of abrupt and batteries. We are assured, however, that the programs of General Buel, for the capture of Bowling Green is one which cannot fall. Before the expiration of the present month, therefore, with any is, we expect to hear the glorious news of the expulsion of the rebels from both Columbus and Bowling Green. A rebel army, including both places, of over a hundred and twenty thousand men, will thus
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
magine that Price and his guerillas will be left on the soil of Missouri; or that the Burnside expedition will be confined to reconnaissances of the inland waters of North Carolina; or that the powerful fleet of Dupont and the co-operating land forces of Sherman will be idle; or that our land and naval forces in Florida and on Ship Island, within convenient distance of New Orleans and Mobile. Will remain resting upon their oars; or that Gen. Wool will be limited to the daily routine of Fortress Monroe; or that our great Army of the Potomac will be continued much longer in the monotonous service of an army of observation. On the contrary, we expect that this whole immense circle of fleets and armies will very soon open in a circle of fire against this beleaguered rebellion, the echoes of which will be heard from the Mississippi overland to the Potomac, and from the Potomac to the Carolinas, and thence along the seaboard and Gulf coast to the swamps of Louisiana. Our land and nav
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 4
We congratulate our readers upon another important Union victory in the West. Our splendid Western soldiers, under Generals Grant and McClernand, who, in their first encounter with the rebels at Belmont, exhibited the fighting qualities of Napoleon's Old Guard, have marched into the occupation of the valuable strategic defences of Fort Henry on the Tennessee river. Our troops occupy a good position at Fort Henry from which to advance westward upon Columbus, or eastward upon Bowling Grtry as Northern armies advance; we shall burn villages and towns; the crops and cattle must be utterly destroyed, and invading armies must be starved into helplessness. The Russians acted well and patriotically when their empire was assailed by Napoleon's irresistible hosts; but the South, when penetrated by invading armies, will leave a history which shall be as most extravagant fiction in point of self-inflicted sufferings, when contrasted with that which details the sacrifices of the Russian
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 4
further than the dispatch received at the Navy Department and forwarded to the Herald early this afternoon. It is believed that the expedition, having effected the capture of Fort Henry, has already struck a much more important blow on the Cumberland river. Gen. Fremont and the Radicals. It is currently rumored that Gen. Fremont has been completely whitewashed by the radical majority in the Select Committee on the Conduct of the War. The clique of shriekers are loud and bold in their d that their immediate danger is more pressing on the line of the Mississippi than on the line of the Potomac. We suppose that the next thing in order by our troops at Fort Henry will be the reduction of the supporting Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland river, at Dover, some ten miles across the hills at this point from the Tennessee; and, next, that those railroads will be occupied which connect the rebels on the Mississippi with the rebels in Virginia; and that then, as all that section of Kent
Smithland, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 4
son, on the Cumberland river, at Dover, some ten miles across the hills at this point from the Tennessee; and, next, that those railroads will be occupied which connect the rebels on the Mississippi with the rebels in Virginia; and that then, as all that section of Kentucky lying between the Cumberland and the Mississippi is attached to the department of General Halleck, there will be, under his direction, a combined movement of all his disposable forces from Fort Henry, Mayfield, Paducah, Smithland, and Cairo, including Commodore Porter's gun-boats, upon Columbus, in front, flank and rear, and that it will not be long before we shall have the pleasure of announcing a crushing defeat of the rebels in that quarter. Meantime, in accordance with the instructions of Gen. McClellan, the army of Gen. Buell is steadily encircling the great rebel camp at Bowling Green. This is a strong defensive position, the village being surrounded by a circle of abrupt and commanding hills, which are
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
e rebels have discovered that their immediate danger is more pressing on the line of the Mississippi than on the line of the Potomac. We suppose that the next thing in order by our troops at Fort Henry will be the reduction of the supporting Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland river, at Dover, some ten miles across the hills at this point from the Tennessee; and, next, that those railroads will be occupied which connect the rebels on the Mississippi with the rebels in Virginia; and that then, as enry abandoned the fight, leaving the artillery corps alone to defend it, not having much sympathy with the cause of rebellion. Several gun- boats left Paducah yesterday for the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, and Gen. Grant was to attack. Fort Donelson to-day. It is thus evident that the blow struck at Fort Henry is to be vigorously followed up by our Generals.--The details which we give of this brilliant affair from various sources to-day will be found of the highest interest. The G
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
rebels from both Columbus and Bowling Green. A rebel army, including both places, of over a hundred and twenty thousand men, will thus be cut up and dispersed, Kentucky and Tennessee will be instantly liberated, and the sustaining spirit of this rebellion will be completely broken. In the interval, however, we do not imagine that Price and his guerillas will be left on the soil of Missouri; or that the Burnside expedition will be confined to reconnaissances of the inland waters of North Carolina; or that the powerful fleet of Dupont and the co-operating land forces of Sherman will be idle; or that our land and naval forces in Florida and on Ship Island, within convenient distance of New Orleans and Mobile. Will remain resting upon their oars; or that Gen. Wool will be limited to the daily routine of Fortress Monroe; or that our great Army of the Potomac will be continued much longer in the monotonous service of an army of observation. On the contrary, we expect that this whole
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