hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 154 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph R. Anderson 15 3 Browse Search
Stephen Green 15 1 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 14 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Alexander Scott 12 0 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
W. L. Yancey 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 274 total hits in 46 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 6
e Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are rising in arms to resist the military despotism which, in the name of the Constitution, has been so ruthlessly, and in such utter perversion of the provisions of that instrument, imposed upon them. The undersigned have also sufficient reasons for the belief that even in the northwestern part of the State of Illinois a part of the people have proclaimed open opposition to Mr. Lincoln's unconstitutional and despotic Government, while several other public assemblies and their Legislatures have condemned the war as subversive of the Constitution. In addition to these striking evidences of the increased strength of the Confederate States, of great internal weakness and division in Mr. Lincoln's Government, the undersigned can proudly and confidently point to the unity which exists among the people of
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
ity. The brief history of the past confirms them in this belief. Since the organization of the Government of the Confederate States in February last, and since Mr. Lincoln assumed the reins of Government in the United States, and commenced preparing his aggressive policy against the Confederate States, the moral weight of their position and cause, aided by the constitutional action and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France and Spain, to secede from the late Union and join the Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are rising in arms to resist the military despotism which, in the name of the Constitution, has been so ruthlessly, and
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 6
to justify all that they had said, with the hope that her Majesty's Government would soon come to the conclusion that the same sense of justice, the same view of duty under the law of nations, which caused it to recognize the de facto Government of Texas while yet a superior Mexican army was contending for supremacy upon its soil, the de facto Governments of the South American republics while Spain still persisted in claiming to be their sovereign, and the de facto Governments of Greece, of Belgium, and Italy, would induce it to recognize the Government of the Confederate States of American upon the happening of events exhibiting a deep seated and abiding confidence that success will attend their efforts. At all events, reconstruction of the Union is an impossibility. The brief history of the past confirms them in this belief. Since the organization of the Government of the Confederate States in February last, and since Mr. Lincoln assumed the reins of Government in the United
North America (search for this): article 6
e North American continent. W. L. Yancey, P. A. Rost, A. Dudley Mann. Earl Russell's reply. Foreign Office, Aug. 24, 1861. The undersigned has had the honor to receive the letter of the 14th inst., addressed to him by Messrs. Yancey, Rost, and Mann, on behalf of the so-styled Confederate States of North American. The British Government do not pretend in any way to pronounce a judgment upon the questions in debate between the United States and their adversaries in North America; the British Government can only regret that these differences have unfortunately been submitted to the arbitrament of arms. Her Majesty has considered this contest as constituting a civil war, and her Majesty has, by her royal proclamation, declared her intention to preserve a strict neutrality between the contending parties in that war. Her Majesty will strictly perform the duties which belong to a neutral. Her Majesty cannot undertake to determine by anticipation what may be th
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
ne of these gentlemen, speaking for the others, dilated on the causes which had induced the Southern States to secede from the Northern. The principal of these causes, he said, was not slavery, but the very high price which, for the sake of protecting the Northern manufacturers, the South were obliged to pay for the manufactured goods which they required. --One of the first acts of the Southern Congress was to reduce these duties, and, to prove their sincerity, he gave as an instance that Louisiana had given up altogether that protection on her sugar which she enjoyed by the legislation of the United States. As a proof of the riches of the South, he stated that of $350,000,000 of exports of produce to foreign countries, $270,000,000 were furnished by the Southern States. I said that I could hold no official communication with the delegates of the Southern States. That, however, when the question of recognition came to be formally discussed, there were two points upon which
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
f history of the past confirms them in this belief. Since the organization of the Government of the Confederate States in February last, and since Mr. Lincoln assumed the reins of Government in the United States, and commenced preparing his aggressive policy against the Confederate States, the moral weight of their position and cause, aided by the constitutional action and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France and Spain, to secede from the late Union and join the Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are rising in arms to resist the military despotism which, in the name of the Constitution, has been so ruthlessly, and in such utte
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 6
ainst the Confederate States, the moral weight of their position and cause, aided by the constitutional action and policy of the new President and his Cabinet, have caused four other great States, viz., Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas, containing about 4,500,000 inhabitants, and covering an extent of valuable territory equal to that of France and Spain, to secede from the late Union and join the Confederate States; while the inhabitants of three other powerful States, viz: Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, are now agitated by the throes of revolution, and a large part of them are rising in arms to resist the military despotism which, in the name of the Constitution, has been so ruthlessly, and in such utter perversion of the provisions of that instrument, imposed upon them. The undersigned have also sufficient reasons for the belief that even in the northwestern part of the State of Illinois a part of the people have proclaimed open opposition to Mr. Lincoln's uncons
P. A. Rost (search for this): article 6
t day. With a view to preserve, as history, the official record of the mission of Messrs. Yancey, Rost, and Mann, we commence with. Lord Russell's interview with the Southern Commissioners. Loreagues. My Lord: On Saturday last I received at my house Mr. Yancey, Mr, Mann, and Judge Rost, the three gentlemen deputed by the Southern Confederacy to obtain their recognition as an indConfederacy would not be long delayed, I am, &c., J. Russell The letter of Messrs. Yancey, Rost and Mann. Following the above is a letter addressed by the Commissioners to Earl Russell dateuman race, both in the Eastern as well as upon the North American continent. W. L. Yancey, P. A. Rost, A. Dudley Mann. Earl Russell's reply. Foreign Office, Aug. 24, 1861. The undeed has had the honor to receive the letter of the 14th inst., addressed to him by Messrs. Yancey, Rost, and Mann, on behalf of the so-styled Confederate States of North American. The British Gove
R. Semmes (search for this): article 6
The Niagara's Mails.the British State papers on American affairsletter from Capt. Semmes, of the Sumter. &c., &c., &c., &c., The New York papers of Feb. 26, received at this office on Friday evening last, contain full details of news by the Niagara, which had already been briefly forwarded by telegraph. We extract a portjustify them in recognizing the independence of a State which had not yet shown the power of securing and maintaining its own independence. Letter from commander Semmes to the Editor of the London News. Sir: An article in the Daily News, reviewing the rights and duties of belligerents and neutrals, has recently come unt at its date seen the Spanish proclamation. I rely upon your sense of justice to give place in your columns both to this communication and the letter. R. Semmes, Commander. Confederate States Navy. C. S. Steamer Sumter. Gibraltar, Jan. 29, 1862 The British Parliament. In the House of Lords on the 7th inst. the
Washington (search for this): article 6
right of secession with ability and dignity. It then reviews the previous efforts of the Commissioners to impress the British Government with a sense of the rights justly belonging to the Confederacy, and proceeds as follows: In the interview already alluded to as well as in one of a similar character held between your lordship and the undersigned at a later date, the undersigned were fully aware of the relation of amity existing between her Britannic Majesty's Government and that of Washington, and of the peculiar difficulties into which those relations might be thrown if her Majesty should choose to recognize the nationality of the Confederate States of America, before some decided exhibition of ability on the part of the Government of these States to maintain itself had been shown. Therefore they did not deem it advisable to urge her Majesty's Government to an immediate decision upon so grave a question, but contented themselves with a presentation of the cause of their Gover
1 2 3 4 5