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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
ts is troubling the wisest of the abolitionists in Congress. They find they have purchased an elephant. Nearly all the Western States have constitutional or legislative provisions excluding free negroes from a residence within their limits. New England is regarded as the only available refuge for the contrabands. It is proposed now to colonize them in Massachusetts, where they can be taught a variety of industrial pursuits in warm and comfortable works hops, and reduce the cost of labor to the manufacturers. These contrabands cannot remain with safety where they now are. Their permanent support by the Government is not contemplated, and the only place open for their reception is New England, although the majority of these men here scorn the idea of working for a living, and when asked to work answer that they did not come here to work, but to avoid it. Who saved the capital? The attempt of the Philadelphia press to claim for the small band of Pennsylvania troops who arr
Saint Petersburg (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
first armed regiment to enter Washington when it was beleaguered, and the District militia was the sole reliance for its protection until the blockade was broken by the advance by way of Annapolis. Nominations sent to the Senate. The Senate held a long executive session this afternoon. No confirmations were made, but a large batch of nominations was received and referred. Among them were some fifteen Brigadier Generals. Bayard Taylor was nominated for Secretary of Legation at St. Petersburg, and the committee reported favorably. The nomination was not acted upon. The official report. In reply to the Senate's resolution calling for General Mansfield's report concerning the rebel steamer Merrimac, that body has been respectfully informed it is deemed inconsistent with the public interest at present to furnish a copy of the document. The bankrupt law. An influential delegation of New York merchants is here to urge the passage of a bankrupt law. There is now
ery great. Grant, according to a Northern letter writer, had about 60,000. If Buell had as many more, the aggregate must have reached about 120,000. These howevethat the enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber thenixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee rivee the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand our army, under General Beauregard, retreated in consequence of the arrival of Buell, powerfully reinforcing the column under Grant. [See latest news.] This withdr Gen. Beauregard retires to his fortified camp, there to await the movements of Buell. But he will not await them too long, we are sure. He will not loose the adva
nt of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Nelson were in command of the advance, and it was supposed would reach Savannah on the 4th, just two days before the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand victory, look with interest to immediate military movements in the vicinity where it was won. Our gallant Generals may be forced to a little manœuvring there. They have the noble advantage, however, of an army of heroes who have been tried, who have not only fought like heroes, but who have whipped their enem
y fighting will more than probably have to take place before the enemy in that region may be considered as shaken off. His numbers there were no doubt very great. Grant, according to a Northern letter writer, had about 60,000. If Buell had as many more, the aggregate must have reached about 120,000. These however, may be in exc enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right ban prepared, came to hand, showing that our army, under General Beauregard, retreated in consequence of the arrival of Buell, powerfully reinforcing the column under Grant. [See latest news.] This withdrawal from the river and the vicinity of the gunboats, was of course a matter of necessity. We shall yet hear a good account, we be
Our army in North Mississippi. Though we have gained an immensely important victory at Shiloh, it is still a fact not to be disguised, that more heavy fighting will more than probably have to take place before the enemy in that region may be considered as shaken off. His numbers there were no doubt very great. Grant, according to a Northern letter writer, had about 60,000. If Buell had as many more, the aggregate must have reached about 120,000. These however, may be in excess. Yet Floyd reported that the enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Ne
here were no doubt very great. Grant, according to a Northern letter writer, had about 60,000. If Buell had as many more, the aggregate must have reached about 120,000. These however, may be in excess. Yet Floyd reported that the enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Nelson were in command of the advance, and it was supposed would reach Savannah on the 4th, just two days before the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand victory, lo
. Yet Floyd reported that the enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Nelson were in command of the advance, and it was supposed would reach Savannah on the 4th, just two days before the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand victory, look with interest to immediate military movements in the vicinity where it was won. Our gallant Generals may be forced to a little manœuvring there. They have the noble advantage, however, of an army of h
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
ds that will glorify the history of their country. With such men and such a cause, ultimate triumph cannot be doubted. P. S.--After writing the above, information, for which we were prepared, came to hand, showing that our army, under General Beauregard, retreated in consequence of the arrival of Buell, powerfully reinforcing the column under Grant. [See latest news.] This withdrawal from the river and the vicinity of the gunboats, was of course a matter of necessity. We shall yet hear aas of course a matter of necessity. We shall yet hear a good account, we believe, of our gallant army. Gen. Beauregard retires to his fortified camp, there to await the movements of Buell. But he will not await them too long, we are sure. He will not loose the advantages of the great victory of the 6th by any blunder, nor will he remain inactive an instant after an opportunity for another decided blow. Should the enemy attack him, however great his numbers, we have no fear of the result.
yd reported that the enemy had Donelson eighty full regiments. These were independent of Buell's line.-- from S. Louis, Cairo, Smithland and Paducah. So that to Slumber then under Grant must have been from sixty to eighty thousand. According to the Memphis Appeal, of the 3d inst., Buell was marching towards Savannah, which is on the right bank of the Tennessee river, not far from the Pittsburg landing, which is in the immediate neighborhood of the battle field at Shiloh. McCook and Nelson were in command of the advance, and it was supposed would reach Savannah on the 4th, just two days before the battle at Shiloh occurred. So that when it did occur we may suppose that Buell was very near at hand. We may, therefore, while glorying in a really grand victory, look with interest to immediate military movements in the vicinity where it was won. Our gallant Generals may be forced to a little manœuvring there. They have the noble advantage, however, of an army of heroes who h
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