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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Brussels (Belgium) (search for this): article 2
Japanese Ambassadors were to embark at Woolwich for Holland on the day that the Etna left Liverpool. The number of visitors at the Great Exhibition on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little hope of the King of Belgium's recovery. The Turks, after having taken the entrenchments at Ostrog, had advanced on Abai. The entrenchments were taken by assault after five hours fighting. All the Montenegro residing in Turkey had been recalled by their Prince. The Paris evening journals, of June 11, publish the following: Dervish Pacha has encamped at Nicksich; being short of provisions. The Prince of Montenegro and Mirko had
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
nerals Burnside and Butler did, against an excitement to a slave war, and that in his last proclamation he called to mind his special message, quoting the following resolution, adopted by large majorities by both Houses of Congress: "The United States must co-operate with that State which might adopt the gradual abolition of slavery, by giving to such State, in its judgment, such a compensation as is required for public or private inconveniences resulting from such a change of system." e Times editorially approves of mediation, and says that Europe ought not to look calmly on and do nothing in the present aspect of affairs. If the offer of mediation is delayed, the more important question — that of the recognition of the Confederate States--may have to be considered. The London News argues strongly against interference in America, and contends that England has good reasons for not wishing to see carried out the intervention policy of Napoleon, which seeks to establish an
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 2
by suppressing freedom. Military directors have seized upon all the telegraph lines which traverse America in every direction. The same censorship compels their newspapers to publish only what is favorable to the North and unfavorable to the South. And what is the reason for this? The North speaks to the whole world by the electric wires, while information from the South, when it does come, comes tardily. In fact, the journals and correspondence from the South, which reach us by way of Havana and St Thomas, are sometimes five weeks behind hand, and thus lose all interest. The North proclaims martial law with all its severities; it suppresses every independent voice; it threatens the suspected with death. In presence of such despotism the English press has not been able to remain silent. In the midst of such a struggle, between such desperate opponents, who dare say that a spontaneous or likely pacification is possible? Peace can only come from without, and the word ("
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 2
e Etna left Liverpool. The number of visitors at the Great Exhibition on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little hope of the King of Belgium's recovery. The Turks, after having taken the entrenchments at Ostrog, had advanced on Abai. The entrenchments were taken by assault after five hours fighting. All the Montenegro residing in Turkey had been recalled by their Prince. The Paris evening journals, of June 11, publish the following: Dervish Pacha has encamped at Nicksich; being short of provisions. The Prince of Montenegro and Mirko had retreated in the direction of Maratz. Commercial intelligence. The
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): article 2
t of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little hope of the King of Belgium's recovery. The Turks, after having taken the entrenchments at Ostrog, had advanced on Abai. The entrenchments were taken by assault after five hours fighting. All the Montenegro residing in Turkey had been recalled by their Prince. The Paris evening journals, of June 11, publish the following: Dervish Pacha has encamped at Nicksich; being short of provisions. The Prince of Montenegro and Mirko had retreated in the direction of Maratz. Commercial intelligence. The London Money Market.--In the London money market the funds were dull, but without mate rial variation in rates. There was considerable demand for money, and the best short paper sold at 3 per cent. Consol
ent of new cotton fields. The Times editorially approves of mediation, and says that Europe ought not to look calmly on and do nothing in the present aspect of affairs. If the offer of mediation is delayed, the more important question — that of the recognition of the Confederate States--may have to be considered. The London News argues strongly against interference in America, and contends that England has good reasons for not wishing to see carried out the intervention policy of Napoleon, which seeks to establish an empire, with slavery for its corner-stone. The London News says that from the moment European soldiers shall set foot in the States, the Government of that Republic will enter upon a new era of its existence. Its political isolation will be at an end, and it will be compelled to become and remain a great military and naval Power, which is not for the interest of England nor for the peace of the world. The article also contends that England should not assi
England. Mr. Beresford Hope writes to the London Times in favor of mediation. He claims to have felt the popular pulse in England during the course of lectures which he has been giving on America, and asserts that a great majority of the people would fain see the strife terminated by the establishment of the Southern Confederacy. Miscellaneous foreign items The Prince of Wales reached Windsor June 14, from the East. The Japanese Ambassadors were to embark at Woolwich for Holland on the day that the Etna left Liverpool. The number of visitors at the Great Exhibition on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little h
William L. Yancey (search for this): article 2
t is thus that the North speaks in the spirit of moderation and of justice. Will the South be less accessible to this spirit of conciliation and of wisdom? We do not think so, and we have a proof at hand. A man of consideration in the South, (Mr. Yancey,) a Commissioner of the Southern States, at a banquet given at Fishmonger's Hall on the 9th of November last, in London, spoke as follows: When our adversary shall have become sufficiently calm to treat us as belligerents, the aurora of prs one whit nearer the desired solution, and he asks, naturally enough, to what purpose is this waste of human life, this insane expenditure of the results of human industry? We, like the Constitutionnel, recognize in the terms proposed by Mr. Yancey the "basis of a possible arrangement," and we rejoice at the prospect of mediation founded upon that basis; but we cannot conceal from ourselves that such a mediation, to be successful, pre-supposes the surrender, on the part of the North, of t
Divine right. This mediation, a point most singularly overlooked, corresponds not only to the most vital interest to commercial Europe, but also to the most sensible minds that represent the interests of America. Let us remember that President Lincoln had pronounced himself in the same sense as, before him, Generals Burnside and Butler did, against an excitement to a slave war, and that in his last proclamation he called to mind his special message, quoting the following resolution, adopavery, by giving to such State, in its judgment, such a compensation as is required for public or private inconveniences resulting from such a change of system." Let us bring to bear upon this passage another solemn declaration made by President Lincoln in his inauguration address of the 4th of March, 1861:-- "I have no intention to interfere, directly or indirectly, in the question of slavery where it exists; I do not think that I have the right to do so legally, and I am by no means
or's departure for Fontaine-bloan, mediation was resolved upon; that simultaneous propositions should be made by England and France at Richmond and Washington, and that in case of their refusal, either by the North or the South, the two Powers will impose peace upon the belligerents by force of arms. I believe the French Government is capable of proposing this project; but I cannot for a moment suppose it will be accepted in England. Paris papers state that the approaching visit of Count Persigny to London is exclusively political, and, according to the Esprit Public, he will submit to the English Cabinet the private views of the Emperor relative to arrangements for joint mediation in America. The Paris Pays says the Patric has gone too far in its statements relative to mediation. It gives to a more wish formed by public opinion the character of a diplomatic fact. Up to the present time all is confined to manifestations of the European press in favor of pacification. The
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