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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 357 total hits in 174 results.

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Nottoway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
One hundred dollars reward. --Ran away, about the 1st of July, 1864, from J. A. Seay, to whom he was hired to work on the Danville railroad, my boy John, eighteen or twenty years old, five feet six or eight inches high, bright complexion, spare made, and very likely. I will pay the above reward for his delivery to me of confinement in jail so I can get him. R. A. A. Watson, Jennings's Ordinary Post office, Nottoway county, Virginia. se 1--12t*
For Hire, several Negro Girls, by the month or for the balance of the year; one said to be a good cook. Also, a young Negro man. Clopton & Lyne, Office, corner of Wall and Franklin streets. se 8--2t
For Hire, several Negro Girls, by the month or for the balance of the year; one said to be a good cook. Also, a young Negro man. Clopton & Lyne, Office, corner of Wall and Franklin streets. se 8--2t
ht. Each heart beats high and holy, As with measured step they go, For they stand between their firesides And the invading foe. The battle rages fiercely; Has raged since break of day; And Sherman's fatal battery, With corpses, strews the way. Cries Beauregard, with thrilling voice, As is the trumpet's call, "Forward, brave comrades, to the charge, That battery must fall!" Six Hundred gallant Georgians-- With quickened step they go; And fearlessly they follow Their leader, brave Bartow. Oh! Georgia's stainless chivalry, God speed you in the fight! Your cause is just, your arms are strong, Sweep onward in your might. The setting sun sinks slowly On the gory battle-field; And to Southern rights and valor The Northern hirelings yield. The setting sun looks sadly, Where the dead and dying lay, On the ghastly field of battle. The Six Hundred! Where are they! Five deep round Sherman's battery They lie at set of sun! But the battery is taken And the red field
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
art beats high and holy, As with measured step they go, For they stand between their firesides And the invading foe. The battle rages fiercely; Has raged since break of day; And Sherman's fatal battery, With corpses, strews the way. Cries Beauregard, with thrilling voice, As is the trumpet's call, "Forward, brave comrades, to the charge, That battery must fall!" Six Hundred gallant Georgians-- With quickened step they go; And fearlessly they follow Their leader, brave Bartow. Oh! Ge Sixty of the Six Hundred Stand round their leader now, But death's eternal shadow clouds His vainly-laureled brow. Oh! Georgia's glorious chivalry! The loved ones and the brave! Who poured their blood like water out, And died that they might save! And Beauregard, the Conqueror, Rides up and bares his head-- --Uncovered, I salute The Georgia Eighth," he said, When history shall reckon Of this day's deeds the fame, Oh! whose shall be the glory? And whose shall be the shame?
ix Hundred gallant Georgians Are ready for the fight. Each heart beats high and holy, As with measured step they go, For they stand between their firesides And the invading foe. The battle rages fiercely; Has raged since break of day; And Sherman's fatal battery, With corpses, strews the way. Cries Beauregard, with thrilling voice, As is the trumpet's call, "Forward, brave comrades, to the charge, That battery must fall!" Six Hundred gallant Georgians-- With quickened step they go;slowly On the gory battle-field; And to Southern rights and valor The Northern hirelings yield. The setting sun looks sadly, Where the dead and dying lay, On the ghastly field of battle. The Six Hundred! Where are they! Five deep round Sherman's battery They lie at set of sun! But the battery is taken And the red field is won! Sixty of the Six Hundred Stand round their leader now, But death's eternal shadow clouds His vainly-laureled brow. Oh! Georgia's glorious chivalry! Th
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ard, with thrilling voice, As is the trumpet's call, "Forward, brave comrades, to the charge, That battery must fall!" Six Hundred gallant Georgians-- With quickened step they go; And fearlessly they follow Their leader, brave Bartow. Oh! Georgia's stainless chivalry, God speed you in the fight! Your cause is just, your arms are strong, Sweep onward in your might. The setting sun sinks slowly On the gory battle-field; And to Southern rights and valor The Northern hirelings yield. hey! Five deep round Sherman's battery They lie at set of sun! But the battery is taken And the red field is won! Sixty of the Six Hundred Stand round their leader now, But death's eternal shadow clouds His vainly-laureled brow. Oh! Georgia's glorious chivalry! The loved ones and the brave! Who poured their blood like water out, And died that they might save! And Beauregard, the Conqueror, Rides up and bares his head-- --Uncovered, I salute The Georgia Eighth," he said, Wh
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
Written by a lady in Maryland. The morning sun shines gaily On proud Manassas' height. Six Hundred gallant Georgians Are ready for the fight. Each heart beats high and holy, As with measured step they go, For they stand between their firesides And the invading foe. The battle rages fiercely; Has raged since break of day; And Sherman's fatal battery, With corpses, strews the way. Cries Beauregard, with thrilling voice, As is the trumpet's call, "Forward, brave comrades, to the charge, That battery must fall!" Six Hundred gallant Georgians-- With quickened step they go; And fearlessly they follow Their leader, brave Bartow. Oh! Georgia's stainless chivalry, God speed you in the fight! Your cause is just, your arms are strong, Sweep onward in your might. The setting sun sinks slowly On the gory battle-field; And to Southern rights and valor The Northern hirelings yield. The setting sun looks sadly, Where the dead and dying lay, On the ghastly field of ba
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 1
e telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excellency, Z. B. Vance, "Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh: "I have been frequently called upon to mention the services of North Carolina soldiers in this army; but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving of admiration than in the engagement at Reams'ess distinguished for boldness and efficiency than those of the infantry. "If the men who remain in North Carolina share the spirit of those they have sent to the field, as I doubt not they do, her defence may be securely entrusted to their hands. "I am, with great respect, "Your obedient servant, "R. E. Lee, General."
The war News. General Hood, in an official dispatch on the 7th, states that the enemy still hold their works, one mile and a half beyond Jonesboro'. Sherman left in Jonesboro' such of our wounded as fell into his hands when Hardee withdrew on the night of the 1st. Our wounded report, and General Hood mentions it in his dispatch, that while in Jonesboro', Sherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. PetersbGeneral Hood mentions it in his dispatch, that while in Jonesboro', Sherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excelle
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