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Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
hout loss, and promptly advancing to his former position at the right moment. As in other sketches, the writer will aim rather to present such details and incidents as convey a clear idea of the actual occurrence, then to indulge in historical generalization. Often the least trifling of things are trifles. In October, 1863, General Meade's army was around Culpeper Court-House, with the advance at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, Georgia. General Fitz Lee thereupon sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, th
Broad Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
e right, and General Fitz Lee moving on their left, through New Baltimore. There was some fatal blunder, however, in the execution of General Lee's orders, or else some obstacle which could not be overcome. General Meade pushed on and crossed Broad Run, making with his main body for Manassas. When the Southern advance force reached Bristoe they found the main Federal army gone. A strong force, however, remained, and this was drawn up behind a long railroad embankment serving admirably as a ttempt, was nearly annihilated, the General falling among the first at the head of his troops: and, advancing against the line to his left, the enemy captured, I believe, nine pieces of artillery. After this exploit they quietly retired across Broad Run, and rejoined the main column. A worse managed affair than that fight at Bristoe did not take place during the war. Well, well, General, Lee is reported to have said to the officer who essayed to explain the occurrence, bury these poor men, an
Thoroughfare Mountain (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
e infantry having few opportunities to become engaged-and I shall ask the reader to follow Stuart and his horsemen. I think it was the morning of the ioth of October when, moving on the right of the long column of Ewell and Hill then streaming toward Madison Court-House, Stuart came on the exterior picket of the enemy-their advance force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery, being near the little village of James City. The picket on a little stream was driven in, and pushing on to Thoroughfare Mountain (not to be confounded with that near Manassas), we ran into a regiment of infantry which had hastily formed line of battle at the noise of the firing. Gordon, that gallant North Carolinian, at once became hotly engaged; but there was no time to stop long. Stuart took Young's brigade-he had but two-and, making a detour to the left, charged straight down upon the enemy's right flank. Cheers, yells, carbines crackingand the infantry broke and scattered in the mountains, dropping lar
Jeffersonton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
and the laughing Young remained master of the situation. Stuart had pushed on, meanwhile, toward Warrenton Springs, and just as the fight above described commenced, a gallant affair took place above. The enemy were attacked in the town of Jeffersonton, and after a hot fight forced back to Warrenton Springs, where the Jefferson Company again distinguished itself. The attempt was made to charge over the bridge, in face of the enemy's fire. In the middle of the structure the column suddenly y before them, and crossing his whole column Stuart pushed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet thro
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
ery. Who is that? said General Stuart, pointing to the figure, indistinct in the dusk. One of the couriers, some one replied. No! returned Stuart, halt him! Two men immediately galloped after the suspected individual, who was easily, carelessly, and quietly edging off; and he speedily returned between them. Behold! he wore under his oilcloth a blue coat!. What do you belong to? asked Stuart. The first Maine, sir, responded the other with great nonchalance. In fact, the gentleman from Maine had got mixed up with us when the column went over the barricade; and, wrapped in his oilcloth, had listened to the remarks of Stuart and his staff, until he thought he could get away. The quick eye of General Stuart, however, penetrated his disguise, and he was a prisoner. It was now night, and operations were over for the day. The retreat had been admirably managed. General Meade had carried off everything. We did not capture a wagon wheel. All was beyond Bull Run. The present wri
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
ation, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, Georgia. General Fitz Lee thereupon sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mf artillery, were rapidly driven back by the enemy; and his gun was now roaring from the high ground just below the Court-House, when the clatter of hoofs was heard upon the streets of the village. It was the gay and gallant P. M. B. Young, of Georgia, who had been left with his brigade near James City, and now came to Rosser's assistance. Young passed through the Court-House at a trot, hastened to the scene of action, and, dismounting his entire brigade, deployed them as sharpshooters, and
Fleetwood Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
member that General Fitz Lee had been left on the Lower Rapidan to repulse any assault in that direction, and the expected assault had been made. I think it was General Buford who attacked him; but the attack was unsuccessful, and as the enemy fell back Fitz Lee pressed forward on the track of the retreating column toward Brandy. We now heard the thunder of his guns upon the right as he pushed on toward the Rappahannock, and everything seemed to be concentrating in the neighbourhood of Fleetwood Hill, the scene of the sanguinary conflict of the 9th of June preceding. There the great struggle, in fact, took place-Stuart pressing the main column on their line of retreat from above, General Fitz Lee pushing as vigorously after the strong force which had fallen back from the Rappahannock. As it is not the design of the writer to attempt any battle pictures in this discursive sketch, he omits a detailed account of the hard fight which followed. It was among the heaviest of the war, and
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
he track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet through his breast. At Mr. M—‘s, near the river, young Marshall, of Fauquier, a descendant of the Chief Justice, was lying on a table, covered with a sheet-dead, with a huge, bloody hole in the centre of his pale forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The army pushed on to Warrenton, the cavalry still in advance, and on the evening of the next day Stuart rapidly advanced with his column to reconnoitre toward Catlett's Station, the scene of his great raid in August, 18
Madison (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons best known to himself, General Lee determined upon a movement through Madison, along the base of the Blue Ridge, to flank General Meade's right, cut him off from Manassas, and bring on a general engagement between the two armies. The plan was a simple one. Ewell and A. P. Hill were to move out with their corps from the works on the Rapidan, and marching up that stream, cross into Madison, leaving Fitz Lee's cavalry division to occupy their places in the abandoned works, and repulse any assault. Once across the Upper Rapidan, Ewell and Hill would move toward Madison Court-House with the rest of Stuart's cavalry on their right flank, to mask the movement; and, thence pushing on to the Rappahannock, make for Warrenton, somewhere near which point it was probable that they would strike General Meade's column on i
Bristoe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.22
these columns, as they moved across his front and rear, were converging toward Bristoe, near Manassas. The only hope of safety lay in complete concealment of his pm thereafter. Meanwhile General Lee was pressing the retiring enemy toward Bristoe; Stuart on the right, and General Fitz Lee moving on their left, through New Bking with his main body for Manassas. When the Southern advance force reached Bristoe they found the main Federal army gone. A strong force, however, remained, and Run, and rejoined the main column. A worse managed affair than that fight at Bristoe did not take place during the war. Well, well, General, Lee is reported to havin the succeeding December. Both schemes failed. From the high ground beyond Bristoe, Lee, surrounded by his generals, reconnoitered the retiring rear-guard of theucklands, the infantry failed to arrest the enemy at Auburn; were repulsed at Bristoe with the loss of several guns; and now, on the Rappahannock, was to occur that
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