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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
s entire force has been estimated by reliable Confederate authority at between six thousand and seven thousand men. It seems, however, that a disinterested, and, therefore, more reliable authority --the Comte de Paris — has estimated the numbers of the Confederate cavalry at from one-third to one-half greater than those given above. It has been well said by a recent writer, referring to the statement made by Stuart in his report that the two brigades, which did not accompany him into Pennsylvania, were strong in point of numbers: As a rule, the forces on the Southern side are made out to be so nearly non-existent, that one thinks of them as a shadowy army, like the ghostly troops which pass before the Emperor in the French picture of the Revue des Morts. When McIntosh, with his command, came upon the ground, shortly before one o'clock, for the purpose of relieving Custer, he found the latter in position, facing Gettysburg, near the junction of the Bonaughtown and Salem Church
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 36
July, General Gregg was engaged with the enemy on our extreme right, having passed across the Baltimore pike and Bonaughtown road and boldly attacked the enemy's left and rear, and in his dispatches of that date he telegraphed in the evening to Washington: My cavalry have been engaged all day on both flanks of the enemy, harassing and vigorously attacking him with great success, notwithstanding they encountered superior numbers, both cavalry and infantry. Swinton, in his Campaigns of the army o upon which no events of consequence occurred, has been included. Since this article was first published, the following letter has been received which, in justice to Mr. Bachelder, is now given in full: office of the Chief of engineers, Washington, D. C., December 10th, 1878. Colonel William Brooke-Rawle, Sir-Your letter of 13th ultimo, transmitting an account of the operations of the cavalry command of General David McM. Gregg during the battle of Gettysburg, was referred to Mr. John B.
Cox Number One Ditch (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
re drawn up near the Little house, mounted and moved forward. Several squadrons of the Third Pennsylvania and First New Jersey plunged down the hill and across Cress' Run, then dismounted and deployed at the double quick. Coming to the summit of Brinkerhoff's Ridge, the enemy's line of infantry was observed approaching also at as the Salem Church road, which connects the York and Baltimore turnpikes. About half the distance to the Salem Church road, and a mile from it, the road crosses Cress' Run, and then rises to the ridge mentioned by Stuart, and known as Cress' Ridge. A moderately thick piece of woods on the right, (as Stuart's line faced) ends at t parallel with the Salem Church road, and from a half mile to a mile nearer Gettysburg, runs from the Bonaughtown road, at the Howard house, along the valley of Cress' Run, and strikes the Baltimore pike by the bridge over White Run, less than a mile southeast of the bridge over Rock Creek, near which latter, by Powers' Hill, were
Chester, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
ight still rested on the woods on the crossroad, and the Sixth Michigan went into position along Little's Run, on the left rear of Treichel's and Rogers' squadrons, occupying the space thus opened, at the same extending to the left so as to cover the Bonaughtown road. Pennington's Battery of six guns, upon arriving on the ground, went into position on the side of the Bonaughtown road, a short distance west of the Spangler house, and about two hundred and fifty yards to the left and rear of Chester's section. Between the two Randol placed his second section, under Lieutenant Kinney, of the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery, an officer of the Reserve Artillery staff, who had volunteered to serve with the battery. By the accuracy of their firing and superior range, Randol's guns soon silenced the enemy's battery on the crest beyond Rummel's, near the cross-road, and Pennington's, some guns in position more to our left. When the ammunition of the First New Jersey and Third Pennsylv
Little's Run (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
n flank, while the left centre moved up to the line of fences, driving back the portions of Jenkins' Brigade which had occupied it. This movement caused the left of the enemy's line, held by portions of Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's brigades, dismounted, to give way also, and their position was at once taken. The left, the centre, and the right centre of our line was thus advanced, while the right still rested on the woods on the crossroad, and the Sixth Michigan went into position along Little's Run, on the left rear of Treichel's and Rogers' squadrons, occupying the space thus opened, at the same extending to the left so as to cover the Bonaughtown road. Pennington's Battery of six guns, upon arriving on the ground, went into position on the side of the Bonaughtown road, a short distance west of the Spangler house, and about two hundred and fifty yards to the left and rear of Chester's section. Between the two Randol placed his second section, under Lieutenant Kinney, of the First
Purnell (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
onfederate infantry skirmishers moved along our front, covering their main column, which proved to be a portion of Johnson's Division of Ewell's Corps, advancing to the attack of Culp's Hill. Screened by Brinkerhoff's Ridge from the position occupied by the cavalry, the enemy were not, at first, observed by the pickets, but a party of Confederate officers, making a reconnoissance to the summit of the ridge where it crosses the Bonaughtown road, disclosed their approach. The section of the Purnell Battery, in position on the road near the Howard house, planted two shells in their midst. At the same moment, those portions of McIntosh's Brigade which were not unsaddled, and which were drawn up near the Little house, mounted and moved forward. Several squadrons of the Third Pennsylvania and First New Jersey plunged down the hill and across Cress' Run, then dismounted and deployed at the double quick. Coming to the summit of Brinkerhoff's Ridge, the enemy's line of infantry was observ
Aldie (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
tment, for some reason, has hitherto refused to the public. There has existed a wide-spread supposition that Stuart and his cavalry were not even present at the battle of Gettysburg. This is partly owing to the fact that, after the battles of Aldie and Upperville, Stuart became separated from Lee's army, and was prevented from joining it, or from being of any assistance to its commander during its movements preceding the battle, by the interposition of Gregg's and Kilpatrick's Cavalry. Stus battle-flag floated in the van of the brigade. The orders of the Confederate officers could be heard by those in the woods on their left: Keep to your sabres, men, keep to your sabres! for the lessons they had learned at Brandy Station and at Aldie had been severe. There the cry had been: Put up your sabres! Draw your pistols and fight like gentlemen! But the sabre was never a favorite weapon with the Confederate cavalry, and now, in spite of the lessons of the past, the warnings of the
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
he 2d of July. This section, in the hurrying movements of concentration, had become separated from its proper command, and had been found, some days before, wandering around the country entirely on its own account. General Gregg took it along with him, and showed it some marching which astonished its fat and sleek horses and well-conditioned men. The Second Brigade of the division, under Colonel Pennock Huey, of the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, had, on the 1st of July, been sent to Westminster, Maryland, to guard the army trains. Since crossing the Potomac on the 27th of June, the column had marched steadily day and night. Previously, it had been on incessant duty since the opening of the campaign on the 9th of June at Brandy Station, and now, having been for many days without food or forage, the division arrived with wearied men and jaded horses upon the field of Gettysburg. Its numerical strength had, moreover, been considerably reduced, for many horses and men had dropped f
Upperville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 36
blic until the recent appearance of Major Carpenter's able article, containing extracts from the official report of the Confederate General Stuart, which is of infinite importance to the true history of the battle, but which the War Department, for some reason, has hitherto refused to the public. There has existed a wide-spread supposition that Stuart and his cavalry were not even present at the battle of Gettysburg. This is partly owing to the fact that, after the battles of Aldie and Upperville, Stuart became separated from Lee's army, and was prevented from joining it, or from being of any assistance to its commander during its movements preceding the battle, by the interposition of Gregg's and Kilpatrick's Cavalry. Stuart was thereby compelled to make a wide detour, only reaching Lee on the 2d of July; and, owing to this separation, and the loss of the eyes and ears of his army, Lee had, to a great extent, to move in the dark. To the fact of Stuart's absence from Lee's army,
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 36
The right flank at Gettysburg. Colonel William Brooke-Rawle. It is but natural that the battle which proved to be the turning point of the Rebellion should attract more attention, and be more thoroughly studied, than any other. To some, it may seem eating to reconciliate in the day to discuss a new phase of that fearful struggle; but to those still living who there assisted, the whole subject is one of interest. The History of the civil War in America, by the Comte de Paris, has been written to the end of the year 1862, with a degree of ability which is remarkable. In his search for the truth concerning the campaign of Gettysburg, for his forthcoming volume, that author has loosened an avalanche of newspaper and manuscript communications, especially from our friends on the other side, and he may well hesitate before attempting to reconcile the many disputed questions which have arisen. So peculiar do the views of some writers appear to us, that we begin to distrust the mem
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