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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ion, and declared that it was not like a Christian to murmur at any toil for his Redeemer. Learning that Pope was advancing toward the Rapid Ann River in great force, he called upon General Lee for reinforcements; and the division of General A. P. Hill was sent to join him. This fine body of troops continued henceforth to be a part of his-corps. On the 2nd of August, the Federal cavalry occupied the village at Orange Court House, when Colonel William E. Jones, the comrade of Jackson at West Point, commanding the 7th Virginia cavalry, attacked them in front and flank while crowded into the narrow street, and repulsed them with loss. They, however, speedily perceiving the scanty numbers of their assailants, returned to the charge; and threatening to envelop Jones, forced him back in turn. But he retired skirmishing with so much stubbornness, that they pursued him a very short distance, when they withdrew across the river. This affair occurred ten miles north of Gordonsville. Pop
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of his profession. His loss has been severely felt, Succeeding General Richard Garnett in the command of the Stonewall Brigade, after the battle of Kernstown, and coming to it wholly a stranger, he had unavoidably inherited some of the odium of that popular officer's removal. During the first two months of his connexion with it, he was respected and obeyed; for his dignity, bearing, and soldierly qualities were such as to ensure this everywhere; but he inspired no enthusiasm. It was at Winchester, when General Jackson assigned him the command of his left wing, that his prowess broke forth to the apprehension of his men, like the sun bursting through clouds. The heroism with which he shared their dangers, and the mastery with which he directed their strength, placed him thenceforth in their hearts. At five o'clock in the afternoon, the struggle began in earnest, by the advance of the Federal infantry against Early, through the Indian corn. This General, handling his regiments
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: Cedar Run. While the army lay near Westover, resting from its toils, General Jackson called his friend, the Honorable Mr. Boteler, to his tent, to communicate his views of the future conduct of the war, and to beg that on his next visit to Richmond, he would impress them upon the Government. He said that it was manifest by every sign, that McClellan's was a thoroughly beaten army, and was no longer capable of anything, until it was reorganized and reinforced. There was danger,d toward Gordonsville, to meet this doughty warrior, who, as he left Alexandria to assume command of his army at Manassa's Junction, celebrated the triumphs to be achieved, before they were won, with banners and laurels. The corps returned from Westover to the neigborhood of Richmond, the 10th of July. There they remained until the 17th, preparing for their march; and it was during this respite that General Jackson first made his appearance openly, in the city which he had done so much to deli
Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
om his duress. The former was directed to seize Gordonsville, the point at which the Orange and Central Railrcuted as spies. Jackson was now moved toward Gordonsville, to meet this doughty warrior, who, as he left Ato his tent. On the 19th of July, he reached Gordonsville with his corps, and took quarters in the hospitain conversation. After a few days spent near Gordonsville, he retired southward a few miles into the countriver. This affair occurred ten miles north of Gordonsville. Pope's infantry paused in the county of Culpeps little army; and there Was reason to fear that Gordonsville would be lost, the railroad occupied, and a disa a defensive army guarding the communications at Gordonsville, and the centre of Virginia; for the commanding , and returned unmolested to the neighborhood of Gordonsville, hoping that Pope's evil star might tempt him toapid Ann, and penetrated with it twelve miles of Gordonsville. The troops which came to gspport Jackson did n
Rapidan (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e for his jaded animals. Here he devoted himself to reorganizing his command, and recruiting his artillery horses, for the approaching service. It was at this time that he complained, in his letters to his wife, of being overbur, thened with cares and labors: blut he chided himself by referring to the Apostle of the Gentiles, who gloried in tribulation, and declared that it was not like a Christian to murmur at any toil for his Redeemer. Learning that Pope was advancing toward the Rapid Ann River in great force, he called upon General Lee for reinforcements; and the division of General A. P. Hill was sent to join him. This fine body of troops continued henceforth to be a part of his-corps. On the 2nd of August, the Federal cavalry occupied the village at Orange Court House, when Colonel William E. Jones, the comrade of Jackson at West Point, commanding the 7th Virginia cavalry, attacked them in front and flank while crowded into the narrow street, and repulsed them with loss. T
Liberty Mills (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ng whether he knew when a battle was about to occur. Oh, yes, Sir, he replied: The General is a great man for praying; night and morning-all times. But when I see him get up several times in the night besides, to go off and pray, then I know there is going to be something to pay; and I go straight and pack his haversack, because I know he will call for it in the morning. August 8th, the division of Ewell, which led the way, bearing off to the northwest, crossed the Rapid Ann at the Liberty Mills, as though to attack the extreme right of Pope. Tho other divisions crossed at Barnett's Ford, below; and Ewell, turning to the east, returned to their line of march, and bore toward Slaughter's Mountain. The division of A. P. Hill, delayed by the trains which followed the preceding troops, and by a misconception of orders, did not cross the river until the morning of the 91;h. This derangement of the march arrested General Jackson many miles from Culpepper Court House, and he reluctan
Louisa (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
new, the danger of robbing God of the glory due for our success. Although he was incapable of making an ostentatious display of himself, and would never permit the interruption of business by society, yet when time sufficed for social enjoyments, he was easily approached by all who sought to know him, and was careful to contribute to their entertainment by bearing a modest part in conversation. After a few days spent near Gordonsville, he retired southward a few miles into the county of Louisa, whose fertile fields offered abundant pasturage for his jaded animals. Here he devoted himself to reorganizing his command, and recruiting his artillery horses, for the approaching service. It was at this time that he complained, in his letters to his wife, of being overbur, thened with cares and labors: blut he chided himself by referring to the Apostle of the Gentiles, who gloried in tribulation, and declared that it was not like a Christian to murmur at any toil for his Redeemer.
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
redericksburg, two marches below. This was an opportunity which the enterprise and sagacity of Jackson were certain to seize. He knew that the army of Lee, still detained to watch McClellan upon thther dispositions could be made for resisting him. Another powerful reason dictated an attack. Jackson's soldierly eye had shown him that the line of the Rapid Ann was the proper one to be held by aflank a crushing fire from superior ground. These dispositions at once decided the security of Jackson's right wing for the whole day. He placed no troops in the meadows next the mountain-base; for and of Taliaferro blazed, until it fled to the rear, utterly scattered and dissipated. And now Jackson's blood was up; and he delivered blow after blow from his insulted left wing, with stunning rapem far to the left. These fresh troops, with the remainder of the first and second brigades of Jackson's division were ordered by him to advance across the feld, throwing their left continually forw
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
smile with which Jackson would hear these shallow threats of his antagonist, and the silence with which he accepted them as auguries of a certain victory. General Pope's method of dealing with the people of Virginia was to be as novel as his strategy. He deliberately announced his purpose to subsist his troops on the country, and authorized an indiscriminate plunder of the inhabitants. His army was let loose upon them, and proceeded like a horde of brigands, through the rich counties of Fauquier and Culpepper, stripping the people of food, live stock, horses, and poultry, and wantonly destroying what they could not use. Their General also ordained, that all the citizens within his lines must perjure themselves by taking an oath of allegiance to Lincoln, or be banished South; to return no more, under the penalty of being executed as spies. Jackson was now moved toward Gordonsville, to meet this doughty warrior, who, as he left Alexandria to assume command of his army at Manassa'
A. R. Boteler (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: Cedar Run. While the army lay near Westover, resting from its toils, General Jackson called his friend, the Honorable Mr. Boteler, to his tent, to communicate his views of the future conduct of the war, and to beg that on his next visit to Richmond, he would impress them upon the Government. He said that it was ma not to lead, in this glorious enterprise: he was willing to follow anybody; General-Lee, or the gallant Ewell. Why do you not at once urge these things, asked Mr. Boteler, upon General Lee himself? I have done so; replied Jackson. And what, asked Mr. Boteler, does he say to them? General Jackson answered: He says nothing. ButMr. Boteler, does he say to them? General Jackson answered: He says nothing. But he added; Do not understand that I complain of this silence; it is proper that General Lee should observe it: He is a sagacious and prudent man; he feels that he bears a fearful responsibility: He is right in declining a hasty expression of his purposes, to a subordinate like me. The advice of Jackson was laid before the Presiden
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