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Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
emmes what iron-clads might have done Treasury and Navy the Merrimac Virginia fight in Hampton Roads the white-flag Violation those wonderful wooden shells other flashing achievements compaem adopted. Then, indeed, it would be hard to overestimate her value; damage to shipping in Hampton Roads; or her ultimate effect upon McClellan's campaign. No appropriation for an object of vit grand old captain took his place, and all was ready for the trial. During all this time Hampton Roads had been gay with Federal shipping. Frigates, gunboats, transports and supply ships ran defralyze-soon gathered force in its intervals of enforced inaction. Just after the triumph of Hampton Roads was, perhaps, the brightest hour for the navy in public estimation. People then began to wa they offered their swords; through the unequal contest of the Sounds, the victorious one of Hampton Roads; pining for the sea in musty offices, or drilling green conscripts in sand batteries; marchi
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 31
rleans the Tatnall Virginia Court-martial who did more than they? Measured by the popular test, success, the Confederate States Navy would, perhaps, be accorded little merit. Even cursory examination into the vast difficulties and discouragemy Bill was passed by Congress, a law was also made securing to resigned naval officers the same rank they held in the United States service. But there was scarcely a keel in Confederate waters, and small indeed was the prospect for the future; so tput into saucy and swift wasps like the Sumter, their stings must have driven northern commerce from the sea; and the United States ports would have been more effectually blockaded, from a thousand miles at sea, than were those of the southern fleetng attack on the Underwriter, during Pickett's movement on Newberne, would alone give him undying reputation. The United States had a navy in her waters that would class as the third maritime power of the world; and this she rapidly increased b
) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
vy. This is the general title of privateer, given to all vessels not cooped up in southern harbors. Regularly-commissioned cruisers, like the Alabama and Florida, the property of the Navy Department, and commanded by its regularly-commissioned officers, were no more privateers than were the Minnesota, or Kearsage. There was a law passed, regulating the issue of letters of marque; and from time to time much was heard of these in the South. But after the first spirt of the saucy little Jeff Davis, not more than two or three ever found their way to sea; and even these accomplished nothing. At one time, a company with heavy capital was gotten up in Richmond, for the promotion of such enterprises; but it was looked upon as a job and was little successful in any sense. So, with all the ports of the world open to belligerent ships; with unsurpassed sailors panting for the very lack of element in musty offices, privateers did not increase in number; and one of the most effective
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
e done Treasury and Navy the Merrimac Virginia fight in Hampton Roads the white-flag Violation those wonderful wooden shells other flashing achievements comparison of the two navies doubtful torpedo results Summing up the hue-and-cry Nashville and New Orleans the Tatnall Virginia Court-martial who did more than they? Measured by the popular test, success, the Confederate States Navy would, perhaps, be accorded little merit. Even cursory examination into the vast difficulties kes the meat it feeds on; and the secretary soon became the target for shafts of pitiable malice, or of unreflecting ridicule. When the enemy's gunboats-built at secure points and fitted out without stint of cost, labor or material-ascended to Nashville, a howl was raised that the Navy Department should have had the water defenses ready. True, Congress had appropriated half a million for the defenses of the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers; but the censorious public forgot that the money had b
Jamestown (Virginia) (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
d in the channel at Newport News, blockading the mouth of James river and cutting off communication from Norfolk. The Congress frigate was lying near her, off the News; while the Minnesota lay below, under the guns of Fortress Monroe. The Ericsson Monitor — the first of her class, and equally an experiment as her rebel rival-had come round a few days before to watch the Virginia, as the new iron-clad was now rechristened. The great ship being ready, Flag-Officer Buchanan ordered the Jamestown, Captain Barney, and the Yorktown, Captain Tucker, down from Richmond; while he went out with the Raleigh and Beaufort --two of the smallest class of gunboats, saved by Captain Lynch from Roanoke Island. This combined force-four of the vessels being frail wooden shells, formerly used as river passenger boats-carried only twenty-seven guns. But Buchanan steamed boldly out, on the morning of the 8th of March, to attack an enemy carrying quite two hundred and twenty of the heaviest guns in
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
of the Merrimac, there were in the course of construction at New Orleans, two mailed vessels of a different class-one of them only a towboat covered with railroad iron. There were also two small ones on the stocks at Charleston, and another at Savannah. The great difficulty of procuring proper iron; of rolling it when obtained; and the mismanagement of transportation, even when the plates were ready-made the progress of all these boats very slow. Practicality would have concentrated the wholover 1,300 vessels. To meet this formidable preparation, the Confederate Navy Department in May, 1861, had one gulf steamer in commission; had the fragments of the Norfolk Navy Yard; the refuse of the harbor boats of Charleston, New Orleans, Savannah and Mobile to select from; and had, besides, the neglect of Congress and the jealousy of the other branch of the service. Spite of all these drawbacks, the rare powers of the navy officers forced themselves into notice and use. Before th
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
s, transports and supply ships ran defiantly up and down; laughing at the futile efforts of the point batteries to annoy them, and indulging in a dream of security that was to be most rudely broken. The Susquehanna frigate, with heaviest armament in the Federal navy, laid in the channel at Newport News, blockading the mouth of James river and cutting off communication from Norfolk. The Congress frigate was lying near her, off the News; while the Minnesota lay below, under the guns of Fortress Monroe. The Ericsson Monitor — the first of her class, and equally an experiment as her rebel rival-had come round a few days before to watch the Virginia, as the new iron-clad was now rechristened. The great ship being ready, Flag-Officer Buchanan ordered the Jamestown, Captain Barney, and the Yorktown, Captain Tucker, down from Richmond; while he went out with the Raleigh and Beaufort --two of the smallest class of gunboats, saved by Captain Lynch from Roanoke Island. This combined for
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
e was visited upon Mr. Mallory's head. Public censure always makes the meat it feeds on; and the secretary soon became the target for shafts of pitiable malice, or of unreflecting ridicule. When the enemy's gunboats-built at secure points and fitted out without stint of cost, labor or material-ascended to Nashville, a howl was raised that the Navy Department should have had the water defenses ready. True, Congress had appropriated half a million for the defenses of the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers; but the censorious public forgot that the money had been voted too late. Even then it was quite notorious, that in the red-tape system of requisition and delay that hedged the Treasury — an appropriation and the money it named were totally diverse things. When New Orleans fell, curses loud and deep went up against the Navy Department. Doubtless there was some want of energy in pushing the iron-clads there; but again in this case the money was voted very late; and even Confederat
Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
upon the Beaufort, and she was compelled to withdraw. Lieutenant Robert Minor was then sent in a boat from the Virginia to fire the frigate; but was badly wounded by a Minie-ball, from under the white flag; and Captain Buchanan was seriously hit in the leg by the same volley. Then it was determined to burn the Congress with hot shot. There is no room for comment here; and no denial of these facts has ever been made, or attempted. Meanwhile, the frigates Minnesota, St. Lawrence and Roanoke had advanced and opened fire on the Virginia; but upon her approach to meet it, they retired under the guns of the fort; the Minnesota badly damaged by the heavy fire of her antagonist, while temporarily aground. Next day the Virginia had a protracted but indecisive fight with the Monitor; the latter's lightness preventing her being run down and both vessels seeming equally impenetrable. Later in the day the victorious ship steamed back to Norfolk, amid the wildest enthusiasm of its pe
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 31
cy of a subordinate was visited upon Mr. Mallory's head. Public censure always makes the meat it feeds on; and the secretary soon became the target for shafts of pitiable malice, or of unreflecting ridicule. When the enemy's gunboats-built at secure points and fitted out without stint of cost, labor or material-ascended to Nashville, a howl was raised that the Navy Department should have had the water defenses ready. True, Congress had appropriated half a million for the defenses of the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers; but the censorious public forgot that the money had been voted too late. Even then it was quite notorious, that in the red-tape system of requisition and delay that hedged the Treasury — an appropriation and the money it named were totally diverse things. When New Orleans fell, curses loud and deep went up against the Navy Department. Doubtless there was some want of energy in pushing the iron-clads there; but again in this case the money was voted very late; a
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