hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
R. E. Lee 809 13 Browse Search
United States (United States) 780 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 562 2 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 448 0 Browse Search
Grant 434 30 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 410 4 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 402 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 390 2 Browse Search
Custis Lee 390 6 Browse Search
J. H. Winder 352 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. Search the whole document.

Found 377 total hits in 151 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
-also Gen. Wise's. To-morrow we shall know more; but no uneasiness is felt as to the result. In a few hours we can muster men enough to defend the city against 25,000. A letter from Gen. Whiting suggests that martial law be proclaimed in North Carolina, as a Judge Pearson--a traitor, he thinks — is discharging men who have in conscripts as substitutes, on the ground that the act of Congress is unconstitutional. The President suggest a General Order, etc., complying with Gen. W.'s request. e was just, and ought to be executed. The President then indorsed: Drop him.-J. D. March 15 A clear, cool morning; but rained in the evening. By the correspondence of the department, I saw to-day that 35,000 bushels of corn left North Carolina nearly a week ago for Lee's army, and about the same time 400,000 pounds of bacon was in readiness to be shipped from Augusta, Ga. At short rations, that would furnish bread and meat for the army several weeks. We hear nothing additional
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
chine, and four heads of cabbage-so that we shall have subsistence for several days. My income, including Custis's, is not less, now, than $600 per month, or $7200 per annum; but we are still poor, with flour at $300 per barrel; meal, $50 per bushel; and even fresh fish at $5 per pound. A market-woman asked $5 to-day for a half pint of snap beans, to plant! March 13 A lovely spring day-bright, warm, and calm. There is nothing new, only the burning of houses, mills, etc. on the York River by the Yankees, and that is nothing new. Subsequently the day became very windy, but not cold. The roads will be dry again, and military operations will be resumed. The campaign will be an early one in Virginia, probably. Our people are impatient to meet the foe, for they are weary of the war. Blood will flow in torrents, unless the invaders avoid great battles; and in that event our armies may assume the offensive. It is now thought that the Department Battalion will be kept he
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
s here, and the President is about to appoint some of his friends brigadiers, which is conciliatory. Gen. Longstreet has written a letter to the President, which I have not seen. The President sent it to the Secretary to-day, marked confidential. It must relate either to subsistence or to important movements in meditation. If the latter, we shall soon know it. March 25 Raining moderately. Yesterday Mr. Miles, member of Congress from South Carolina, received a dispatch from Charleston, signed by many of the leading citizens, protesting against the removal of 52 companies of cavalry from that department to Virginia. They say so few will be left that the railroads, plantations, and even the City of Charleston will be exposed to the easy capture of the enemy; and this is approved and signed by T. Jordan, Chief of Staff. It was given to the Secretary of War, who sent it to Gen. Bragg, assuring him that the citizens signing it were the most influential in the State, etc.
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
d from Augusta, Ga. At short rations, that would furnish bread and meat for the army several weeks. We hear nothing additional from the enemy on the Peninsula. I doubt whether they mean fight. We are buoyed again with rumors of an intention on the part of France to recognize us. So mote it be! We are preparing, however, to strike hard blows single-handed and unaided, if it must be. March 16 There was ice last night. Cold all day. Gen. Maury writes that no immediate attack on Mobile need be apprehended now. He goes next to Savannah to look after the defenses of that city. The Examiner to-day publishes Gen. Jos. E. Johnston's report of his operations in Mississippi last summer. He says the disaster at Vicksburg was owing to Gen. Pemberton's disobedience of orders. He was ordered to concentrate his army and give battle before the place was invested, and under no circumstances to allow himself to be besieged, which must of course result in disaster. He says, also, t
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
. March 11 Rained all night — a calm, warm rain. Calm and warm to-day, with light fog, but no rain. It is now supposed the clerks (who saved the city) will be kept here to defend it. March 12 It cleared away yesterday evening, and this morning, after the dispersion of a fog, the sun shone out in great glory, and the day was bright, calm, and pleasant. The trees begin to exhibit buds, and the grass is quite green. My wife received a letter to-day from Mrs. Marling, Raleigh, N. C., containing some collard seed, which was immediately sown in a bed already prepared. And a friend sent us some fresh pork spare ribs and chine, and four heads of cabbage-so that we shall have subsistence for several days. My income, including Custis's, is not less, now, than $600 per month, or $7200 per annum; but we are still poor, with flour at $300 per barrel; meal, $50 per bushel; and even fresh fish at $5 per pound. A market-woman asked $5 to-day for a half pint of snap beans, to
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 37
of injury done him by the enemy. Mr. Benjamin and Assistant Secretary Campbell are already allowing men to pass to the United States, and even directly to Washington. Surely the injury done us by information thus conveyed to the enemy hitherto, ought to be a sufficient warning. Gen. Bragg has resolved to keep a body of 1ief must soon come from some quarter, else many in this community will famish. But they prefer death to submission to the terms offered by the Abolitionists at Washington. The government must provide for the destitute, and array every one capable of bearing arms in the field. March 14 Bright, pleasant day. The city is fullfrom Gen. Pickett, with information that thirteen of the enemy's transports passed Yorktown yesterday with troops from Norfolk, the Eastern Shore of Virginia, Washington City, etc.-such was the report of the signal corps. They also reported that Gen. Meade would order a general advance, to check Gen. Lee. What all this means I kno
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
enemy have disappeared. On the 17th inst., Gen. Lee wrote the Secretary of War that he had received a letter from Gen. Longstreet, asking that Pickett's Division be in readiness to join him; also that a brigade of Gen. Buckner's Division, at Dalton, be sent him at once. He says the force immediately in front of him consists of the 4th, 11th, 9th, and 23d corps, besides a large body of cavalry from Middle Tennessee. Gen. Lee says the railroad from Chattanooga to Knoxville, being about compy has arrived during the last two days. March 17 Bright, clear, and pleasant; frosty in the morning. Letters from Lieut.-Gen. Hood to the President, Gen Bragg, and the Secretary of War, give a cheering account of Gen. Johnston's army at Dalton. The men are well fed and well clothed. They are in high spirits, and eager for the fray. The number is 40,000. Gen. H. urges, most eloquently, the junction of Polk's and Loring's troops with these, making some 60,000,--Grant having 50,000,--a
Americus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ering turnips, cabbages, parsnips, carrots, etc., at outrageous prices. However, the superabundant paper money is beginning to flow into the Treasury, and that reflex of the financial tide may produce salutary results a few weeks hence. March 10 Raining fast all day. There was a rumor to-day that the enemy were approaching again, but the Secretary knew nothing of it. Major Griswold is at variance with Gen. Winder, who has relieved him as Provost Marshal, and ordered him to Americus, Ga., to be second in command of the prisons, and assigned Major Carrington to duty as Provost Marshal here. Major Griswold makes a pathetic appeal to the President to be allowed to stay here in his old office. The following, from the Dispatch, differs from the Examiner's account of the disposal of Col. Dahlgren's body: Col. Dahlgren's body. On Sunday afternoon last, the body of Col. Ulric Dahlgren, one of the leaders of the late Yankee raid on this city, and on whose body the
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
be! We are preparing, however, to strike hard blows single-handed and unaided, if it must be. March 16 There was ice last night. Cold all day. Gen. Maury writes that no immediate attack on Mobile need be apprehended now. He goes next to Savannah to look after the defenses of that city. The Examiner to-day publishes Gen. Jos. E. Johnston's report of his operations in Mississippi last summer. He says the disaster at Vicksburg was owing to Gen. Pemberton's disobedience of orders. He n. Lee. It is said that Gen. Longstreet is marching with expedition down the Valley of the Shenandoah, to flank Meade or Grant. I doubt it. But the campaign will commence as soon as the weather will permit. A letter from G. B. Lamar, Savannah, Ga., informs the Secretary that he (L.) has command of five steamers, and that he can easily make arrangements with the (Federal) commandant of Fort Pulaski to permit them to pass and repass. His proposition to the government is to bring in muni
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 37
ve mood, and some remark about recognition caused him to say twice-We have no friends abroad! March 22 Cloudy morning, with ice; subsequently a snowstorm all day long. No war news. But meat and grain are coming freely from the South. This gives rise to a rumor that Lee will fall back, and that the capital will be besieged; all without any foundation. A Mrs.--from Maryland, whose only son is in a Federal prison, writes the President (she is in this city) that she desires to go to Canada on some secret enterprise. The President favors her purpose in an indorsement. On this the Secretary indorses a purpose to facilitate her design, and suggests that she be paid $1000 in gold from the secret service fund. She is a Roman Catholic, and intimates that the bishops, priests, and nuns will aid her. March 23 Snow fell all night, and was eight or ten inches deep this morning; but it was a bright morning, and glorious sunshine all day,--the anniversary of the birth of Shakspea
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...