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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
, fixed his plane table and seated himself to make a map of the Confederate works. A non-commissioned officer, without orders, adjusted his gun, carefully aimed it, and fired. At the report of the gun all eyes were turned to see the occasion of it, and then to observe the object, when the shell was seen to explode as if in the hands of the officer. It had been dropped squarely upon the drawing-table, and Lieutenant Wagner was mortally wounded. Of this shot, Captain A. B. More, of Richmond, Virginia, wrote, under date of June 16, 1886,-- The Howitzers have always been proud of that shot, and, thinking it would interest you, I write to say that it was fired by Corporal Holzburton, of the Second Company, Richmond Howitzers, from a ten-pound Parrott. Of the first shot, Major Alfred A. Woodhull, under date of June 8, 1886, wrote,--On the 17th of September, 1862, I was standing in Weed's battery, whose position is correctly given in the map, when a man on, I think, a gray horse,
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
t against Jackson, it was driven back as far as the post-and-rail fence in the east open, where they were checked. They were outside of the line, their left in the air and exposed to the fire of a thirty-gun battery posted at long range on the Hagerstown road by General Doubleday. Their left was withdrawn, and the. line rectified, when Greene's brigade of the Twelfth resumed position in the northeast angle of the wood, which it held until Sedgwick's division came in bold march. In these fngton Artillery was called on for a battery to assist them, and some of the guns of that battalion were sent for ammunition. Miller's battery of four Napoleon guns came. As Jackson withdrew, General Hooker's corps retired to a point on the Hagerstown road about three-quarters of a mile north of the battle-ground, where General Doubleday established his thirty-gun battery. Jackson's and Hooker's men had fought to exhaustion, and the battle of the Twelfth Corps, taken up and continued by Man
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
hree days, and its total of casualties on either side, terrible as it was, should be one-third larger to make the average per diem equal to the losses at Sharpsburg. Viewed by the measure of losses, Antietam was the fourth battle of the war, Spottsylvania and the Wilderness, as well as Gettysburg, exceeding it in number of killed and wounded, but each of these dragged its tragedy through several days. Taking Confederate losses in killed and wounded as the criterion of magnitude in battles,ral losses, returned specifically for the day. These show a total killed and wounded of 11,657 (or, including the captured and missing, 12,410), as contrasted with 17,567 killed and wounded in three days at Gettysburg, 16,141 in eight days at Spottsylvania, and 14,283 in the three days at the Wilderness, while the three and two days' fighting respectively at Chancellorsville and Chickamauga were actually productive of less loss than this battle of one day. The exceeding losses of this battle a
Lafayette McLaws (search for this): chapter 18
ny officers among the fallen early in the day McLaws and Walker in time to meet Sumner's advance un would go, others went for fresh supplies. McLaws's column came up at nine o'clock. He reported nels Grigsby and Stafford off the left front. McLaws's division was called for, and on the march un leaving the Dunker chapel on his left. As McLaws approached, General Hood was sent to give him rawn from R. H. Anderson's column to reinforce McLaws. Sedgwick's diagonal march exposed his lefsteady march while Walker increased his fire. McLaws increasing his fire staggered the march of Sedces, opened fire on Sedgwick's right rear. At McLaws's opening Sedgwick essayed to form line of bath was soon followed by the other brigades. McLaws and Walker, pushing their success, were joinedpoleons in the centre, and a single battery at McLaws's rear, with fragments of scattered brigades art of hands and ammunition, even for two guns; McLaws's division and the other part of Walker's were[1 more...]
John Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 18
Walker in time to meet Sumner's advance under Sedgwick around Dunker chapel Richardson's splendid theast angle of the wood, which it held until Sedgwick's division came in bold march. In these fbe by the Second Corps, under General Sumner; Sedgwick's division was in the lead as they marched. h and Richardson followed in left echelon to Sedgwick. Hood's brigades had retired for fresh supplmner rode with his leading division under General Sedgwick, to find the battle. Sedgwick marched inSedgwick marched in column of brigades, Gorman, Dana, and Howard. There was no officer on the Union side in charge of ositions of McLaws and other Confederates and Sedgwick at their opening. The regiment opened prompt H. Anderson's column to reinforce McLaws. Sedgwick's diagonal march exposed his left to a scattews increasing his fire staggered the march of Sedgwick, and presently arrested it. The regiments undn Sedgwick's right rear. At McLaws's opening Sedgwick essayed to form line of battle; the increasin[2 more...]
William Barksdale (search for this): chapter 18
In the mean time General Mansfield had been killed, and a portion of his corps (formerly Banks's) had also been thrown into confusion. Report of Committee, part i. p. 368. He passed Greene's brigade of the Twelfth, and marched through the wood, leaving the Dunker chapel on his left. As McLaws approached, General Hood was sent to give him careful instructions of the posture, of the grounds, and the impending crisis. He marched with his brigades, --Cobb's, Kershaw's, Semmes's, and Barksdale's. The leading brigade filed to the right, before the approaching march. Kershaw's leading regiment filed into line as Sedgwick's column approached the south side of the Dunker chapel wood,--the latter on a diagonal march,while Kershaw's regiment was in fair front against it. Relative positions of McLaws and other Confederates and Sedgwick at their opening. The regiment opened prompt fire, and the other regiments came into line in double time, opening fire by company as they came to th
A. Van Home Ellis (search for this): chapter 18
tion; fragments of Ripley's brigade and some others were on the turnpike; Miller was short of hands and ammunition, even for two guns; McLaws's division and the other part of Walker's were in front of threatenings of parts of French's division and of troops rallying on their front, and the Sixth Corps was up and coming against them, so that it seemed hazardous to call them off and leave an open way. Our line was throbbing at every point, so that I dared not call on General Lee for help. Sergeant Ellis thought that he could bring up ammunition if he was authorized to order it. He was authorized, and rode for and brought it. I held the horses of some of my staff who helped to man the guns as cannoneers. As the attacking forces drew nearer, Colonel Cooke reported his ammunition exhausted. He was ordered to hold on with the bayonet, and sent in return that he would hold till ice forms in regions where it was never known, or words to that effect. As Richardson advanced through the co
t of the gun all eyes were turned to see the occasion of it, and then to observe the object, when the shell was seen to explode as if in the hands of the officer. It had been dropped squarely upon the drawing-table, and Lieutenant Wagner was mortally wounded. Of this shot, Captain A. B. More, of Richmond, Virginia, wrote, under date of June 16, 1886,-- The Howitzers have always been proud of that shot, and, thinking it would interest you, I write to say that it was fired by Corporal Holzburton, of the Second Company, Richmond Howitzers, from a ten-pound Parrott. Of the first shot, Major Alfred A. Woodhull, under date of June 8, 1886, wrote,--On the 17th of September, 1862, I was standing in Weed's battery, whose position is correctly given in the map, when a man on, I think, a gray horse, appeared about a mile in front of us, and footmen were recognized near. Captain Weed, who was a remarkable artillerist, himself sighted and fired the gun at the horse, which was struck.
C. W. Squires (search for this): chapter 18
ries were put into action under the line of skirmishers, that were reinforced by Sykes's division of the Fifth and Tenth Infantry under Lieutenant Poland. General Hill seized a musket and by example speedily collected a number of men, who joined him in reinforcing the line threatened by this heavy display. The parts of brigades under General Pryor, Colonels Cummings, Posey, and G. T. Anderson afterwards got up to help the brigade of Evans already there. By these, with the batteries of Squires, Gardner, and Richardson, this threatening demonstration was checked. Then it was reinforced by the batteries of Randol, Kusserow, and Van Reed, and the Fourth United States Infantry, Captain Dryer; the first battalion of the Twelfth, Captain Blount; second battalion of the Twelfth, Captain Anderson; first battalion of the Fourteenth, Captain Brown, and second battalion of the Fourteenth, Captain McKibbin, of Sykes's division; the batteries posted to command the field, right and left, to c
Winfield S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 18
some of his batteries. The Confederates meanwhile were collecting other batteries and infantry in defence, when a shot from one of our batteries brought Richardson down, mortally wounded. His taking-off broke the aggressive spirit of the division and reduced its fight to the defensive. The regiments at the Piper House found their position thus advanced too much exposed, and withdrew to the stronger line of the crest. General Meagher's brigade came up with ammunition replenished. General Hancock was despatched to take command of the division. In the midst of the tragedy, as Richardson approached the east crest, there was a moment of amusement when General Hill, with about fifty men and a battle-flag, ran to gain a vantage-point for flank fire against Richardson's left. Colonel Ross, observing the move and appreciating the opportunity, charged with two regiments for the same and secured it. General Hill claimed (and rightly) that it had effect in giving the impression that the
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