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Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.99
el him either to retreat, leaving the railroad communication of Cheatham and Longstreet exposed, or else fight a battle with his diminished forces. From General Grant's order of November 7th the following extract is made: . . I deem the best movement to attract the enemy to be an attack on the north end of Missionary Ridge with all the force you can bring to bear against it, and, when that is carried, to threaten, and even attack if possible, the enemy's line of communication between Dalton and Cleveland. . . . The movement should not be made one moment later than to-morrow morning. It will be seen from this order that the plan proposed by me had been entirely changed, for while I had proposed only to threaten the seizure of the north-west end of Missionary Ridge, General Grant proposed to attack the enemy by carrying the ridge, and then to threaten, and even attack if possible, the lines of communication; that is, to bring on a general engagement. When it is remembered tha
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 9.99
t, on the 19th of October I started to make a personal examination of the north side of the Tennessee River below Chattanooga. The object was to find some point on the south side, the holding of whireliminary movements were simple. Sherman was to effect a lodgment on the left bank of the Tennessee River, just below the mouth of the South Chickamauga Creek. This was to be done by landing a brievening of the first day the results could be summed up as follows: Sherman had crossed the Tennessee River at the point selected, but had not turned Bragg's right flank. Thomas had drawn out the Aren Bridgeport and the Raccoon Mountain and the nose of Raccoon Mountain where it struck the Tennessee River, we might use William's Island as a depot of supplies, the transportation from Bridgeport bt have remained a week at Chattanooga, under the then existing lines for obtaining supplies. Military bridge over the Tennessee River at Chattanooga, Suilt in October, 1868. from a photograph.
Bridgeport, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9.99
way of shortening our distance to the railroad at Bridgeport, on the 19th of October I started to make a persoolding of which would secure to us the river from Bridgeport through the Raccoon Mountain, and the short road cessary orders for the cooperating movements from Bridgeport, which were a vital part of the operations. Afteve time at which Hooker's column was to move from Bridgeport. That took place after the arrival of General Gry life; and had the plan for opening the route to Bridgeport, and the orders necessary for its execution, emanend of Lookout Valley and open communication with Bridgeport by road and river was nearly completed. If alut Valley, or a movement by Hooker's command from Bridgeport, although 1 was his chief engineer and troops undseemed to me that, by holding the country between Bridgeport and the Raccoon Mountain and the nose of Raccoon d as a depot of supplies, the transportation from Bridgeport being by water. Determined to go and see if such
Henry M. Cist (search for this): chapter 9.99
ot carried in time to be of more than secondary importance in the battle. The assault on the center before either flank was turned was never seriously contemplated, and was made without plan, without orders, and as above stated. Ii. By Henry M. Cist, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. General Smith very clearly shows that the plan for the movement was originated some time prior to General Grant's arrival at Chattanooga, and that the only part of the plan Grant was concerned in was thes. In his order he was careful to give me credit for planning as well as executing, and if he had had any such plan given to him by General Rosecrans he would certainly have not committed the injustice of giving me the credit for the plan. General Cist's quotation from my report refers only to the William's Island project, which I gave up as soon as I saw the ground, and that may have been an idea of General Rosecrans, but he certainly had never taken any steps to find out if it were practic
Charles A. Dana (search for this): chapter 9.99
ooga, and before he had even started on his trip to Brown's Ferry, Mr. Dana had sketched to the Secretary of War the substance of the whole movement. Telegrams of Dana to Stanton, October 23d and 24th, 10 A. M. That General Thomas had, after General Grant's arrival, to put before aken in the main from official papers. In November, 1863, Mr. Charles A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, was at Chattanooga. Under dater the impression that the order related to my plan, referred to in Mr. Dana's dispatch of November 5th, said, If I attempt to carry out the orned the army at Chattanooga. On the 8th of November, at 11 A. M., Mr. Dana sent to the Secretary of War the following dispatch: Reconnoisgineer and troops under my command were making boats for bridges. Mr. Dana telegraphed to Mr. Stanton early in October that Rosecrans would taintained, as it would have been under close fire of artillery. Mr. Dana also telegraphed to Mr. Stanton that Rosecrans had ordered Hooker
E. M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 9.99
Secretary of War the substance of the whole movement. Telegrams of Dana to Stanton, October 23d and 24th, 10 A. M. That General Thomas had, after General Grant'sary division of the Miss. Chattanooga, Tennessee, November 12th, 1863. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Sir: I would respectfully recommend that Brigadier-Gewas at Chattanooga. Under date of November 5th, 11 A. M., he telegraphed to Mr. Stanton: . . . Grant and Thomas considering plan proposed by W. F. Smith to adva unless under the guns of our forts at Chattanooga. The next telegram to Secretary Stanton referring to this move is dated November 7th at 10 A. M., and states: ops under my command were making boats for bridges. Mr. Dana telegraphed to Mr. Stanton early in October that Rosecrans would throw a bridge from Moccasin Point intuld have been under close fire of artillery. Mr. Dana also telegraphed to Mr. Stanton that Rosecrans had ordered Hooker to concentrate his troops with a view to m
George K. Leet (search for this): chapter 9.99
1863. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Sir: I would respectfully recommend that Brigadier-General William F. Smith be placed first on the list for promotion to the rank of major-general. He is possessed of one of the clearest military heads in the army — is very practical and industrious — no man in the service is better qualified than he for our largest commands. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, (Official) Major-General. Signed, Geo. K. Leet, Assistant Adjutant-General. Not only is it due to the truth of history that this evidence of General Grant's military appreciation of the movement on Brown's Ferry should appear, but it also establishes his generosity of character in giving credit where he felt it to be due. At some future time I may have an opportunity of doing justice to the memory of General George H. Thomas, whose comparatively early death was so great a loss to the country. The civil war developed no higher
William S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 9.99
troops. In the execution of all of this General Rosecrans was ably seconded by the very efficient grew out of the request of General Thomas to Rosecrans, Now, General, I want you to be kind enough ard to rations was well under way. Under General Rosecrans's orders General Smith gave his attentioainst the claim of General Grant. But as to Rosecrans, let us see what General Thomas himself says it, and that he carried out the plan of General Rosecrans in the final movement. Iii. Postscriy after my arrival at Chattanooga I told General Rosecrans that he could not supply his army over that I had to propose. It is impossible that Rosecrans could have developed any plan for opening tho prepare boats and bridge materials. General Rosecrans could not have informed his generals, wiround, and that may have been an idea of General Rosecrans, but he certainly had never taken any strry till I saw it. I did not report on it to Rosecrans, and I do not believe that Rosecrans had mat[18 more...]
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 9.99
a proper one under all circumstances. It will be seen that in the plan proposed by me, as chief engineer, only a threat to seize the north-west end of Missionary Ridge was intended, and with the idea that such a feint might force the recall of Longstreet. I think I may safely state that I did not propose at that time, in view of the condition of the Army of the Cumberland, to suggest anything that would bring on a general battle unless under the guns of our forts at Chattanooga. The next tele Ridge immediately afterward. If successful, this operation will divide Bragg's forces in Chattanooga valley from those in the valley of the Chickamauga, and will compel him either to retreat, leaving the railroad communication of Cheatham and Longstreet exposed, or else fight a battle with his diminished forces. From General Grant's order of November 7th the following extract is made: . . I deem the best movement to attract the enemy to be an attack on the north end of Missionary Ridge
Perrin V. Fox (search for this): chapter 9.99
k, point of Lookout Mountain. small force to hold the place, and, secondly, to look out for the communications by which the army was supplied. In the performance of that duty I was actively engaged in building boats and material for bridges, and was studying earnestly to find some way of restoring our short line of communications lost by the giving up of Lookout Mountain and Valley. I found a most excellent company of volunteers styled Michigan Engineers and mechanics, commanded by Captain Perrin V. Fox. Before my arrival they had set up a saw-mill, and were engaged in making boats and flooring, etc., for military bridges. In pursuance of the paramount necessity of finding some way of shortening our distance to the railroad at Bridgeport, on the 19th of October I started to make a personal examination of the north side of the Tennessee River below Chattanooga. The object was to find some point on the south side, the holding of which would secure to us the river from Bridgeport th
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