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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
t of deceiving the enemy, as to my ulterior purposes, and led him to anticipate an unresisted passage of Bull Run. As prescribed in the first and second sections of the paper herewith, marked A, on the morning of the 18th of July, my troops resting on Bull Run, from Union Mills Ford to the Stone Bridge, a distance of about eight miles, were posted as follows: Ewell's brigade occupied a position in vicinity of Union Mills Ford. It consisted of Rhode's 5th and Siebel's 6th regiments of Alabama, and Seymour's 6th regiment of Louisiana volunteers, with four 12-pounder howitzers, of Walton's battery, and Harrison's, Green's and Cabell's companies of Virginia cavalry. D. R. Jones' brigade was in position in rear of McLean's Ford, and consisted of Jenkins' 5th South Carolina, and Bunt's 15th and Fetherstone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
M. At 9 A. M. Richardson's brigade reached Centreville, and found that the enemy had retreated thee--first at Germantown, and subsequently at Centreville, whence he withdrew by my direction, after r regiments. Two and a half miles east of Centreville I heard firing in the advance, and, on reacdisrespectful word even had been uttered in Centreville, by a single Federal soldier, nor had any ot a later hour than I intended, and reached Centreville at about 11 o'clock. The rebels here had thour entire force was ordered to withdraw on Centreville. This is the whole of it,--and I have noad of our division left the encampment near Centreville on Thursday morning, it was supposed that t. Under this impression, we passed through Centreville, (where, by the way, we learned that five oalong the line as our column retired toward Centreville, crying bitterly. I didn't want to have th delight with which he met his companion at Centreville as uninjured as himself, and filled with an[15 more...]
Occoquan River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
ement, I took post to the left of my reserve. Of the topographical features of the country thus occupied, it must suffice to say that Bull Run is a small stream running in this locality, nearly from West to East, to its confluence with the Occoquan River, about twelve miles from the Potomac, and draining a considerable scope of country, from its source in Bull Run Mountain, to a short distance of the Potomac at Occoquan. At this season, habitually low and sluggish, it is, however, rapidly anOccoquan. At this season, habitually low and sluggish, it is, however, rapidly and frequently swollen by the summer rains until unfordable. The banks for the most part are rocky and steep, but abound in long used fords. The country, on either side much broken and thickly wooded, becomes gently rolling and open as it recedes from the stream. On the Northern side the ground is much the highest, and commands the other bank completely. Roads traverse and intersect the surrounding country in almost every direction. Finally, at Mitchell's Ford, the stream is about equidistant
Gainsville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
Headquarters, 1ST Division, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 27, 1861. Gen. McDowell, Commanding Department:-- sir: On the 18th inst. you ordered me to take my division, with two 20-pound rifled guns, and move against Centreville, to carry that position. My division moved from its encampment at 7 A. M. At 9 A. M. Richardson's brigade reached Centreville, and found that the enemy had retreated the night before--one division on the Warrentown turnpike, in the direction of Gainsville, and the other, and by far the largest division, toward Blackburn's Ford, or Bull Run. Finding that Richardson's brigade had turned the latter point and halted for the convenience of obtaining water, I took a squadron of cavalry and two light companies from Richardson's brigade, with Col. Richardson, to make a reconnoissance, and, in feeling our way carefully, we soon found ourselves overlooking the strong position of the enemy, situated at Blackburn's Ford, or Bull Run. A moment's obs
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 114
Doc. 104.-the fight at Blackburn's Ford, Va. July 18, 1861. Report of Gen. Tyler. Headquarters, 1ST Division, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 27, 1861. Gen. McDowell, Commanding Department:-- sir: On the 18th inst. you ordered me to take my division, with two 20-pound rifled guns, and move against Centreville, to carry that position. My division moved from its encampment at 7 A. M. At 9 A. M. Richardson's brigade reached Centreville, and found that the enemy had retreaoth sides at five minutes before four, and our entire force was ordered to withdraw on Centreville. This is the whole of it,--and I have no time to add comments, as this hasty letter must be sent at once by a special messenger, who may reach Washington in time for the four and a half o'clock mail to-morrow morning. General McDowell, who had been to visit the other column, came up just as the engagement was over. I believe he says the existence of this battery was well known, and that the me
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
behind timber, I believe.) When they left it, a concealed battery near the barn opened on our forces, with very little effect, I fancy. Shortly afterwards, more of our artillery came up, and when that opened upon the enemy's position in the woods along the creek border, a second masked battery of theirs, surrounded by their infantry in the woods, replied. That did us considerable damage. I saw four or five of our killed or wounded carried past me to the rear on litters. Dr. Pullston, of Pa., Mr. McCormick, of the N. Y. Evening Post, Mr. Hill, of the N. Y. Tribune, Mr. Raymond, of the N. Y. Times, myself, and a few other civilians, were at that time standing, surrounded by a few straggling soldiers, quietly looking on from the top of the hill, immediately where Gen. Tyler had taken his station. One of the first shells fired from that second battery of the enemy passed between the shoulders of Dr. Pullston and Mr. McCormick, who were arm-in-arm, and burst against a small building
Fall's Church (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
w York Sixty-ninth and Seventy-ninth came up and took position near our other infantry on the flat. Gen. Tyler, on finding that the fire of the second of the enemy's batteries was likely to prove destructive, manoeuvred the infantry into a different position, falling them back with wheeling them. They were all as cool as cucumbers, and executed his orders with as much precision as though engaged in a dress parade on Pennsylvania avenue. I was compelled, by my engagement, to return to Falls Church by nightfall, and then left to return. About six miles from the scene of the engagement I met General McDowell in his carriage, with his staff on horseback. Ere meeting him — indeed, immediately after the arrival of the Sixty-ninth and Seventy-ninth on the field of action, and the change of position of our infantry engaged — the firing on both sides ceased for the time being. It was renewed, however, before I reached where I met General McDowell. He received his first intelligence of
Germantown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
1. General: I have the honor to report that I left the camp at Germantown at an early hour yesterday morning, my brigade consisting of the cuted effort to cut off the retreat of Bonham's brigade--first at Germantown, and subsequently at Centreville, whence he withdrew by my directtions, at 10 A. M. I started after the main body of the army, via Germantown, where I found three of the fine buildings of which the village hion of Col. Heintzelman's division was in the rear, in and around Germantown. Those seen on the road to Centreville were principally of Gen. te females there wore brighter countenances than their sisters of Germantown. When the enemy evacuated the place, (its males having been imprhere has been most happy, indeed, making up for it at Fairfax and Germantown. I proceeded as soon as possible on towards the direction of tted them had we advanced instead of halting for the night between Germantown and Centreville, and thus prevented their joining the rebel force
Bull Run Mountain (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
ar to McLean's and Blackburn's Fords, where two 6-pounders of Walton's battery were in reserve; but, subsequently during the engagement, I took post to the left of my reserve. Of the topographical features of the country thus occupied, it must suffice to say that Bull Run is a small stream running in this locality, nearly from West to East, to its confluence with the Occoquan River, about twelve miles from the Potomac, and draining a considerable scope of country, from its source in Bull Run Mountain, to a short distance of the Potomac at Occoquan. At this season, habitually low and sluggish, it is, however, rapidly and frequently swollen by the summer rains until unfordable. The banks for the most part are rocky and steep, but abound in long used fords. The country, on either side much broken and thickly wooded, becomes gently rolling and open as it recedes from the stream. On the Northern side the ground is much the highest, and commands the other bank completely. Roads trav
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
he thick woods with which the whole bottom of Bull Run was covered. This order was skilfully exectery which we had discovered in the bottom of Bull Run, which we knew to be surrounded by a large boarked A, their withdrawal within the lines of Bull Run was effected with complete success during theed him to anticipate an unresisted passage of Bull Run. As prescribed in the first and second secr general results and events of the action of Bull Run, in conclusion, it is proper to signalize soming and executing the retrograde movements on Bull Run, directed in my orders of the 18th of July--mn of, the retreat from Fairfax Court House on Bull Run. Called from the head of his regiment .by whthe enemy he could not force a passage across Bull Run in the face of our troops, and led him into t progress before the enemy's intrenchments at Bull Run, half way from that village to Manassas Junctm as far back as Centreville, four miles from Bull Run, which is itself about the same distance from[19 more...]
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