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North Dakota (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
e, Assistant Adjutant-General, and Lieut. Jefferson Justice, Quartermaster of the One Hundredth regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, deserve my marked approbation for most effective assistance, and for setting an example of coolness and disregard of personal danger, that aided materially in preserving coolness and intrepidity throughout the command. All of which is respectfully reported. Daniel Leasure, Colonel Commanding Brigade. hazard Stevens, Captain and Ass't Adj.-Gen., Second Division, N. D.D. S. Colonel Williams's report. headquarters Hilton head, July 18, 1862. To His Excellency Gov. Sprague, Providence, R. I.: Governor: I have the honor to enclose herewith the official copy of Major Edwin Metcalf's report of the part taken by his battalion, Third Rhode Island artillery, in the battle of Secessionville, James Island, S. C., June 16th, 1862. Major Metcalf's command were thrown forward into the position of which he first speaks, with the Third New-Hampshire regiment,
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
Doc. 72.-battle at James Island, S. C. see Gen. Benham's narrative, sup. Rebellion record. adquarters First division, N. D. D. S., James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. Major: I have the hodquarters Second division, N. D. D. S., James Island, S. C., June 19, 1862. Brig.-Gen. H. G. Wright, Commanding United States Forces, James Island, S. C.: sir: I have the honor to submit the foll the headquarters of his advanced forces on James Island, and was in command of a general officer. eadquarters First brigade, Second division, James Island, June 17, 1862. Capt. Hazard Stevens, Assisllery, in the battle of Secessionville, James Island, S. C., June 16th, 1862. Major Metcalf's comma Post. Major Metcalf's report. James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. Lieutenant: I have thern District, Department of the South, James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. General order No. 26ing themselves silently at the lower end of James Island. As their plan of assault has proved impra[1 more...]
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
nts, and the gallant and chivalrous McEnery, who, like Blucher, came into the field just in the nick of time. Since the battle, the enemy have been intrenching themselves silently at the lower end of James Island. As their plan of assault has proved impracticable, it is presumed they will be contented hereafter to advance by regular approaches — that is, if they are permitted to do so. Prisoners state that there are nine Federal regiments on the island, and that Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, of Oregon, (the chairman of the Breckinridge National Committee in the last Presidential campaign,) is in command. This man Stevens professed to be an ardent pro-slavery man before the war, and was here in Charleston, enjoying its hospitalities, only two years ago. There is much dissatisfaction here with the military authorities of the department, and a strong wish expressed for a change in the commanding officers. The South-Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so success
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
H, were untiring in their exertions, and zealously supported me. First Lieut. A. W. Colwell, of Co. F, and Second Lieut. D. B. Churchill, of Co. K, particularly attracted my notice by their coolness and energy. I am pleased to name First Sergeant G. W. Green and Sergeant J. B. Batchellee, of Co. B, First Sergeant 0. A. Thompson, of Co. E, and First Sergeant W. Wheeler, Jr., of Co. K, as distinguished for gallant conduct. I shall feel justified in recommending them to the Governor of Rhode Island for promotion. It is with a bitter feeling of regret, though with no sense of shame, that I have to report the serious loss sustained by my battalion. One sergeant, six privates, killed; two officers, four corporals, twenty-four privates, wounded; one corporal, seven privates, missing; total, forty-five. . . . . . . I have the honor to be, Lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Edwin Metcalf, Major Command'g Second Battalion, Third Regt. R. I. Artillery. To Lieut.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
isoners state that there are nine Federal regiments on the island, and that Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, of Oregon, (the chairman of the Breckinridge National Committee in the last Presidential campaign,) is in command. This man Stevens professed to be an ardent pro-slavery man before the war, and was here in Charleston, enjoying its hospitalities, only two years ago. There is much dissatisfaction here with the military authorities of the department, and a strong wish expressed for a change in the commanding officers. The South-Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard spread universal joy omong the troops. If, however, we cannot have Beauregard, we would be glad to get Huger, Magruder, Hill of North-Carolina, Whiting, Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, or any other first-class general. A change of some kind is necessary to restore confidence to the troops and people.
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
in line of battle, and partially covered by a small growth of underbrush, poured upon the gunners of the work, and upon the two batteries of infantry drawn up facing them across the marsh, a continuous and deadly fire. The gun-carriages were torn and perforated by many balls. Many of our men fell at the guns and along the line forward, to the rearward of the battery and its right flank. The contest was very unequal and trying. It raged for some time, but at this critical juncture, the Louisiana batteries came up gallantly at the double-quick, under its skilful officer, Lieut.-Col. McHenry. By the guidance of Major Hudson, of Smith's battalion, it formed on the right of that corps, facing the marsh. The reinforcement and its galling fire disheartened the foe. Capt. Boyce, with one gun of light artillery, began to play on his rear. He began to fall back, fairly beaten off. While the struggle was progressing, immediately on the rear right flank of the battery against these three
Secessionville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
ulting column against the enemy's works at Secessionville, and being formed in the utmost silence atvens was to assault and carry the works at Secessionville: that composed of the troops of Gen. Williapidly upon the enemy's works at and about Secessionville, with a view of carrying them by a coup de lying between the work and the village of Secessionville. It will thus be seen that the whole frhe force of the enemy on the Peninsula, at Secessionville and in the immediate defence of his works, to the left along the road leading toward Secessionville, to form, if possible, a junction with Genccount. Charleston, June 18, 1862. Secessionville is a small village, the summer retreat of mouth. This creek runs immediately up to Secessionville. On the west of the village, a short shal some four or five hundred yards south of Secessionville. Here Lamar's battery is located across te two battalions of infantry, stationed at Secessionville to support the battery, were laboriously o[2 more...]
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 72
inued actively on duty throughout the action, and was the last man to leave the field. Capt. A. P. Rockwell, of the Connecticut battery, deserves particular mention for his gallant bearing and skilful handling of his guns on that field. His senicommand of Lieut.-Col. Graves; third, Seventh Connecticut volunteers, Lieut.-Col. Hawley, followed by a section of the Connecticut battery; fourth, Twenty-eighth Massachusetts volunteers, Lieut.-Colonel Moore. On passing the house beyond the marsh,tinued shower of grape and canister, as well as musketry, on nearing the work. In the mean time, one section of the Connecticut battery had opened on the enemy from our left, and the march of this regiment at first was between two fires. I refere said to be the Seventy-ninth New-York (Highlanders) the Eighth Michigan, one from Massachusetts, a New-Hampshire and Connecticut regiments. But for the distance of our troops and the brief time occupied in the action, together with obstructions i
C. G. Strahan (search for this): chapter 72
m, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Robert Williams, Col. First Mass. Cavalry, Commanding Post. Major Metcalf's report. James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. Lieutenant: I have the honor to report, that in accordance with instructions received in the evening of the fifteenth instant, from the Acting Brigadier--General Commanding First division, headquarters brigade, my battalion was held in readiness to move at three o'clock on the morning of the sixteenth, company I (Capt. Strahan) being detailed for duty at the battery in advance of the First brigade, and a detachment under Lieut. Metcalf, of company K, remaining in charge of the battery at this point. My command comprised but five companies, B, E, F, H, and K, numbering three hundred and sixty enlisted men, with two field, three staff, and fourteen company-officers. Leading the brigade, three companies, B, F, and K, of my battalion were deployed as skirmishers, under the direction of Major Sisson, at the ent
Benjamin R. Lyons (search for this): chapter 72
st necessity. At the first break of day, or about four o'clock, it being a dark and cloudy morning, the entire command was in motion. My Aid-de-Camp, Lieut. Benjamin R. Lyons, with a negro guide, was at the head of the storming party. My Aid-de-Camp, Captain William T. Lusk, guided the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts. The commng companies, were killed, and Capts. Doyle and Lewis and Lieut. Bates, commanding companies, were wounded on or near the parapet of the work. My Aid-de-Camp, Lieut. Lyons, who led the storming party, and the first man to cross the ditch, was severely wounded on the berme of the work, and was obliged to retire. Of twenty-two offe information, to the great exposure of his life, as was Aid, Captain William T. Lusk and my Acting Aid, Lieut. O. M. Dearborn, Third New-Hampshire volunteers. Lieut. Lyons, my Junior Aid, led the storming column; was the first man to cross the ditch and make the ascent of the parapet. My Division Quartermaster, Lieut. Jefferson
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