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Rock Creek, Menard County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
thick abatis — Jones' brigade in advance, followed by Nicholls' and Steuart's. General Walker was directed to follow, but reporting to me that the enemy were advancing upon him from their right, he was ordered to repulse them and follow on as soon as possible. The opposing force was larger and the time consumed longer than was anticipated, in consequence of which General Walker did not arrive in time to participate in the assault that night. By the time my other brigades had crossed Rock creek and reached the base of the mountain, it was dark. His skirmishers were driven in and the attack made with great vigor and spirit. It was as successful as could have been expected, considering the superiority of the enemy's force and position. Steuart's brigade, on the left, carried a line of breastworks which ran perpendicularly to the enemy's main line, captured a number of prisoners and a stand of colors, and the whole line advanced to within short range, and kept up a heavy fire u
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
or the purpose of feeling the enemy, and desultory firing was maintained with their skirmishers until 4 P. M., at which hour I ordered Major Latimer to open fire with all of his pieces from the only eligible hill within range, Jones' brigade being properly disposed as a support. The hill was directly in front of the wooded mountain and a little to the left of the Cemetery hills, consequently exposed to the concentrated fire from both, and also to an enfilade fire from a battery near the Baltimore road. The unequal contest was maintained for two hours, with considerable damage to the enemy, as will appear from the accompanying report of Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews. Major Latimer having reported to me that the exhausted condition of his horses and men, together with the terrible fire of the enemy's artillery, rendered his position untenable, he was ordered to cease firing and withdraw all of his pieces except four, which were left in position to cover the advance of my infantry.
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
one instance, when the Twenty-sixth North Carolina regiment encountered the second line of the enemy, his dead marked his line of battle with the accuracy of a line at dress parade. Archer's brigade on the right, Colonel D. B. Fry commanding, after advancing a short distance, discovered a large body of cavalry on its right flank. Colonel Fry judiciously changed his front, thus protecting the right flank of the division during the engagement. This brigade (Archer's), the heroes of Chancellorsville, fully maintained its hard won and well-deserved reputation. The officer making the report of the part it played in the first and second charges, has failed to particularize any officer or soldier who displayed particular gallantry, which accounts for no one being named from this gallant little brigade. After breaking through the first and second lines of the enemy, and several of the regiments being out of ammunition, General Pender's division relieved my own, and continued the pur
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
July, including the part it took in the battle of Gettysburg--first day--July 1st, 1863. The division reached Cashtown, Pennsylvania, on the 29th of June. Cashtown is situated at the base of the South Mountain, on the direct road from ChambersbuCashtown is situated at the base of the South Mountain, on the direct road from Chambersburg via Fayetteville to Gettysburg, and nine miles from the latter place. On the morning of the 30th of June, I ordered Brigadier-General Pettigrew to take his brigade to Gettysburg, search the town for army supplies, shoes especially, and return tinfantry force. Under these circumstances he did not deem it advisable to enter the town, and returned, as directed, to Cashtown. The result of General Pettigrew's observations was reported to Lieutenant-General Hill, who reached Cashtown on the evCashtown on the evening of the 30th. On the 1st of July, my division, accompanied by Pegram's battalion of artillery, was ordered to move at 5 o'clock A. M. in the direction of Gettysburg. On nearing Gettysburg it was evident that the enemy was in the vicinity of
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
rations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five miles, rendered the more fatiguing because of obstruction caused by wagons of Longstreet's corps. Late on the night of July 1st I moved along the G. & Y. railroad to the northeast of the town and formed line of battle in a ravine
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6.41
encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five miles, rendered the more fatiguing because of obstruction caused by wagons of Longstreet's corps. Late on the night of July 1st I moved along the G. & Y. railroad to the northeast of the town and formed line of battle in a ravine in an open field — Nicholls' brigade on the right, next Jones', Steuart's and Walker's on the left; pickets were thrown well t
Greencastle (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
stown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
Carpenter's batteries. On June 16th my division left camp at Stephenson's and marched to Sbepherdstown, where Jones' brigade was temporarily detached, with orders to destroy a number of canal boats and a quantity of grain and flour stored at different points, and cut the canal (Chesapeake and Ohio canal). A report of his operations and the disposition made of his captures has been forwarded. June 18th we crossed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in tim
Greenville, Mercer County, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
ssed the Potomac at Boteler's ford and encamped upon the battle-ground of Sharpsburg; thence marched via Hagerstown and Chambersburg to within three miles of Carlisle. From Greencastle, Steuart's brigade was ordered to McConnellsburg to collect horses, cattle and other supplies which the army needed. The brigade having accomplished its mission to my satisfaction rejoined the division at our camp near Carlisle. On the 29th June, in obedience to orders, I countermarched my division to Greenville, thence eastwardly by way of Scotland to Gettysburg — not arriving in time, however, to participate in the action of the 1st instant. The last day's march was twenty-five miles, rendered the more fatiguing because of obstruction caused by wagons of Longstreet's corps. Late on the night of July 1st I moved along the G. & Y. railroad to the northeast of the town and formed line of battle in a ravine in an open field — Nicholls' brigade on the right, next Jones', Steuart's and Walker's
Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.41
r-General. Report of Major-General H. Heth. headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have the honor to report the operations of my division from the 29th June until the 1st of July, including the part it took in the battle of Gettysburg--first day--July 1st, 1863. The division reached Cashtown, Pennsylvania, on the 29th of June. Cashtown is situated at the base of the South Mountain, on the direct road from Chambersburg via Fayetteville to Gettysburg, and nine miles from the latter place. On the morning of the 30th of June, I ordered Brigadier-General Pettigrew to take his brigade to Gettysburg, search the town for army supplies, shoes especially, and return the same day. On reaching the suburbs of Gettysburg, General Pettigrew found a large force of cavalry near the town, supported by an infantry force. Under these circumstances he did not deem it advisable to enter the town, and returned, as directed, to Cashtown.
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