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California (California, United States) (search for this): entry commerce-of-the-united-states
rew propeller, the iron and steel vessels, and the thousands of articles from the factory which form an important part of the cargoes which they carry—all these are the inventions of the century, and all have contributed greatly to the producing and transporting power of man, and consequently to the multiplication of the commodities which he produces and exchanges. Finance and financiers have contributed enormously to the growth of the commerce of the century. The gold discoveries in California and Australia, and later in other parts of the world, have greatly increased the volume of the circulating medium and encouraged the creation of a single and well-defined standard of value, so that the merchant may make his sales and purchases with an assurance that payments will be made in a measure of value acceptable to the whole world, and losses and uncertainty of traffic thus avoided. The supply of this precious metal has increased enormously during the century. Chevalier estimated
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): entry commerce-of-the-united-states
unications between continents and great trading centres; a ship canal will connect the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific; and vessels circumnavigating the globe in the interests of commerce may take further advantage of currents of air and water which move ever westward as the earth revolves ever towards the east; other ship canals will connect our Great Lakes with the ocean, and steamships from Europe and the Mediterrane countries and the Orient will land their merchandise at the docks of Chicago and Duluth, and the other great commercial cities of our inland seas; a great railway system will stretch from South America to Bering Straits, thence down the eastern coast of Siberia, through China, Siam, Burmah, across India, Persia, Arabia, past the pyramids of Egypt to the westernmost point of Africa, where only 1,600 miles of ocean will intervene to prevent the complete encircling of the earth with a belt of steel, whose branches will penetrate to every habitable part of every contine
nt of interchange among nations and peoples, by which articles most readily produced in one part of the world are exchanged for those most readily produced in another part. The great fertile plains of North America, South America, Australia, and Russia have become the world's producers of grain and provisions, and are increasing their supplies of the textiles and their supplies of the food-stuffs required by all the world in manufacturing or for daily consumption; while the Orient stands ready s and the Orient will land their merchandise at the docks of Chicago and Duluth, and the other great commercial cities of our inland seas; a great railway system will stretch from South America to Bering Straits, thence down the eastern coast of Siberia, through China, Siam, Burmah, across India, Persia, Arabia, past the pyramids of Egypt to the westernmost point of Africa, where only 1,600 miles of ocean will intervene to prevent the complete encircling of the earth with a belt of steel, whose
Hawaii (Hawaii, United States) (search for this): entry commerce-of-the-united-states
e in exports the increase was $6,500,000, chiefly in manufactures. From Asia the importations increased more than $50,000,000, the increase being chiefly in sugar and raw materials required by our manufacturers, such as silk, hemp, jute, and tin; while to Asia the increase in United States exports was nearly $40,000,000, principally in manufactures and raw cotton. From Oceanica the imports showed little increase, though this is due in part to the absence of statistics of importation from Hawaii in the last half of 1900; while to Oceanica there was an increase in United States exports of more than $20,000,000, chiefly in manufactured articles. From Africa the increase in imports was $6,000,000, principally in manufacturers' materials, of which raw cotton forms the most important item, while the exports increased meantime $17,000,000, chiefly in manufactures. The following tables show the imports and exports of the United States by grand divisions in the calendar years 1890 and 190
the Orient stands ready with its silks and teas, and Africa tenders its gold and diamonds and ivory and native tropical products, all of which articles are required by the great manufacturing centres of the United States and Europe, which furnish in exchange their manufactures of cotton, wool, silk, wood, iron, and steel. Thus commerce is constantly increasing its volume by its own activity. The machinery produced by the manufacturing section enables one man in the great grainfields of America to produce as much as. a dozen or a score could produce by old methods at the beginning of the century or even later. The machinery of the factory enables a single individual to multiply many times his power of producing the articles required by his fellow-men. Exploration, colonization, and investment of capital have greatly increased the producing area of the tropical section of the world. Added to all these, and making practicable the interchange of articles whose production is thus s
in existence by 1850, while by 1860 the total had reached nearly 100,000 miles, by 1870 280,000 miles, by 1880 440,000 miles, by 1890 768,000 miles, and by 1900 1,000,000 miles. Submarine cables, by which the international commerce is guided and multiplied, date from 1851, in which year 25 miles were put into operation across the English Channel. By 1860 the total length of successful lines was about 1,500 miles, though one cable laid across the Atlantic, and another through the Red and Arabian seas, meantime, had worked long enough to prove the practicability of the enterprise. By 1870 the submarine cables in operation amounted to about 15,000 miles, by 1880 to about 50,000 miles, by 1890 to 132,000 miles, and by 1898 to 170,000 miles, the number of messages transmitted on them being 6,000,000 a year, while those by the land telegraphs are estimated at 1,000,000 per day, the greater proportion of both being in the service of commerce. Invention has also contributed largely to th
e interests of commerce may take further advantage of currents of air and water which move ever westward as the earth revolves ever towards the east; other ship canals will connect our Great Lakes with the ocean, and steamships from Europe and the Mediterrane countries and the Orient will land their merchandise at the docks of Chicago and Duluth, and the other great commercial cities of our inland seas; a great railway system will stretch from South America to Bering Straits, thence down the eastern coast of Siberia, through China, Siam, Burmah, across India, Persia, Arabia, past the pyramids of Egypt to the westernmost point of Africa, where only 1,600 miles of ocean will intervene to prevent the complete encircling of the earth with a belt of steel, whose branches will penetrate to every habitable part of every continent, and place men in all climes and all nations and all continents in constant communication with each other and facilitate the interchange of commodities between them.
r created by countless waterfalls now inaccessible for manufacturing purposes; steamships will develop their carrying powers and multiply communications between continents and great trading centres; a ship canal will connect the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific; and vessels circumnavigating the globe in the interests of commerce may take further advantage of currents of air and water which move ever westward as the earth revolves ever towards the east; other ship canals will connect our Great Lakes with the ocean, and steamships from Europe and the Mediterrane countries and the Orient will land their merchandise at the docks of Chicago and Duluth, and the other great commercial cities of our inland seas; a great railway system will stretch from South America to Bering Straits, thence down the eastern coast of Siberia, through China, Siam, Burmah, across India, Persia, Arabia, past the pyramids of Egypt to the westernmost point of Africa, where only 1,600 miles of ocean will interven
United States (United States) (search for this): entry commerce-of-the-united-states
has marked the commercial relations of the United States in recent years is still more strikingly s41,000,000. From Asia the imports into the United States increased from $69,000,000 in 1890 to $12300,000 in 1900. From Europe, to which the United States was accustomed to look for manufactures, tte, and tin; while to Asia the increase in United States exports was nearly $40,000,000, principalltables show the imports and exports of the United States by grand divisions in the calendar years 1 by the great manufacturing centres of the United States and Europe, which furnish in exchange thei rail began in England in 1825, and in the United States in 1830, the number of miles of railway ine West India hurricane in 1818 reached the United States fully thirty days after its occurrence, whof the stated value of the exports. The United States has performed well her part in the century79,000,000 to $19,915,000,000, that of the United States has increased from $162,000,000 to over $2[3 more...]
,500,000 in 1890 to $22,000,000 in 1900. From Europe, to which the United States was accustomed to ures, the imports fell over $35,000,000, while Europe largely increased her consumption of cotton-seStatistics: Exports. Continent.1890.1900. Europe$682,585,856 $1,111,456,000 North America 95,5speed and safety. A century ago the voyage to Europe occupied over a month, and was a cause for con morning. The merchant who desires to sell in Europe may contract his goods before shipping, and thChevalier estimated that the amount of gold in Europe in 1492 was but $60,000,000. From that time topicion could be charged—practically suspended European commerce. In addition to this, the danger frthe century, British, French, and finally all European vessels were practically prohibited from engang the century. The area under cultivation in Europe, America, and Australia is estimated to have ireat Lakes with the ocean, and steamships from Europe and the Mediterrane countries and the Orient w[5 more...]
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