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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 27 total hits in 16 results.

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Cooper, miles 1735-1785 Clergyman; born in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine
in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine in 1776. He died in Edinburgh, May 1, 1785.
Cooper, miles 1735-1785 Clergyman; born in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine
May 1st, 1785 AD (search for this): entry cooper-miles
in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine in 1776. He died in Edinburgh, May 1, 1785.
Cooper, miles 1735-1785 Clergyman; born in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine
Cooper, miles 1735-1785 Clergyman; born in England in 1735; graduated at Oxford University in 1761, and came to America the next year, sent by Archbishop Seeker as an assistant to Dr. Samuel Johnson, president of King's College. He succeeded Johnson as president in 1763. He was an active Tory when the Revolution broke out, and was reputed one of the authors, if not the author, of a tract entitled A friendly address to all reasonable Americans. Alexander Hamilton was then a pupil in the college, and he answered the pamphlet with ability. Cooper became very obnoxious to the Whigs, and a public letter, signed Three millions, warned him and his friends that their lives were in danger. On the night of May 10 a mob, led by Sons of Liberty, after destroying or carrying guns on the Battery, proceeded to drive him from the college. He succeeded in escaping to a British vessel, and sailed for England. He commemorated this stirring event by a poem printed in the Gentleman's magazine
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