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Calhoun, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
t on foot, alone. After two miles running, they met the down freight train from Adamsville-reversed and ran it backward to that place, switched off the cars on a side track, and with the engine made fine time to. Calhoun, where they met the regular down passenger train. Here they made a momentary halt, took on board a number of well armed volunteers, a company of track hands to repair the track as they went along, and a telegraph operator, and continued the chase. A short distance above Calhoun they saw, for the first time, the runaway train ahead of them. The Yanks, supposing themselves now well out of danger, were quietly oiling the engine, taking up track, etc., but finding themselves discovered, they mounted and sped away, throwing out upon the track, as they fled, the heavy cross-ties with which they had provided themselves; which was done by breaking out the end of the hindmost box car, and pitching them out. The rails which they had last taken up they now carried off with
Chattanooga Valley (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
spread wings flapped grandly. But it had not swooped; the gray quarry yet perched upon Mission Ridge; the rebel army was terribly battered at the edges, but there full in our front it grimly waited, biding out its time. If the horns of the rebel crescent could not be doubled crushingly together, in a shapeless mass, possibly it might be sundered at its centre, and tumbled in fragments over the other side of Mission Ridge. Sherman was halted upon the left; Hooker was holding hard in Chattanooga Valley; the Fourth Corps, that rounded out our centre, grew impatient of restraint; the day was waning; but little time remained to complete the commanding general's grand design; Gordon Granger's hour had come; his work was full before him. And what a work that was to make a weak man falter and a brave man think! One and a half miles to traverse, with narrow fringes of woods, rough valleys, sweeps of open field, rocky acclivities, to the base of the ridge, and no foot in all the breadth
Hudson (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ry. Yorke, with the third squadron, was in advance, and as we moved, he managed so well that he bagged every picket on the road. Thus we had got almost upon the rebel camp before we were discovered. We rode right into Jones' Brigade, the First Jersey and First Pennsylvania charging together; and before they had recovered from the alarm we had a hundred and fifty prisoners. The rebels were then forming thick upon the hill-side by the station, and they had a battery playing upon us like fun. May as we did. In our regiment almost every soldier must have settled his man. Sergeant Craig, of Company K, I believe, killed three. Slate, of the same company, also went above the average. But we lost terribly. Sixty enlisted. men of the First Jersey were killed, wounded, or missing. Colonel Wyndham was wounded, but kept his saddle; Lieutenant-Colonel Broderick and Major Shelmire were killed; Lieutenant Brooks was wounded; Captain Sawyer and Lieutenant Crocker were taken prisoners; and I, as
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ersack behind him, as he could not get through with it upon him. Once out they proceeded up the street, keeping in the shade of the buildings, and passed eastwardly through the city. A description of the route pursued by this party, and of the tribulations through which they passed, will give some idea of the rough time they all had of it. Colonel Kendrick had, before leaving the prison, mapped out his course, and concluded that the best route to take was the one toward Norfolk or Fortress Monroe, as there were fewer rebel pickets in that direction. They therefore kept the York River railroad to the left, and moved toward the Chickahominy river. They passed through Boar Swamp, and crossed the road leading to Bottom Bridge. Sometimes they waded through mud and water almost up to their necks, and kept the Bottom Bridge road to their left, although at times they could see and hear the cars travelling over the York River road. While passing through the swamp near the Chickaho
Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
hmond county, and the party reached the banks of the Potomac on Thursday. They were secreted in the house of a Union gentleman until Friday night, who, for twenty dollars in gold, chartered a boat to carry them to Maryland. They were then landed at Clement's bay, St. Mary's county, Maryland. Captain Porter here fell in with a detachment of the Second, Fifth, and Sixth Regular Cavalry, and was by them escorted to Leonardtown. Here the escaped officer was provided with transportation to Point Lookout, where, on reporting to General Manton, he was sent on to Washington. Major Bates, who escaped a few hours previous to Captain Porter, was subsequently recaptured. Captain Porter says that the tunnel by which the last batch of officers made their escape from Libby Prison, was commenced on last New Year's Night. It extended from one of the lower rooms of the prison some two hundred yards into the street, opening on a vacant lot. The youngest soldier in the Army of the Cumberland.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
Richmond, where he was a prisoner of war. Captain Porter was taken prisoner on the 15th of June, 1863, in the attack on Port Hudson. He was carried to Jackson, and thence conducted to the rebel capital, which he reached on the 29th of June. In Richmond, he was incarcerated in the now famous Libby prison. some two months previous to his escape, Captain Porter determined upon making such an attempt. He then tried to purchase a rebel uniform, but could not get it. At a later date, however, he the battery, and was told it was No. 4. Passed out along the Nine Mile road, and, coming to a wood, stayed there over night, and returned to Richmond next morning, in order to await a more favorable opportunity for reaching the Union lines. In Richmond, Captain Porter now remained nine days without suspicion, during which time he passed around the entire fortifications of the city. At the end of that time he procured a passport from a rebel officer, and, in company with a family of Irish
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
re of their duty, which was to destroy the track and bridges from Big Shanty, to and beyond Chattanooga, or as far as Bridgeport, Tennessee. This section of the road is built over innumerable creeks and rivers; and as General Mitchel had already cut off all communication from Corinth, by holding Huntsville, Alabama, the destruction of bridges which they were expected to effect, would have completely prevented rebel reinforcements and commissary stores from reaching Virginia, Tennessee, and Georgia. At Big Shanty, therefore, the train stopped for breakfast, and passengers, conductor, engineer, and hands, all went into the saloon, and were soon engaged in enjoying their matutinal meal. The conspirators were prompt to seize the golden moment of opportunity now offered to them. Leaving the cars, they quietly and naturally grouped together in squads of three and four, taking station with apparent carelessness on each side of the train, Andrews stationing himself at the coupling pin
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
ining, when in motion, a speed of sixty miles per hour-but they could not regain the time which they had lost. Reaching a bridge about twenty miles south of Dalton, Georgia, they set fire to one of their cars, piled on wood, and left it on the bridge, to which they thus hoped to set fire. Now, let us return to the rebel engine on after the fugitives. Now the race became terrible in its intensity. Nip and tuck the two trains swept with fearful speed past Resaca, Tilton, and on through Dalton, where the rebel train stopped to put off the telegraph operator, with instructions to telegraph to Chattanooga to have them stopped there, in case he should fail The caring Yankees indeed stopped just opposite, and very near to the encampment of a rebel regiment, and cut the wires, but the operator who had been dropped at Dalton had put the message through about two minutes before. They also again tore up the track, cut down a telegraph pole, and placed the two ends of it under the cross-
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
d rebel lay shot through the head. The passage of the Port Hudson batteries. The rebels had blockaded the Mississippi frleans, and above as far as Prophet's Island, just below Port Hudson, and Foote, Davis, and Porter had made a conquest of theirty-two miles by the river. Of these, the batteries at Port Hudson were, with the exception of those at Vicksburg, the most with General Grant in the siege of Vicksburg, to attack Port Hudson, and, under the fire of the bombardment, to attempt to foncussion as if tossed by an earthquake. The river at Port Hudson, as we have mentioned, makes a majestic curve. Rebel cathe Mississippi, in her attempt to pass the batteries at Port Hudson, might well have appalled the stoutest heart; but, in wa Farragut's three gunboats already between Vicksburg and Port Hudson. The firing became more rapid. From the upper batterieken prisoner on the 15th of June, 1863, in the attack on Port Hudson. He was carried to Jackson, and thence conducted to the
Leonardtown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.18
days after, having reached the Rappahannock, the river was crossed into Richmond county, and the party reached the banks of the Potomac on Thursday. They were secreted in the house of a Union gentleman until Friday night, who, for twenty dollars in gold, chartered a boat to carry them to Maryland. They were then landed at Clement's bay, St. Mary's county, Maryland. Captain Porter here fell in with a detachment of the Second, Fifth, and Sixth Regular Cavalry, and was by them escorted to Leonardtown. Here the escaped officer was provided with transportation to Point Lookout, where, on reporting to General Manton, he was sent on to Washington. Major Bates, who escaped a few hours previous to Captain Porter, was subsequently recaptured. Captain Porter says that the tunnel by which the last batch of officers made their escape from Libby Prison, was commenced on last New Year's Night. It extended from one of the lower rooms of the prison some two hundred yards into the street, ope
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