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Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
t be held by the National army! And this was kept up with but little variation till the defeat of McDowell's army at Bull Run put a violent end to it. It was for years supposed that Dana himself wrote the article, Forward to Richmond, but Danaion after sleepless nights of thought, and that it could not stand the criticism of itself that followed the disaster of Bull Run. Not content with this, it hastened to declare anew, July 29th: If the States that hate the Union-mean to destroythe last Dana's, is evident from their form as well as from their substance. The paper immediately after the defeat at Bull Run took strong ground in favor of reorganizing the cabinet, and continued to support such a reorganization till September, ography of Gustave Dore. On August 6, 1861, Dana, in a letter to his friend Huntington, commented upon the defeat at Bull Run as an awful blow for which Scott was mainly responsible. It had sickened Greeley, and kept him from the office two week
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
eve will be recognized as a good book by the critics. The Household Book of Poetry, which should have paid me one thousand dollars in January, lies sound asleep in the hope of a blessed resurrection. But we don't cry about it; that is, I and the wife and babies; but keep on having as jolly a time as ever, even without the luxuries of other days. But we have got a good cook, and if you were only back in the second story front, there would indeed be reason to believe in a superintending Providence. It's stupid in you, too, to be there in Paris, when we could keep you so nicely at work on the Cyclopaedia, filling up the gaps as we advance with printing. But never mind — there will be a good time for us all somewhere. My love to Mrs. Cranch, and to you, my dear Huntington, the same steady old affection which never showed a sign of giving out. On April 6, 1858, in explanation of his delay in writing, he says: The fact is I am a pretty busy chap. We print about seventy-fiv
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
the Tribune labored night and day to make his election sure. It entertained no doubt of the result. It as yet had no fear of secession, but on October 13th declared: The Union will in no case be shattered. It will not even be seriously shaken. It is a rock on which thousands may make shipwreck of their own hopes, fortunes, and even lives, but which will itself be unaffected by their criminal madness. Parties will rise and fall, factions may rave and cabals plot; but Saratoga and Yorktown are parts of our common country, and so will remain forever! This, in the opinion of experts, was written by Dana. It was followed after Lincoln's election by another, which was evidently Greeley's. It runs as follows: The union of these States is in its nature irrevocable, and only the earthquake of revolution can shiver it. Still we say, in all earnestness and good faith, whenever a whole section of this Republic-whether a half, a third, or only a fourth-shall truly desire and
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
friends. One of his most valued correspondents for a period of ten or twelve years was William Henry Huntington, a college friend and classmate, a gentleman of refined tastes in both art and literature, and long a correspondent of the Tribune in Paris. Their relations seem to have been most intimate and affectionate, and the letters now in my possession, written by Dana, show that the affection which he felt for Huntington was fully shared by every member of his family. With here and there a as ever, even without the luxuries of other days. But we have got a good cook, and if you were only back in the second story front, there would indeed be reason to believe in a superintending Providence. It's stupid in you, too, to be there in Paris, when we could keep you so nicely at work on the Cyclopaedia, filling up the gaps as we advance with printing. But never mind — there will be a good time for us all somewhere. My love to Mrs. Cranch, and to you, my dear Huntington, the same ste
Charles Anderson Dana (search for this): chapter 11
leader of his party in the Senate, Dana had long since come to be regarded by him with favor, if not with actual friendship. Withal, it must be recalled that he had never been a thick and thin supporter of Seward. They had met at Albany and elsewhere, and there is abundant evidence that their political, if not their personal, relations were close and confidential. If proof were needed on this point, it will be found in a holograph letter from Seward, marked Private, and addressed to Charles A. Dana, Esq., editor of the Tribune. It runs as follows: Washington, January 27, 1859. My dear Dana, I am glad that you have explained the discordance in the reports of the debate in the Spanish Cortes. I will add a note of it to my speech in the pamphlet publication. For three years I have regarded this Cuba demonstration as the most dangerous one to us that the Democracy could get up, and when it came at last, it was made a subject of anxious and careful discussion. It was apparent
fer the issue to go out as the Democrats had expected it to be made up would be disastrous to us in their part of the Union, What was done finally was in full consideration and agreement, and entirely satisfactory to all sides. When the subject comes up again we must meet it as we best can. We are anxious to draw out some Southern opposition, and this may be expected, if we do not too readily and selfishly appropriate the resistance to it to our own party uses. I expect Mr. Crittenden and Mr. Bell to oppose it, Mr. Hammond to vote against it, and some others, whom I will not name, to be relentless in their support. I see that the Post, usually so very right, calls for a more decided activity on our side. If you can do anything in the emergency to reconcile our friends to the system of defence we are making, you will do a great good. I think ridicule, not pure argument, the most safe and effective way of disposing of it. To talk of the danger of war from it is just what the move
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 11
ntinued to mark the policy of the Tribune, and yet there was no positive break between Greeley and his managing editor. They continued on good, if not cordial terms, each doing his regular work to the end. They had concurred in praising McClellan's conduct in West Virginia, and in hailing his appointment to command and lead the Army of the Potomac. They apparently began to lose faith in him, to doubt his ability, and to chafe under his inactivity at the same time. They united in praising Grant's success at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, and might have consoled each other with the assurance that the policy of onward to victory was fully vindicated in the West, notwithstanding its failure in the East--that it was a question of leaders, rather than of theories — of relative readiness and resources, rather than of perfect organization and correct strategy. So far as can be ascertained, they had no differences as to the wisdom of removing Simon Cameron, or of appointing Edwin M. Stanto
Salmon P. Chase (search for this): chapter 11
d in my decision, not so much by my personal inclination as by my obligation to the cause and its true and faithful friends. I thank you for giving my Covington speech a place in the Tribune. It has attracted a good deal of attention, and will, I hope, do some good. Please give my best regards to Mr. Greeley, who will, I trust, now find appreciation in some measure proportioned to his great services-and to your other co-laborers. How your work shames ours! Sincerely your friend, S. P. Chase. As might be readily inferred from what has already been said as to the relations of the Tribune with Seward, still by far the most conspicuous leader of his party in the Senate, Dana had long since come to be regarded by him with favor, if not with actual friendship. Withal, it must be recalled that he had never been a thick and thin supporter of Seward. They had met at Albany and elsewhere, and there is abundant evidence that their political, if not their personal, relations were
nge of policy Emancipation Proclamation Dana dismissed from the tribune But neither the hatred of slavery nor the love of freedom, engrossing as they were, could absorb or afford occupation for all Dana's energy and activity. It must have been early in 1848-as he was in Europe during the last half of that year — that he translated and published a small volume of German Stories and Legends for children, under the title of The Black Ant. Rudolph Garrigue, Astor House, New York, 1848-Tauchnitz, same. It included in its contents The Inkstand, The curious Cockerel, The Christ-child, The Princess Unca, Nut Cracker and sugar Dolly, and twelve others. The last of these was the longest. The little volume received wide circulation, and became most popular with American children, but was noticeable rather from the fact that it was one of the earliest, if not the actual forerunner, of a host which have since appeared both in Europe and America for the sepcial delectation of children.
George William Curtis (search for this): chapter 11
s growl over it!. .. [Fordyce] Barker is getting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've been and stopped her. The next year, after wondering how he ever found time to write at all, he wrote a long letter about the Cyclopaedia, the book of poetry, and also about their common friends, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Count Gurowski, Pike, and Parke Godwin, winding up with thanks for the little moral lecture Huntington, his correspondent, had given him on the Cyclopaedia, which he suggested was not needed, because he probably knew its faults and the difficulties attending its composition and publication better than any one else. With the first shot directed against the flag at Fort Sumter, Dana came out for war to the death. The Tribune also buckled on its armor and warned traitors of their d
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