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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
atty, was also taken, and 24 others, and 69 were killed or wounded. Meanwhile a small force, under Col. J. J. Neely, destroyed the railroad near Middleton. On November 22d Major Ham's battalion of State troops skirmished with the First Alabama (U. S.) near Corinth. Toward the close of November Chalmers was ordered by General Lee to demonstrate again between Memphis and La Grange, while Lee, with Ferguson and Ross, advanced to the east and united with General Forrest, who had been assigned es had swept over and around the walls. The brigade lost, in killed and wounded, 226. While Barksdale was left to defend Fredericksburg, Posey's brigade was fighting brilliantly at Chancellorsville. Posey and Mahone had been stationed at United States ford, and were among the first to confront the enemy on his crossing the river. One of Mahone's regiments and five companies of the Nineteenth Mississippi were left to hold the ford, while the remainder of Posey's brigade fell back to Chance
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ek, and the expedition turned back considerably short of its destination. On October 26th, Gen. Samuel F. Ferguson, with a small command, attacked and routed the First Alabama (U. S.) cavalry, near Bay Springs. Gen. Leonidas L. Polk was assigned to the command of the army of the Mississippi, October 23d, General Johnston retaining his position at the head of the department. Early in November, when Grant, now in supreme command of the United States forces between the Mississippi and the Alleghanies, was making a desperate effort to hurry Sherman to the relief of Chattanooga, besieged by Bragg, Chalmers was ordered by Johnston to harass the rear of Sherman's corps and destroy the railroad behind him. Chalmers sent Colonel Richardson, assisted by General Gholson, of the Mississippi militia, to tear up the road between La Grange and Corinth, while he made a demonstration between Memphis and La Grange. His force comprised Colonel Slemon's brigade, the Thirty-third cavalry, and George
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e had been various raids and reconnoissances in northern Mississippi from the Federal posts in Tennessee and at Corinth. General Chalmers was also active in the northeast, embarrassing the enemy's te Tallahatchie. The most formidable incursion was under Colonel Mizner and Major Henry from Tennessee. Chalmers, who had been bombarding the Federal steamers as they passed Dale's Point, promptlyh to Memphis, fighting at the Coldwater with some of Chalmers' force, and Phillips returned to Tennessee, reporting a large amount of destruction in spite of Winslow's interference. After this no s, advanced to the east and united with General Forrest, who had been assigned to command in West Tennessee. The movement began on December 1st, and on the 4th McCulloch's brigade moved to support Roe career of those who served in the army of Northern Virginia. In the cavalry operations in Tennessee early in 1863, the First and Twenty-eighth Mississippi cavalry regiments and the Fourth, Col.
Wolf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ar Middleton. On November 22d Major Ham's battalion of State troops skirmished with the First Alabama (U. S.) near Corinth. Toward the close of November Chalmers was ordered by General Lee to demonstrate again between Memphis and La Grange, while Lee, with Ferguson and Ross, advanced to the east and united with General Forrest, who had been assigned to command in West Tennessee. The movement began on December 1st, and on the 4th McCulloch's brigade moved to support Ross in burning the Wolf river bridge near Moscow. A severe fight followed, in which McCulloch and his Mississippians were distinguished for gallantry. The Federal loss was heavy including Colonel Hatch—who had been conspicuous for a long time in Northern Mississippi raids—severely wounded. In the meantime Colonel Slemons had burned the railroad trestle over Grisson's creek. About this time Loring's division was at Canton, Whitfield's and Cosby's brigades of cavalry were covering Vicksburg from Brownsville to Raym
Hebron, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Memphis and Corinth line; and, cutting his way through into Mississippi with half his command, made his headquarters below the Tallahatchie for the purpose of organizing his men and preparing for that brilliant defense of Northern Mississippi which confirmed his fame as one of the greatest generals of the age. At the close of 1863 the Federal troops in Mississippi were stationed as follows: 4,000 under Gen. J. D. Stevenson at Corinth; about 16,000 at and near Vicksburg, 2,500 cavalry at Hebron, and 150 at Natchez, under General McPherson. At Memphis and La Grange, Tenn., were about 20,000 of Hurlbut's corps. On the Confederate side, in the latter part of 1863, there were still about 2,500 men present in the parole camp at Enterprise, under command of General Forney. General Loring's division, with headquarters at Canton, contained the brigades of Buford, Featherston and John Adams. Featherston's brigade, entirely Mississippian, was made up of the Third regiment, Col. T. A. Me
Byhalia (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
he Federal cavalry toward La Grange. Early on the 11th he attacked Collierville, Tenn., which General Sherman had just entered with his staff and a battalion, increasing the garrison, previously composed of 240 men of the Sixty-sixth Indiana, to 480. Sherman took command and refused Chalmers' demand for surrender. A four hours fight followed, in which Chalmers took and burned the cavalry camp, but, on account of the strength of the works, was unable to capture the enemy. Retiring toward Byhalia Colonel Richardson had a brisk fight next day, and the command fell back to Ingram's Mill. On the 13th Chalmers fought a battle at Wyatt, in which the loss was considerable on both sides. The expedition of General Lee's which Chalmers covered was made along the Memphis & Charleston railroad in Alabama, with orders from General Johnston to cut the railroad between Chattanooga and Nashville; but the cooperation of General Wheeler, which was desired, was delayed on account of the exhaustion
McMinnville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
y, and the command fell back to Ingram's Mill. On the 13th Chalmers fought a battle at Wyatt, in which the loss was considerable on both sides. The expedition of General Lee's which Chalmers covered was made along the Memphis & Charleston railroad in Alabama, with orders from General Johnston to cut the railroad between Chattanooga and Nashville; but the cooperation of General Wheeler, which was desired, was delayed on account of the exhaustion of his command consequent upon the famous McMinnville raid. On October 14th, General McPherson, commanding at Vicksburg, started on an expedition toward Canton with 6,500 infantry and Winslow's cavalry brigade. His advance was gallantly checked by Cosby's brigade under Col. Wirt Adams, and Logan's brigade, on Bogue Chitto creek, and the expedition turned back considerably short of its destination. On October 26th, Gen. Samuel F. Ferguson, with a small command, attacked and routed the First Alabama (U. S.) cavalry, near Bay Springs. G
Noxubee County (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Mississippi and one North Carolina regiments in that celebrated charge. Mr. Rietti (Annals of Mississippi, p. 148) writes as follows: As it was, the Union line proved too strong for the attacking force, and remained unbroken save the place where the brigade of Gen. Joseph R. Davis pushed into it at the historic fence and there halted for breath. At this point Lieut. A. J. Baker and Lieut. Tyler Hester, both distinguished Mississippians, fell severely wounded, and Capt. J. R. Prince, of Noxubee county, after trying in vain to find a superior officer, and learning that strong reinforcements were moving up from the Federal rear, gave the order for retreat. Lieutenants Baker and Hester were left on the field and were taken prisoners and carried to the Union rear, where there was disorder and confusion at this point. Captain Prince, in a recent letter which sounds like an echo from Balaklava, says that after giving the order to retreat the brigade retired, about 300 in number, in passab
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ississippi July to December, 1863 siege of Jackson minor operations in the State service of Mi army which General Johnston had collected at Jackson for June 25th shows the following organizatioed of the capitulation. He then fell back to Jackson, reaching thereon the 7th; and on the 9th Shey, Col. W. M. Inge, and later was assigned to Jackson's division. The effective strength of these Walthall joined in the fight on the right of Jackson's brigade, still against Thomas. In the seveegiment lost 25 killed and 141 wounded. In Jackson's brigade the Fifth Mississippi regiment lostn the force at Fredericksburg was depleted by Jackson's flank movement, Barksdale's brigade was givhis was the extreme right of Lee's army up to Jackson's flank movement. Thence, on May 1st, Posey's men marched on the plank road, leading Jackson's advance, and sending out the Twelfth regiment asving disappeared from his front on account of Jackson's success on the left, Posey advanced, captur
Ingrams Mill (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
, which General Sherman had just entered with his staff and a battalion, increasing the garrison, previously composed of 240 men of the Sixty-sixth Indiana, to 480. Sherman took command and refused Chalmers' demand for surrender. A four hours fight followed, in which Chalmers took and burned the cavalry camp, but, on account of the strength of the works, was unable to capture the enemy. Retiring toward Byhalia Colonel Richardson had a brisk fight next day, and the command fell back to Ingram's Mill. On the 13th Chalmers fought a battle at Wyatt, in which the loss was considerable on both sides. The expedition of General Lee's which Chalmers covered was made along the Memphis & Charleston railroad in Alabama, with orders from General Johnston to cut the railroad between Chattanooga and Nashville; but the cooperation of General Wheeler, which was desired, was delayed on account of the exhaustion of his command consequent upon the famous McMinnville raid. On October 14th, Genera
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